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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire to Dingle

#D2DRace – It is the two highest rated boats that lead the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle fleet along the south coas this afternoont, Lee Overlay Partners (Adrian Lee) on the water and Antix (Anthony O'Leary) as IRC overall leader.

The leaders lie due south of Cork harbour, while the peloton is spread out over the Wexford and Waterford coasts, with every boat clear of the Tuskar and broad reaching westwards.

In the two handed division, HYC's Blue Eyes (Colm Buckley & Simon Knowles, Howth YC) are current leaders while Lady Rowena (David Bolger) of the Royal St George is first in the Cruiser division.

Current forecast suggests a dying breeze will be followed by a southwesterly veering as the fleet rounds the Fastnet meaning the probable end of spinnakers for a while.

Follow the race tracker here

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#D2DRace – Rounding the Tuskar Rock after 7am this morning, the Royal Cork and Baltimore crew on Commodore's Cup winner Antix (Anthony O'Leary) is heading west at 7 knots to be first in IRC handicap and contiune to be 2015 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race leaders. After a night at sea, the 30–boat National Yacht Club fleet is still tightly bunched off the Wexford coast with 190–miles to sail to the Dingle finish. The bulk of the fleet will round the Tuskar Rock by mid–morning with some early notable front runners including the Dublin Bay DB1 Red Rhum (Johnathan Nicholson), as high as fourth place. The vintage Dehler chose a shore side strategy from the Dun Laoghaire start heading directly to Wicklow Head. It was an inshore strategy, with a premium on downwind skills, that paid off with the leaders in three divisions (racing, two handed and cruiser) all picking that option.

The forecast until Sunday at 7am show only light northerly winds along the Cork coast.

 

Follow the race tracker here.

Read more on the 2015 D2D in this morning's Sailing on Saturday blog

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#d2d – Last night's start of the 280-mile Dun Laoghaire-Dingle Race was a tricky business, with the ebb starting to sluice out of Dublin Bay, and a less-than-commanding breeze making for an inelegant beginning to this year's biggest offshore race in Irish waters. If anyone hoped to see a colourful spectacle reflecting top end sailing's supposedly glamorous image, they were woefully disappointed. Yet for offshore racing aficionados, it was vintage stuff. W M Nixon tries to explain why.

If you set out to pick a media-unfriendly time to stage a minority sports event, you really couldn't do better (or maybe that should be worse) than nine o'clock on a Friday night. All the regular lines of communication have pretty well closed up at the end of the working week, while the weekend itself is cordoned off for the big time spectator-friendly stadium or TV sports spectaculars.

Yet the National Yacht Club's biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle sailing race went off at precisely nine o'clock last night, and nobody thought it at all odd. In fact, the time was selected to suit various offshore racing owners who'd told organizer Martin Crotty that they'd find it much easier to get their amateur crew together if the start was timed to be comfortably after close of business on a Friday evening, the thinking being that it's better to seem to be busy about the workplace right through to the end of the week, but non-appearance first thing on a Monday morning can somehow be slipped under the radar.

It may be slightly crazy thinking, but that's the way the Corinthian sailing mind works. It means that the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race is run entirely for the benefit and enjoyment of its many amateur participants. And if the media in any shape or form wants to cover it, then the media has to learn to play by the D2D's rules.

All of which makes the D2D uniquely attractive in an era when even the most historic and tradition-bound sporting events are distorted, and maybe even re-located in the calendar, in order to serve some arrogant media and publicity requirements.

So as with all the best sailing events, the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race is most truly savoured by taking part. But if for some reason we can't take part ourselves, it's all part of this classic race's attraction that we will readily put the beginning of our own weekend on hold in order to give the D2D start the attention and respect it deserves.

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It may not be a sight to stir the heart of the casual observer, yet for those involved the difficulties of a downwind down-tide start are all part of the game. Photo: W M Nixon

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Jedi and Powder Monkey are two of the six J/109s taking part in the race to Dingle. Photo: W M Nixon

Admittedly the fact that the final starting lineup of 30 boats included craft of the calibre of the all-conquering Antix and the consistent and ever-more-attractive Cookson 50 Lee Overlay Partners added to the appeal. When the word came on the grapevine that Anthony O'Leary's Ker 40 Antix was making final preparations in the relative peace of the Royal Irish YC pontoon rather than at the George with its impressive and busy entry of nine boats, let alone at the National where the place was simply heaving, we made it our business to nip down to the RIYC. And there indeed was Antix and her crew of superstars, beavering away just like yachties anywhere and at every level simply in order to be ready for the start.

It was a chance to see the current superstar without her makeup on, as she'd recently been delivered from Cowes against headwinds all the way by young Robert O'Leary, and now the support van was parked in a convenient if unglitzy spot nearby while gear was transferred hither and yon. Yet there was time for a quick look below and a chance to experience the fact that this highly-tuned boat sings to anyone who is on the sailing wavelength – she really does.

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Antix - a boat that really does sing to anyone on the sailing wavelength. Photo: W M Nixon

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Crosshaven's Robert O'Leary and his father Anthony in Dun Laoghaire – the younger O'Leary brought Antix from Cowes with headwinds all the way. Photo: W M Nixon

dd6.jpgdd6.jpgFunctional and hyper-light, but you would scarcely describe the arrangements below in Antix as "accommodation". Photo: W M Nixon

dd7.jpgThe brains of the boat – the Antix navstation is hidden away "somewhere down aft". Photo: W M Nixon

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The Antix keel and mast are engineered together. Photo: W M Nixon

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It's not quite a Learjet, but the Antix support van does what's needed. Photo: W M Nixon

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"And now for something completely different". Amazing Grace from Tralee, the defending D2D winner of 2013, makes for a marked contrast with Antix. Photo: W M Nixon

dd11.jpgCrazy night, crazy place, crazy prices – and great food. The service at the National YC lived up to the billing. Photo: W M Nixon

Then it was on into the melee at the National. How manager Tim O'Brien and his team managed to cope with the endless throughput of people and their food and drink and socializing requirements is beyond the imagination. And the start of the D2D was only one of several events taking place in a typically busy summer Friday evening. Yet somehow it was all done with the greatest good humour, and then out we went in the Dublin Bay Sailing Club's Committee Boat Mac Lir hoping to find a decent breeze outside the harbour, but the photos say it all.

So where's the sport in all this? Well believe me, it's all right there. Some of us may have gone away from the fleet as it trickled out of Dublin Bay thinking that there are surely more entertaining forms of sailing. But the reality is that there's something so utterly absorbing about a race like this - when you're actually doing it - that the thought of being anywhere else doing anything else simply doesn't occur. And far from being envious of the spectator boats peeling away and heading back to the bright lights in the warm places, on the contrary you're glad to see the back of them, leaving you undistracted in the sacred task of squeezing an extra tenth of a knot out of your beloved boat as she sails into the night. That's what amateur offshore racing is all about.

You can follow the race here on Aloat.ie - the final starting lineup was as follows, as the IMOCA 60 Kilcullen Voyager didn't race:

Dingle Skellig Hotel Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race 2015, start 2100hrs Friday June 12th. Entries listed by rating.

1 Lee Overlay Partners, (Cookson 50, Adrian Lee, Royal St George YC) - 1.340

2 Antix, (Ker 40, Anthony O'Leary, Royal Cork YC & Baltimore SC) - 1.210

3 WOW, (Farr 42, George Sisk, Royal Irish YC) - 1.124

4 Pogeen (Pogo 1050, John Gilmore, Strangford Lough YC) -1.096 (Cruiser)

5 Aquelina (J/122, James & Sheila Tyrrell, Arklow SC) – 1.078

6 Aurelia (J/122, Chris & Patanne Power Smith, RStGYC) – 1.077

7 Endgame (A 35, Frank Doyle, RCYC) – 1.027

8 Dear Prudence (J/109, Jonathan Bourke, ManhattanYC) – 1.021

9 Mojito (J109,Peter Dunlop & Vicky Cox, Pwllheli SC) – 1.018

10 Ruth (J/109, Shanahan family, National YC) – 1.017

11 Wakey Wakey (J/109, Roger Smith, Poolbeg Y & BC), - 1.015

12 Powder Monkey (J/109, Chris Moore, NYC) – 1.014

13 Jedi (J/109, J Treanor, A Sarratt, M McGuinness, RIYC, NYC, RStGYC) – 1.009

14 Exhale (X-Yachts 362 Sport, Derry & Hilda Good, RCYC) – 1.009

15 First of September (First 435, Jerry Whiston, PY&BC) – 1.003

16 Lula Belle (First 36.7, Liam Coyne, NYC) – 1.002

17 Alchimiste (JPK 9.60, Mike Murphy, National YC) – 0.998

18 Blue Eyes (Elan 340, Colm Buckley & Simon Knowles, Howth YC) – 0.987 (2-handed)

19 Joker (Sigma 38, David Gibbons, Kinsale YC) – 0.982 (2-handed)

20 Windshift (Jeanneau Sunfast 37, Brendan Coghlan, RStGYC) – 0.980

21 Persistance (Sigma 38, Jerry Collins, RStGYC) 0.978 (Cruiser)

22 Yahtzee (Beneteau Oceanis 411) Richard Mossop, Dun Laoghaire MYC – 0.978 (Cruiser)

23 Red Rhum (Dehler db1, Jonathan Nicholson, RStGYC) – 0.968

24 Desert Star (Jeanneau Sunfast 37, Ronan O Siochru, RStGYC) – 0.966

25 Ipanema (Dehler 37 CR, Martin Breen Galway Bay SC) – 0.959 (Cruiser)

26 Legally Blonde (Beneteau First 31.7, Cathal Drohan, RStGYC) 0.951

27 Amazing Grace (Oyster 37, Brian O'Sullivan & Frances Clifford, Tralee Bay SC) – 0.928

28 Big Deal (Dehler 34, Derek & Conor Dillon, Foynes YC) - 0.922 (2-handed)

29 Lady Rowena (Sadler 34, David Bolger, RStGYC) 0.911 (Cruiser)

30 Polished Manx (Sigma 33, Kuba Szymanski, Douglas Bay YC) – 0.899

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John Gilmore's Pogo 1050 Pogeen from Strangford Lough looked like a boat which would have preferred more wind. Photo: W M Nixon

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Shaping in for the start – George Disk's Farr 42 WOW and Mike Murphy's twin-ruddered JPK 9.60 Alchimiste. Photo: W M Nixon

dd14.jpgOn the start, Adrian Lee's Cookson 50 Lee Overlay Partners has found a gap to run through, while in the foreground Frank Doyle's A35 Endgame is cleanly away. Photo: W M Nixon

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Last glimpse as they head into the night with Antix (left) leading the fleet into the Channel in search of stronger favourable tide and a better breeze. Photo: W M Nixon

Follow Afloat.ie's coverage of the race on these handy links below:

D2D Race tracker 

D2D News updates

Published in W M Nixon

#Dun Laoghaire to Dingle – Conditions in the early stages of this year's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race are putting a premium on downwind skills, as the crews seek the best VMG through maximising gybing angles. The following ebb tide encourages the offshore trend, but the navigators will have their work cut out positioning for the next flood.

Antony O'Leary's Antix is the early on the water leader, but being chased seaward by James and Sheila Tyrell's J122 Aquelina and the top rated Lee Overlay Partners.

The forecast predicts lighter winds around the first corner at Tuskar, suggesting that tide will play a major factor in the eventual outcome.

 

 

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#d2d –  Will he or won't he? D2D could mean dinner to dinner for enda's imoca 60 racing to dingle tonight, but only if he makes the start. The prospect of a new course record and the presence of top offshore racing boats has been giving an extra zing to tonight's 9.0pm start in Dublin Bay of the biennial 280–mile Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race writes W M Nixon.

With winds forecast to be between north and northeast, the underlying forecast pattern seems to favour the bigger boats. An area of softer breezes is expected to settle over the south coast tomorrow, but by that time the front runners will hope to be shaping up around the Fastnet Rock and Mizen Head to find stronger winds again off the Kerry coast.

The 31-strong fleet is a real quality turnout, as it includes the British IRC Champion 2015 in the form of Anthony O'Leary's Ker 40 Antix sailing for both Royal Cork and Baltimore SC. Also in with conditions which could be to her liking is Adrian Lee's Cookson 50 Lee Overlay Partners, whose CV includes overall win in the 2007 Fastnet when she was Ger O'Rourke's Chieftain, and overall win in the inaugural RORC Caribbean 600 in 2009 on the first major outing in the Lee ownership, which has since continued with other successes such as the outright win in the new Dubai-Muscat race.

But while the list of definite contenders is almost precisely as tabulated below with the fleet ranked by ratings, as of 1130hrs this morning it began to have the flavour of Hamlet without the Prince. News came through that Enda O Coineen's IMOCA 60 Kilcullen Voyager – which he acquired last Autumn – had taken eleven days instead of the expected seven to do the necessary Kilcullen voyaging up from Lanzarote in the Canaries. She only got into Dun Laoghaire some time during the night, and with four days gone from his usual hectic schedule, the busy Galwayman was seriously contemplating withdrawing from the race as other matters required his urgent attention, and the boat wasn't race ready.

As we aim this preview towards a noon Friday deadline, the word is that Dun Laoghaire's finest are working on the Kilcullen team to persuade them to go, for it's possible that all she needs is tomorrow's breakfast and lunch to be put on board. In the conditions expected for the next 30 hours, an IMOCA 60 should be able to get from Dublin Bay to Dingle in less than 24 hours, thereby holding out the attractive prospect for her crew of the pre-race dinner in the National YC this evening, and dinner tomorrow night in one of Dingle's deservedly renowned eateries.

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The Lee Overlay crew are Kerry bound tonight on the canting keel Cookson 50

But enough of speculation. Of the real rather than virtual entries, for Anthony O'Leary the Dingle Race is unfinished business, as he looked to have it in the bag with the silver Antix two years ago, but then one of the lowest rated boats in the fleet, Brian O'Sullivan and Frances Clifford's Oyster 37 Amazing Grace, came ghosting in with a new breeze and took the title.

Probably the best racing of all will be among the J/109s, which muster an excellent turnout of six boats which fit into a rating band between 1.021 at the top for Jay Bourke's Dear Prudence (sailing for Manhatttan Yacht Club, no less) right down to the Treanor/Sarratt/McGuinness-owned Jedi which has somehow got herself down to 1.009.

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Antix (ex Catapult) is entered jointly by Royal Cork Yacht Club and Baltimore Sailing Club. Photo: Rick Tomlinson/Rolex

Be that as it may, the smart money will be on the Shanahan family with Ruth rated at 1.017, as racing the big one to Dingle is a Shanahan tradition covering three generations. They're doing it for the hosting National Yacht Club, but oddly enough the club which is putting up most boats is the neighbouring Royal St George, which appears on nine of the entries, a very encouraging sign of underlying club health.

While most boats are straight racing, there's a cruiser division within the fleet, and there are three two-handed racers, though noted two-handed sailor Liam Coyne with the First 36.7 Lula Belle is doing it fully crewed with his shipmates from Malta with whom he has sailed to cut a mighty swathe through the Middle Sea race in recent years.

So now as we post this, the question is: Will Enda, or won't he? 

We will be continuing our coverage of the start with race updates after the start, there will be a piece in Sailing on Saturday first thing tomorrow morning, and you can of course follow the fleet on ISORA's Avery Crest Yellowbrick trackers through Afloat.ie. Follow Afloat.ie's coverage of the race on these handy links below:

D2D Race tracker 

D2D News updates

WM Nixon's D2D 2015 blog (from Saturday am)

Dingle Skellig Hotel Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race 2015, start 2100hrs Friday June 12th. Entries listed by rating.

1 Kilcullen Voyager, (IMOCA Open 60 - Owen Clarke Design, Enda O'Coineen, Royal Galway YC) - 1.694

2 Lee Overlay Partners, (Cookson 50, Adrian Lee, Royal St George YC) - 1.340

3 Antix, (Ker 40, Anthony O'Leary, Royal Cork YC & Baltimore SC) - 1.210

4 WOW, (Farr 42, George Sisk, Royal Irish YC) - 1.124

5 Pogeen (Pogo 1050, John Gilmore, Strangford Lough YC) -1.096 (Cruiser)

6 Aquelina (J/122, James & Sheila Tyrrell, Arklow SC) – 1.078

7 Aurelia (J/122, Chris & Patanne Power Smith, RStGYC) – 1.077

8 Endgame (A 35, Frank Doyle, RCYC) – 1.027

9 Dear Prudence (J/109, Jonathan Bourke, ManhattanYC) – 1.021

10 Mojito (J109,Peter Dunlop & Vicky Cox, Pwllheli SC) – 1.018

11 Ruth (J/109, Shanahan family, National YC) – 1.017

12 Wakey Wakey (J/109, Roger Smith, Poolbeg Y & BC), - 1.015

13 Powder Monkey (J/109, Chris Moore, NYC) – 1.014

14 Jedi (J/109, J Treanor, A Sarratt, M McGuinness, RIYC, NYC, RStGYC) – 1.009

15 Exhale (X-Yachts 362 Sport, Derry & Hilda Good, RCYC) – 1.009

16 First of September (First 435, Jerry Whiston, PY&BC) – 1.003

17 Lula Belle (First 36.7, Liam Coyne, NYC) – 1.002

18 Alchimiste (JPK 9.60, Mike Murphy, National YC) – 0.998

19 Blue Eyes (Elan 340, Colm Buckley & Simon Knowles, Howth YC) – 0.987 (2-handed)

20 Joker (Sigma 38, David Gibbons, Kinsale YC) – 0.982 (2-handed)

21 Windshift (Jeanneau Sunfast 37, Brendan Coghlan, RStGYC) – 0.980

22 Persistance (Sigma 38, Jerry Collins, RStGYC) 0.978 (Cruiser)

23 Yahtzee (Beneteau Oceanis 411) Richard Mossop, Dun Laoghaire MYC – 0.978 (Cruiser)

24 Red Rhum (Dehler db1, Jonathan Nicholson, RStGYC) – 0.968

25 Desert Star (Jeanneau Sunfast 37, Ronan O Siochru, RStGYC) – 0.966

26 Ipanema (Dehler 37 CR, Martin Breen Galway Bay SC) – 0.959 (Cruiser)

27 Legally Blonde (Beneteau First 31.7, Cathal Drohan, RStGYC) 0.951

28 Amazing Grace (Oyster 37, Brian O'Sullivan & Frances Clifford, Tralee Bay SC) – 0.928

29 Big Deal (Dehler 34, Derek & Conor Dillon, Foynes YC) - 0.922 (2-handed)

30 Lady Rowena (Sadler 34, David Bolger, RStGYC) 0.911 (Cruiser)

31 Polished Manx (Sigma 33, Kuba Szymanski, Douglas Bay YC) – 0.899

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#d2d – A former Rolex Middle Sea Race winner will contest Friday's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race that departs Dublin Bay at 9pm. Maltese sailor Aaron Gatt Floridia, the owner/skipper of Otra Vez, will race on board Liam Coyne's Round Britian and Ireland winning Lula Belle, a Beneteau 36.7. Floridia, who has won class 3 of Malta's biggest sailing event, will also be joined by his brother Edward for the Irish offshore highlight. Coyne has previously sailed with Otra Vez in the Mediterranean Sea.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#d2d – After two frustrating races on the Irish Sea this weekend the ISORA fleet now has under three weeks to prepare for the start of the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race. The National Yacht Club has 27 confirmed entries and it is expecting another three for the biennial offshore, up seven from the 2013 edition.

Among the ISORA boats competing in the 'Round Ireland Lite'  is the on form J109 Ruth (Liam Shanahan), the Round Britain and Ireland winner, the Beneteau 36.7 Lula Belle (Liam Coyne). Other entries from around the coast inlcude the defending champion from Tralee Bay, Amazing Grace (Brian O'Sullivan) and Waterford Harbour's A35 Fools Gold (Rob McConnell) who is leading class 2 at the Scottish series.

 

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#d2d – The canting-keel Cookson 50 Lee Overlay Partners skippered by Dun Laoghaire's Adrian Lee is the latest high profile entry into this June's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race. The Royal St. George yacht is a proven offshore winner, taking the inaugural 2009 RORC Caribbean 600 race and overall victory (as Chieftain) in the 2007 Fastnet Race.

Most recently, in 2013, the globe trotting 50–footer set a course record of 2 days 53 minutes and 40 seconds and the overall win in the 360– mile race from Dubai to Muscat in Oman. In what is looking like a potent line-up for the 12th edition of the National Yacht Club race, this Dun Laoghaire entry joins the Commodore's Cup winning Ker 40, Catapult skippered by Anthony O'Leary of Cork, Afloat's 2014 Sailor of the Year. 

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#D2D – Finishing shortly after 3am, a County Kerry entry, Amazing Grace, won the 2013 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race, the first Kerry yacht to win in the 20–year history of the race. The Tralee Bay Sailing Club entry, one of the slowest, oldest and heaviest boats in the race was sailed impressively by a Fenit crew and skippered by Brian O'Sullivan to beat some of Ireland's top offshore racers.

Overall results for the 2013 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race are here. Full race report in Summer Afloat magazine published late June. 

While a few boats in the 22–boat fleet have yet to finish this morning, only two of them have lower ratings and are now too far behind to affect Amazing Grace.  Official confirmation of the result is expected by the race organisers later this morning.

Second overall looks likely to go to Spindrift, a Hallberg Rassy 34 under the command of David Kelly of Waterford Harbour Sailing Club, which should correct to about an hour behind Amazing Grace, while Lulla Belle, Liam Coyne and Brian Flahive's First 36.7 from the National Yacht Club, will be about an hour further back in third place.

Lulla Belle is also the winner of the double-handed division.

This was a race that favoured lower rating boats as the light winds experienced for all but the latter stages didn't allow the higher handicappers to generate the necessary distance to save their time. Additionally, the wind continued to build after the first finishers, allowing the smaller boats to cover the last 60 to 70 miles at speeds equalling or exceeding that of their faster competitors.

The south coast turned out to be a turning point for Amazing Grace, skipper Brian O'Sullivan informing Afloat.ie:

"Most of fleet sitting off south coast, looking for wind pockets! Excellent day/night to be out on the water. All to play for, with half the race more or less completed! Moved south a little to get the first break in the wind, keeping fingers crossed! Wouldn't be any place else, other than the snoring from down below, all is good!

Once again D2D, a half Round Ireland, has thrown up an interesting set of conditions resulting in an outsider's victory that will not only entice many of the entrants to return in 2015, but should also attract first timers.

amazinggracecrew

Celebrating in the early hours at Dingle Harbour the winning Amazing Grace crew are back row (left to right) Finbarr O'Connell, skipper Brian O'Sullivan, Fergus Kelliher, Pearse Boyland, Tim Kelliher, Cian O'Donnell. Front row Brendan Culloty and Michael McCormack. Photo: Frances Clifford

Amazing Grace, an Oyster 37 was built from a kit by Cork sailor Jim Fegan on a farmyard in the 1980s.

A past Round Ireland and Fastnet race competitor this offshore campaigner previously sustained damage to her rudder in heavy weather off Wexford.

Little was heard of this Oyster until she was bought by former owner Gary Horgan and raced out of Kinsale for a number of years before moving to Fenit in County Kerry under Gerard O'Donnell.

O'Sullivan bought the boat in March this year from O'Donnell and this morning's result is a highlight of her 30–year career.

O'Sullivan is a well known boat builder producing among others the 1720 sportsboat. He is managing director of O'Sullivan Marine, a leading Irish boat builder based in Tralee.

This afternoon the Tralee Bay Sailing Club Commodore Pat Daly congratulated O'Sullivan and the crew of Amazing Grace on their 'historic' win.

'This victory, by Amazing Grace, a first for a local boat, will further boost this week's ICRA National Cruiser Championship & WIORA Regional West Coast Championships, to be hosted by the club'

The club expect 500 sailors and over 60 boats to hit Fenit for four days of racing from Wednesday to Saturday, June 12-15th in Tralee Bay'.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

#D2D – As the crews of Antix and Wow enjoy the hospitality in Dingle tonight the lowest rated boats are enjoying the limelight of podium potential as they close on the finish line. See D2D race tracker here

Tralee Sailing Club's Amazing Grace is in pole position with a little bit to spare and will be hoping that the wind remains steady in strength and direction over the remaining thirty miles so that they can maintain their advantage over David Kelly's Spindrift (Halberg Rassy 34).

Meanwhile Spindrift has to watch over her shoulder, but the real battle seems to be for third place between Lula Belle (Beneteau First 36.7), Polished Manx (Sigma 38) and Mojito (J109).

While the result might be seen as a testament to the durability of older designs, once the wind died mid-race it was always going to be a low handicap benefit. Mojito and Lula Belle have done well to stick with the leaders.

All things going well over the last few hours, Dingle will be feting a Kerry win in the small hours.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle
Page 5 of 6

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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