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Displaying items by tag: Glengariff

#CruiseLiners - A big cruiseship by Banty Bay standards involved notably a maiden call visit today to the scenic west Cork anchorage, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The megayacht-like Seabourn Quest of 32,000 tonnes had yesterday called to Cobh, Cork Harbour, before making an arrival in Bantry Bay this morning. To mark the maiden call, a reception was held on board where the harbourmaster of Bantry Bay Port Company and Bantry Business Assocation exchanged gifts with the ship's master.

Operating at the high-end of the luxury cruise-sector, Seabourn Quest has a guest capacity for only 498 passengers. The sleek twin-funnelled Seabourn Quest whose godmother is the English fashion icon and actress Twiggy, entered service in 2011. The ship regarded as a game -changer at the top end of the market was built by Italian yard of T. Mariotti yard in Genoa.

The operators claim the Spa at Seabourn is the largest on any ultra-luxury ship, at 11,400 square feet which encompasses both indoor and outdoor spaces spread over two decks.

Only Prinsendam of Holland America Line eclipses the current caller to the West Cork destination in terms of tonnage, at 39,000 tonnes. The cruiseship according to the port's website had made a call in May.

In total, 10 cruise callers are scheduled to call to Bantry Bay this season, though not all cruiseships will take anchorage off Bantry where five are planned before the season ends in September. Equally the same number of callers will by the end of season, anchor off neighbouring Glengariff with its attractions, among them Garnish Island.

The next port of call for Seabourn Quest is Foynes, where the Shannon estuary port is a more unusual destination to receive cruiseships. 

Published in Cruise Liners

#BantryCruiseships – As previously reported, Serenissima (1960/2,598grt) a 110 passenger exploration cruiseship which called to Glengariff mid-week was yesterday followed by Saga Sapphire to the secluded west Cork anchorage, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Operated by Serenissima Cruises, she reflects a different era with classically designed hull forms and overall appearance of an era that remains with the Hurtigruten final traditional ship, Lofoten which celebrates her 50th anniversary this year.

Saga Sapphire (1981/37,301grt) with a 710 passenger capacity is easily the largest cruise ship caller this season to call to Bantry Bay. Operated by Saga Cruises, she had sailed from Killybegs, having also visited Belfast and Dublin.

She is the third caller this season out a total of six to visit Bantry Bay Port which at the turn of this year, saw responsibility for the control of Bantry Bay Harbour transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

The transfer order was made by Minister for Transport, Leo Varadkar TD, and for the purposes of managing operations in Bantry Bay, the Port of Cork Company established a subsidiary company, Bantry Bay Port Company Limited.

To date, Le Boreal and Minerva have called in late May opening the cruise ship season which will also see Amadea call in August make a repeat visit in October to mark the end of the season.

As for the interim fifth visitor to call to Glengariff, Club Med 2 is to make an appearance in September, her 'tallship' presence will further add to the allure of cruising is such a scenic setting.

As there are no berthing facilities to cater for cruiseships alongside charming Glengariff, this all lends to the experience of anchoring in the surrounds of beautiful Bantry Bay.

Nearby is Garnish Island, where many visitors take the small ferry service to the island, where the world renowned gardens are laid out with specimen plants that are rare in this climate.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

Glengarriff harbour has a small pontoon to assist with embarkation at the quayside

Published in Irish Marinas
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#CRUISE LINERS- Galway Harbour can look forward to welcoming nine cruise calls to the mid-west port this year, with the first visitor being Arion which is scheduled to arrive in Galway Bay during late May, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arion harks back to an era of the more classically designed ships with graceful sweeping lines. The 5,888 tonnes veteran vessel was launched in 1965 at Pula, in Croatia, as Istra and later in her career she underwent a major reconstruction in a Lisbon shipyard during 2000.

Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV) will be sending their Marco Polo, another classic veteran, in July as part of a 12 night 'Emerald Isle' discovery cruise departing Tilbury, with en-route calls to Cobh and Glengariff the previous day.

For a full listing of the cruise-calls schedule click HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners
As the cruise season draws to a close, passengers from the German 28,856 tonnes Amadea, visited Bantry Bay, west Cork today, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The former Japanese cruiseship launched in 1991, anchored off picturesque Glengariff and neighbouring Garinish Island. Amadea had called to Waterford Estuary yesterday and before her first Irish port of call she called to Dartmouth en-route from embarking passengers in Bremerhaven.

At 192m in length, the 600-passenger capacity cruiseship is operated by Pheonix Reisen. The German based travel agency also runs fleetmates Albratross and Artania. The later Finish built vessel was best known as Princess Cruises Royal Princess, when launched by the late Diana, Princess of Wales in 1984.

Apart from the handful of cruiseships that call, Bantry Bay is otherwise used by oil tankers bringing supplies to the Whiddy Island Oil Terminal. The terminal consists of an offshore single point mooring, tanker Jetty, and an onshore tank farm. The bay runs some 35kms long and is 10km wide at its broadest at the entrance and steadily narrows to 3-4kms at its head. In addition the bay is largest of the main inlets in the south-west.

Glengariff in recent years has also welcomed another German operator, Peter Deilmann's Deutschland (1988/22,496grt) and the UK based Cruise & Maritime Voyages Marco Polo (1966/20,080grt). To read more on this vessel which regularly calls to Irish ports click HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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