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Displaying items by tag: Helvick Head

Youghal RNLI’s volunteer crew in East Cork were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat at 4.03pm on Sunday (9 June) to assist a sailor onboard a 35ft yacht that had suffered steering failure some two miles south of Mine Head Lighthouse.

The request came from the Irish Coast Guard following a report that a sailor had been experiencing problems with steering and requested assistance.

Weather conditions were cloudy with a moderate breeze and a choppy sea state.

Around 20 minutes after launching, the lifeboat crew arrived on scene and located the vessel. One crew member boarded the boat and assisted the sailor to rig an emergency steering tiller, which was successful in getting the vessel moving.

Upon further assessment of the situation, a decision was made that the lifeboat would escort the sailor to the safety of Helvick Head harbour in Co Waterford.

Helvick Head RNLI’s lifeboat later launched and once on scene, one crew member went onboard the casualty vessel and the lifeboat from Helvick Head then escorted the sailor back to the safety of the harbour.

Youghal RNLI was stood down and their crew member was transferred back to the lifeboat which then returned to station.

Speaking after the call-out, Youghal RNLI helm Liam Keogh said: “The owner of the boat made the right decision in calling for help as soon as they experienced difficulty, allowing both lifeboats to assist in returning the sailor to safety.

“Anyone can experience difficulty once on the water so we encourage everyone to carry a means of communication before heading out to sea. Should you get into difficulty, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

On Sunday afternoon (21 April), the RNLI Helvick Head was called to rescue three boaters who got into difficulty near Helvick Head, southwest of Dungarvan. The Irish Coast Guard requested the assistance of the volunteer crew who launched their inshore lifeboat into easterly Force 2-3 winds and slight waters.

The lifeboat, with Alan Kelly at the helm and crew members Páidí Breathnach, Catherine Reeves, and Rian Kelly onboard, arrived at the scene at 5:13 pm. Upon assessing the situation, the crew found that the three male casualties were safe and well, all wearing their personal protective equipment (PPE).

As the 20-foot cabin cruiser had sustained mechanical failure, the crew decided to tow it back to Dungarvan harbour. The boats arrived safely back to port at 6:15 pm, thanks to the teamwork of the RNLI Helvick Head volunteers.

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Four boaters in a RIB were rescued by Helvick Head RNLI in County Waterford on Sunday afternoon (7 January) after their boat encountered trouble off the coast of Dungarvan.

The inshore lifeboat was launched into north-east Force 3-4 winds and calm waters, responding to a request from the Irish Coast Guard. The team, led by Alan Kelly and consisting of Páidí Breathnach, Joe Foley and Rian Kelly, arrived at the scene at 2:40 pm and found all the sailors to be safe and well.

The 5.5m rigid inflatable boat had suffered engine failure, and the RNLI team quickly established a tow line and safely brought the boat back to Dungarvan harbour by 4:00 pm.

The Helvick Head Atlantic RNLI lifeboatThe Helvick Head Atlantic RNLI lifeboat

Seán Walsh, the Helvick Head RNLI Launching Authority, reminded boaters to always be prepared before heading out to sea. He emphasized the importance of wearing life jackets and carrying a means of communication and urged anyone in trouble or witnessing someone else in difficulty to call the Coast Guard at 999 or 112.

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Four sailors were rescued by the Helvick Head RNLI on Friday afternoon after they experienced difficulties near Ballinacourty Lighthouse, southeast of Dungarvan.

A member of the public reported the incident to the Irish Coast Guard, who then requested the volunteer crew to launch their inshore lifeboat. The lifeboat, helmed by Joe Foley and with crew members Pat Devereux, Rian Kelly, and Michael Moore onboard, braved westerly Force 2-3 winds and mild seas to reach the scene at 2.30 pm.

Upon arrival, the crew assessed the situation and found the two male and two female casualties to be safe and well, all wearing their personal protective equipment (PPE). However, the 5-metre rigid inflatable boat (RIB) had suffered mechanical failure, prompting the decision to tow it to the nearest safe port. A tow line was established, and the boats safely returned to Helvick Head pier at 3.10 pm.

Nick Hannigan, Helvick Head RNLI Launching Authority, reminded everyone to always be prepared before heading out to sea. "Wear a lifejacket and be sure to carry a means of communication. Should you get into trouble or see someone else in difficulty, don’t hesitate and dial 999 or 112 asking for the Coast Guard," he said.

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Helvick Head RNLI came to the aid of a fisherman on Tuesday afternoon (11 July) after they got into difficulty and needed assistance three miles off Mine Head, southwest of Dungarvan in Co Waterford.

At the request of the Irish Coast Guard, the volunteer crew launched their inshore lifeboat into westerly Force 2-3 winds and moderately choppy seas.

The lifeboat — helmed by Alan Kelly and with crew members Catherine Reeves, Jamie Walsh and Críostóir Ó Faoláin onboard — made its way to the scene, arriving at 12.50pm.

The crew assessed the situation and found the male casualty to be safe and well.

File image of Helvick Head RNLI’s inshore lifeboat | Credit: RNLI/Helvick HeadFile image of Helvick Head RNLI’s inshore lifeboat | Credit: RNLI/Helvick Head

As the 30ft fishing boat had sustained a fouled propeller, it was decided to tow it back to the nearest safe port. A tow line was established, and the lifeboat and fishing boat arrived safely back to Helvick Head pier at 2.25pm.

The fisherman was very appreciative of the service rendered by the Helvick Head RNLI crew and extended his thanks to all involved.

Speaking following the call-out, Kieran Rossiter, Helvick Head RNLI deputy launching authority said: “We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always go prepared. Wear a lifejacket and be sure to carry a means of communication. Should you get into trouble or see someone else in difficulty, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

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Helvick Head RNLI was requested to launch their inshore lifeboat yesterday afternoon (Wednesday, 7 June) following a report that two swimmers were in difficulty off Clonea beach.

With moderate seas and Force 4-5 east/north easterly winds, the volunteer crew launched the ‘Robert Armstrong’ lifeboat at 5.22 pm, for the first time this year, following a request by the Irish Coast Guard who had been alerted by a member of the public. 

The lifeboat, helmed by Alan Kelly and with crew members Paidi Breathnach, Simon O’Hara and Rian Kelly onboard, made its way to the reported location. On arrival at the scene at 5.27 pm, it materialised the two teenagers had been assisted from the water by another member of the public who was helping at a swim class, highly proficient in the water and wearing a buoyancy aid. 

Helvick Head RNLI inshore lifeboat  was launched for the first time this year Photo: John FoleyHelvick Head RNLI inshore lifeboat  was launched for the first time this year Photo: John Foley

Two of the lifeboat crew were tasked by the Coast Guard with swimming ashore to clear the area, which allowed the Waterford-based Rescue 117 helicopter to land safely. With local Gardai also in attendance, the situation was assessed, the casualties were found to be safe and well; however, as a precaution, they were transferred to hospital for observation.

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October's Helvick Head & Dungarvan RNLI Dinner Dance celebrates 25 years of station reopening on the Waterford coast.

The event takes place on October 22nd at the Park Hotel in Dungarvan. 

Tickets are €50 each, including a four-course meal and live music by Deuces Wild. 

It's been a busy season for the Helvick Head RNLI who were called upon twice on the same weekend as it celebrated the 25th anniversary of its reopening in August.

 

 

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Helvick Head RNLI was requested to launch their inshore lifeboat on Tuesday afternoon, 20 September, following a report that a swimmer was in difficulty off Clonea beach.

With calm seas and Force 2-3 south westerly winds, the volunteer crew launched the ‘Robert Armstrong’ lifeboat at 5.35 pm following a request by the Irish Coast Guard. It followed a report from a member of the public that a swimmer was in difficulty near Ballinclamper, the southern end of Clonea beach.

The lifeboat, helmed by Alan Kelly and with crew members Joe Foley and Simon O’Hara onboard, made its way to the reported location arriving on scene at 5.40 pm. However, the lifeboat was stood down as it transpired the male swimmer was snorkelling in the area and did not require any assistance. 

Speaking following the call out, John Condon, Helvick Head RNLI Deputy Launching Authority, said: ‘This call out turned out to be a false alarm with good intent, but we would commend the person who raised the alarm, reporting what they perceived as someone in difficulty. It is always better to be safe than sorry, safety is always our priority.’

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Helvick Head RNLI in Co Waterford was called upon twice on the same weekend as it celebrated the 25th anniversary of its reopening.

The first callout was during a bright and sunny Saturday afternoon (20 August), when lifeboat volunteers were paged at 4.30pm to give onshore assistance to a beachgoer with a leg injury at Helvick Head cove.

The female tourist had sustained a dislocated knee while sitting on the rocks and was supported by a number of crew members until an ambulance arrived.

She was treated on scene by paramedics before being transferred to hospital and later released to recover at home.

A family member visited the station the following day to thank all involved as it materialised that this was not the first time the casualty had encountered the lifeboat services.

Over 20 years ago, she had been one of a number of children cut off by the tide at Faill an Staicin beach and subsequently rescued by the lifeboat crew.

The following day (Sunday 21 August), Helvick Head RNLI were celebrating the 25th anniversary of the reopening of the station with an open day to recognise its relationships with other local emergency services.

While conducting an exercise in front of local crowds, alongside the crews of Naval Service vessel LÉ George Bernard Shaw, the Irish Coast Guard’s Waterford-based helicopter Rescue 117 and Youghal RNLI, the volunteer lifeboat was redirected at 3.52pm at the request of the coastguard.

It followed a report that an 18-foot pleasure boat had broken down in Dungarvan Bay.

The lifeboat — helmed by Richard Haines and with crew members Alan Kelly, Pat Devereux and Rian Kelly onboard — made its way to the reported location through choppy waters and Force 3-4 northwesterly winds.

Once on scene, the crew assessed the situation and found the three male casualties to be safe and well. As the boat had sustained engine failure, a decision was made to tow it back to Helvick Head pier.

Speaking following the callout, John Condon, Helvick Head RNLI deputy launching authority said: “The casualties did the right thing by calling for help when they realised they were in difficulty.

“We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always go prepared. Wear a lifejacket and be sure to carry a means of communication. Should you get into trouble or see someone else in difficulty, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

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Helvick Head RNLI went to assist two children today (Tuesday 19 July) at Clonea Beach after they were swept out to sea on an inflatable.

With Force 2-3 north westerly winds and calm seas, the volunteer crew launched their inshore lifeboat at the request of the Irish Coast Guard at 12.17pm 

The lifeboat helmed by Alan Kelly and with crew members Paidi Breathnach, Cathal Reilly and Pat Devereaux onboard, launched at 12.25pm and headed north of the An Rinn peninsula.

On arrival at the scene, the two casualties had been rescued by the Clonea Beach lifeguard team so the lifeboat crew stood by and monitored the situation until everyone was safely back on shore.

Speaking following the call out, Sean Walsh, Helvick Head RNLI Deputy Launching Authority said: ‘Thankfully all’s well that ends well and we would like to wish the children well and commend the Clonea Beach lifeguard team for their efforts in bringing them to safety.

‘While inflatables can be great fun, we would advise that you don’t take them to the beach as they are not designed for open water and it can take very little breeze for them to be swept out to sea - much quicker than you can swim or paddle back to the shore. Should you get into trouble or see someone else in difficulty, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.

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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

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