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Displaying items by tag: IOM Steam Packet

Senior figures in the Isle of Man Steam Packet Co.,who between them have amassed more than half a century of dedicated service to the Manx ferry company are to retire later this year.

Chief Executive Officer Mark Woodward and Commercial Director John Watt will both stand down from their roles in July 2021.

Well-respected by colleagues ashore and afloat, they have collectively chalked up 58 years during which time they have overseen a number of changes, including the acquisition of the IOM Steam-Packet by the Manx government and managing the detailed operation to secure a new purpose-built vessel, which is due to come into service in 2023.

Mark Woodward joined the Company in 1989 as Management Accountant, moving to Operations in 1995. He succeeded the late Hamish Ross as Chief Executive Officer in 2007.

At the helm for the past 14 years, during which time the Company has gone from strength-to-strength, his extensive knowledge and experience have proved invaluable, creating a strong long-term platform to deliver continued investment in sea services that meets the needs of the Island.

He commented: ‘I have been contemplating retirement for a year or so now. While I was pleased in December to be asked to stay for a few more years, ultimately the glimpse of freedom offered by working from home last year led to my final decision. I have steered the Company through both calm seas and choppy waters for 14 years now and I am happy it will be in safe hands under the Chairmanship of Lars Ugland.

‘I will, of course, miss all my colleagues and the camaraderie in the office. It has been a genuine pleasure and an honour to work for such a vital and historic Company.’

John Watt moved to the Company in 1995 and joined the Board of Directors eight years later. During his tenure, the number of passenger sailings have more than doubled, while average fares paid have halved in real terms.

He said: ‘It has been a privilege to serve this great Company over a fascinating period in its long history. In that time, fast craft has replaced conventional tonnage in some areas, special offers rather than standard fares have become the norm, the number of Liverpool services has virtually trebled and Heysham passenger services have doubled. It has been a real pleasure working for such an important Company and with such friendly and professional colleagues.’

Chairman Lars Ugland added: ‘I’d like to place on record our gratitude for both Mark and John’s long service and acknowledge the fine contribution they have made.

‘Under Mark’s leadership, the Company has made great strides to provide what is best for our Island, stabilising the long-term future of sea services for the Isle of Man and its people.

‘His quick intelligence, huge experience, sense of humour and loyalty have made him an excellent Chief Executive and he has offered a constant wise counsel, always with the best interests of the Company and the Isle of Man at heart. He will be much missed by me, the staff and the Board.

‘Likewise, John’s diligent and efficient manner has served us well and he too will be greatly missed, both on a personal level as well as for his contribution to the Company's success.’

Published in Ferry

Ferry operator the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company will officially mark its 190th anniversary on Tuesday (tomorrow).

It's the world’s oldest continually-operating passenger shipping company and has served the Island since 30 June 1830.

The Steam Packet, reports Manx Radio, started with a wooden paddle steamer known as Mona's Isle, built at a cost of £7,052, which was launched from Glasgow after being built on the River Clyde.

After arriving in Douglas, her maiden passenger crossing from the Isle of Man took place in mid-August that year.

To celebrate the milestone the Packet's fleet, decked in bunting, will sound its whistles in Douglas Harbour at 6pm on tomorrow evening (30 June).

Published in Ferry

The Isle of Man Steam Packet's fastferry, Manannan is to remain in Manx waters this winter.

According to EnergyFM, the passenger /vehicle craft concluded the 2019 season earlier this month, maintaining a 100% technical reliability record during the whole summer, according to the company.

Completing 759 sailings and travelling 51,777 nautical miles, the high-speed ferry also operated a 98.15% punctuality record, as the season drew to a close.

Manannan will now be moored in Douglas Harbour before undergoing an annual overhaul ahead of services resuming on 27th March next year.

Click here for more details.

Published in Ferry

The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company wants public opinion on a new ship. 

The ferry operator reports Manx Radio, wants to know your thoughts, as it prepares for 'major investment in its fleet'.

The company has plans to replace the Ben-my-Chree with a purpose-built ship, designed and constructed over the next three years.

Passengers past, present and future are invited to submit their views, specifically relating to on-board facility preferences, through a survey (click here) which is being hosted by Island Global Research.

For more click here. 

Published in Ferry

A completion date for the new £38m Liverpool landing stage for Isle of Man ferries has been delayed.

According to IOMToday, it will be in the summer, as the completion date for the ferry terminal was given as February 2021, but that has been put back to July of that year.

However, Infrastructure Minister Ray Harmer said he was hoping it would be ready for the TT, which gets under way at the end of May.

The delay was due to the discharge of planning conditions and some legal agreements taking ’longer than anticipated’, he said.

It was also revealed that dredging is required for the project which Afloat adds will see the Isle of Man Steam Packet use the new terminal. 

For more on this development click here. 

Published in Ferry

In an aim to introduce electric vehicle charging points, a campaign has been set up to apply this on board ferries of the Isle of Man Steam Packet.

David Dorricott from the Mountain View Innovation Centre based outside the (harbour town of Ramsey) wants people to be able to 'charge whilst you cross'.

He says the Island is behind other nearby companies, which have brought in ferry EV charging. 

For more Manx Radio reports having contacted the Steam Packet Company for a response with a podcast available through this link.

Published in Ferry

According to EnergyFM, the chairman of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company will retire in Spring 2020 after holding his position for over 20 years.

Robert Quayle was appointed as chair in 2008 and was a director of the ferry company for more than two decades.

He will step down from his role on March 31st next year.

Mr Quayle said: ‘It has been a privilege to serve this great Company over a fascinating period in its long history. I have witnessed a number of changes of ownership during that time but the Company has continued to provide a consistent and reliable service to the Island community throughout.'

More here from the radio station. 

Published in Ferry

Ferry firm the Isle of Man Steam Packet made a profit of £9.3m in the year that it was acquired by the Manx government.

But operating profits writes IOMToday, have fallen slightly.

Accounts for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company Group Ltd for the year ending December 31, 2018, will be laid before this week’s Tynwald sitting.

They show profits for the year attributable to equity owners at £9,332,364 compared to £8,421,874 in 2017.

But operating profit, at £10,470,595, was down slightly from £10,813,574 the previous year.

The group was acquired by the Treasury on May 24 last year for a total of £124.7m, represented by debt of £75.9m and equity of £48.8m.

For more here on the accounts of the company. 

Published in Ferry

The Manx government will be required to guarantee the Isle of Man Steam Packet’s loans when it builds its new ferries.

Under the terms of the sea services agreement, the company must provide two new ships, with the first due to be in service in 2022.

In a Treasury report, due to be presented to Tynwald (Manx Parliament) on the refinancing of the £76m the company owes the taxpayer, it is also revealed that a government guarantee on the loans for new boats will be required.

The section of the report titled ’Additional Company Debt’ details the necessity for new ships and that ’it will require borrowing’.

For more the IOMToday reports here.  

Published in Ferry

IOMToday writes that arm’s-length Manx government-owned ferry operations such as the Isle of Man Steam Packet could become subject to Freedom of Information laws.

Minister for Policy and Reform Chris Thomas says that transparency when public money is involved is important, but must be balanced against commercial confidentiality.

The issue of arm’s-length companies and FoI requests was highlighted when the Positive Action Group submitted a request in relation to the Steam Packet which was rejected.

The PAG asked the government’s Department of Infrastructure for ’figures for the carbon emissions of the Steam Packet fleet (for both the Manannan and the Ben-my-Chree individually) per kilometre, per mile or per journey’.

However, this was rejected as the Department of Infrastructure does not hold that information.

The DoI said in its response: ’You may already be aware that the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company is not subject to Freedom of Information, although they may be open to a dialogue on the subject if you approach them direct.’

In response to this, Mr Thomas told the Isle of Man Examiner that he personally thinks that FoI might need to be ’tailored for arm’s-length operations, in several variants for each of the types of public bodies that currently exist or might come to exist’.

The Manx government bought the Steam Packet last year for £124 million and to read more on the FoI related story click here. 

Published in Ferry
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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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