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Displaying items by tag: LE Samuel Beckett

#LESamuelBeckett – The Naval Service newest newbuild OPV L.E. Samuel Beckett (P61) this week has undergone her shipbuilders sea-trails in the Bristol Channel, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 1,900 tonnes OPV90 class 'enhanced Roisin class' which cost  €49m was floated-out in November, carried out sea-trials and among her route included a call offshore of Ifracombe on the North Devon coast and around Lundy Island.

She returned yesterday to her builders, Babcock Marine in Appledore which is approached through the estuary of where the rivers Taw and Torridge meet. The shipyard is sited on the muddy tidal banks of the Torridge, which flows downriver from nearby Bideford.

Published in Navy

#SamuelBeckett – At first glance L.E. Samuel Beckett (P61), the first of a pair of longer (90m) newbuild OPV's which was floated-out at Babcock Marine's Appledore shipyard in November, displays a notably larger mast compared to her predecessors, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Images of the €49m L.E. Samuel Beckett reported on the North Devon Gazette, show her leaving the enclosed shipyard on 3 November and berth alongside the tidal quay of the north Devon facility. It is understood that work on her sister, L.E. James Joyce (P62) started the following day.

Since these photos of L.E. Samuel Beckett were taken, the fitting of the mast between the funnel and the wheelhouse has been added (see photo) and this this mainmast is covered in rather than the lattice structure of L.E.Niamh (P52) see photo. She is the last ship built for the navy and is seen berthed at the Naval Service base at Haulbowline, Cork Harbour.

L.E. Samuel Beckett has new state-of-the-art technology features among them robotic submersibles and a historic first for the navy, drones or "unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles".

She is an enhanced version of the 78m long 'leadship' class the L.E. Roisin (P51) and sister L.E. Niamh (P52) which are themselves based on a design from STX Canada Marine (formerly Kvaerner Masa Marine).

The all-steel hull (see L.E. Niamh in rough weather) is based on the Mauritian Vigilant patrol vessel launched in 1995, but without the helicopter deck and hangar facilities. The newbuilds are designed with longer hulls for better sea-keeping qualities so to cope better in rough sea states particularly those in the Atlantic. 

As of previous reports, L.E. Samuel Beckett was then expected to be delivered to the Naval Service base in Cork this month or at least within the first quarter of 2014.

In the meantime, her direct predecessor, the former OPV L.E. Emer (P21) which was decommissioned last year following a service of more than 35 years, still remains in Cork Dockyard for new Nigerian owners, Uniglobe Group who plan to use her on the Niger Delta.

 

Published in Navy

#NavalNEWBUILDS – L.E. Samuel Beckett, the first of a pair of newbuild OPV vessels under construction for the Naval Service was expected to be floated-out next month, however this has been re-scheduled to November, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported last Friday's edition of 'Seascapes' exclusively featured a recorded  interview of Commodore Mark Mellett, Flag Officer Commanding of the Naval Service, who spoke of the floating-out of the first new offshore patrol vessel.

According to the Naval Service, it now transpires that the OPV to be named L.E. Samuel Beckett will instead be floated-out in November, though this remains subject to a variety of circumstances among them the state of the tide.

The north Devon shipyard near Bideford is located at Appledore on the muddy banks of the river Torridge which is close to the confluence of the Taw river. Together they form an estuary that flows into the Bristol Channel with up to a 9m tidal range.

L.E. Samuel Beckett is scheduled to be delivered in early 2014 and the second newbuild OPV, L.E. James Joyce is to be delivered a year apart in early 2015. The order for the pair of PV90 class vessels are worth €99m and the work is contracted to Babcock Marine.

The same shipyard, albeit under different ownership had built the PV80 class or 'Roisin' pair which are a design derivitive for the newbuilds currently undergoing construction. Primarily the PV90 class will have an extended hull of 10 metres totalling 90 metres so to improve sea-keeping characteristics particularly in the Atlantic.

Notably the PV90's are to feature drones or "unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles" and robotic submersibles.

It is understood that the afterdeck will have additional space compared to L.E. Roisin (P51) and L.E. Niamh (P52) in that modular units (i.e containers) can be stowed for purposes of overseas missions.

As previously reported, the newbuilds will make a break from tradition in the choice of vessel names are taken from Irish 'male' Nobel-prize winning writers rather than 'female' names based from Celtic mythical figures.

 

Published in Navy
Page 4 of 4

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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