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A revolutionary newbuild multi-purpose cargo vessel, E-Ship 1, docked at Dublin port for the first time today writes Jehan Ashmore. The vessel had arrived from Emden, Germany with a cargo of wind-turbines bound for a project in Leinster.

At both the fore and aft of the new vessel stands a pair of giant metal circular towers which gives the ship a highly distinctive profile. Each of the four rotor tower "sails" are 25 metres high and four metres wide and these towers are driven by electro-motors which together with the wind harness wind energy to provide thrust for the 12,810 gross tonnes vessel. The ship does retain a conventional engine plant below deck and a streamlined superstructure and sleek hull to
reduce drag.

With all these innovative features, E-Ship 1 derives its project name from the enviromental ethos of her owners, Enercon, one of the leading manufacturers of wind-turbine technolgy. The newbuild is also termed the "Turbo-Sail Freighter" which apart from using wind energy to cut down fuel costs and measures to reduce emissions, there is also a double hull to lessen pollution from oil pollution incidents.

The origins for the concept of the E-Ship 1 is not new. In 1852 the Magnus Effect was invented and is named after the works of German physicist, Heinrich Gustav Magnus. The Magnus effect is a force acting on a spinning body in a moving airstream, which acts perpendicularly to the direction of the airstream; in essence when applied to ships, propels the vessel forward.

Another, German, the engineer, Anton Flettner adapted the concept in 1925 with the first rotor vessel, Buckau, a former schooner that was refitted with rotors driven by an electric propulsion system. On several North Sea voyages, the rotors performed well, despite stormy seas, though the technology was not deemed successful enough as the conventional engines were still more efficient and with the low fuel costs remained cheaper to operate.

With the threat of global warming, times have changed dramatically and the need for the concept of the Flettner's rotor-sailing ship has come full-circle with the launch of E-Ship 1 in 2008. Using the latest technology developed for E-Ship 1, Enercon carried out extensive sea-trials last year and first sailed commercially this year.

E-Ship 1 was firstly built at the German shipbuilder Lindenau-Werft, but the yard was declared insolvency. This led to the newbuild to be towed in January 2009 to and completed by the Cassens Werft in Emden.

Enercon was founded in 1984 and has since installed over 16,000 wind turbines in over 30 countries. The specially designed ship will be able to continue transporting wind turbines and components worldwide in addition to heavy lift-cargoes, containers and dry cargoes. The E Ship 1 is due to depart Dublin on Wednesday.

Stern

(Below) The revolutionary rotor-sail, wind energy concept newbuild, E-Ship 1 at Dublin on 10 August and (Above) Stern-view of E-Ship 1 with aft-rotor sails and stern-ramp Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

revo1

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

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