Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: New Ferry

As Afloat previously reported plans for a newbuild ferry to be named Manxman and due for delivery in 2023 replacing Ben-my-Chree, are progressing well according to the Isle of Man Steam Packet.

The detailed design of both the external and internal features of Manxman are currently being undertaken by a team of experts. This vital phase is the longest and where some of the most important decisions are made.

A range of work will take place over a period of around 12 months, including the development of a 3D detailed design drawing of the vessel, as well as construction drawings to allow the vessel to be built. In addition, interior design and internal layouts will be finalised and vessel equipment and machinery agreed.

Despite the ongoing impact of the pandemic, significant progress has been made over the last 12 months. In July, it was announced that the vessel will be built at Hyundai Mipo Dockyard (HMD) in South Korea, one of the world’s major shipbuilders and a leading blue chip name in the industry.

In December, after much deliberation and taking the views of the public into consideration, it was revealed that the new vessel will be named Manxman. More than 7,500 people submitted their favourite from the shortlist of names, the results of which played a key part in the selection process.

Isle of Man Steam Packet Company Chief Executive Mark Woodward said: ‘We are pleased with how plans are progressing and that, despite the pandemic, we have largely been able to stay on schedule and continue to make significant progress. It is a large-scale project which naturally takes time and many hours of meticulous planning, however we are excited to move forward with the detailed design of Manxman.’

There are many stages involved in the process which the Steam Packet Company covers in detail in its two-part blog series, Designing & Constructing a Vessel.

Part one looks at what is involved in the planning, design and construction of a bespoke ferry and the different steps involved in the process.

As for Part two, this provides a unique insight into how long the whole process usually takes, the types of specialist organisations it will be working with and the challenges the ferry company faces over the next few years.

Published in Ferry

The newest Stena Line ferry on the Irish Sea made its inaugural crossing on the Belfast-Birkenhead (Liverpool) service last night and as Afloat adds this follows a debut albeit temporarily on the Rosslare-Cherbourg route to enable extra capacity.

Stena Embla joined another E-Flexer ro-pax class Stena Edda on the popular Belfast – Liverpool route with the capacity to carry 1,000 passengers, 120 cars and with 3,100 freight lane meters.

The Chinese built newbuild will increase the Belfast – Liverpool service freight capacity by 20% and raise passenger capacity by 33%.

Paul Grant, Stena Line’s Irish Sea Trade Director said: “Stena Embla will make one daily return trip between Belfast and Liverpool. We have now invested over £400m in our ferries and port facilities on the Irish Sea in recent years. The Belfast-Liverpool route is one of the most popular Irish Sea crossings for both freight and leisure traffic so having a second vessel of the calibre of Stena Embla, with a host of high-quality passenger facilities, will further increase its appeal and expand our capacity. In March 2020 we launched our new build Stena Edda onto the Belfast-Liverpool service and the feedback from our freight and leisure customers was extremely positive.

He added "Now we will have two ships offering identical services and facilities which will help take our service levels on the route to new heights. We have real confidence in the future of our Belfast services and our Irish Sea routes in general, which is why this region has attracted three brand new ships in the last 12 months alone.”

Published in Ferry

Stena Embla the latest Chinese newbuild 'E-Flexer' class ropax completed a month-long delivery voyage to Europe where the ferry is to join sisters on the Irish Sea, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 40,050 gross tonnage newbuild built in Weihai, was tracked by Afloat.ie on the evening of New Year's Day in the Celtic Sea heading into the Irish Sea bound for Holyhead, Wales to where a brief call was made in the early hours of the next day before proceeding to Belfast Harbour. The new ferry berthed at the port's VT2 terminal.

The last port of call during Stena Embla's long delivery voyage was the southern Spanish port of Algerciras, opposite of Gibraltar, having called previously via Singapore, Sri Lanka and then a transit of the Suez Canal.

The Spanish call was to enable 'bunkers' transferred from a small tanker. On a related note, at the same time Stena Embla was tracked in the Celtic Sea, another tanker, Lizrix from Falmouth, was anchored off Rosslare Europort prior to entering the Wexford port to refuel Stena Horizon serving on the Cherbourg route.

The French service was recently boosted in freight capacity as the ro-ro Stena Foreteller took up service before Christmas which was earlier than planned to tomorrow's original start-up date. This was due to a major surge in demand from hauliers to arrive in mainland Europe and avoid customs checks of a post-Brexit UK.

While there is much attention to yesterday's newest 'Brexit-buster' route to Dunkirk operated by DFDS, Stena will introduce Stena Embla as the second E-Flexer on the Irish Sea between Belfast and Birkenhead (Liverpool). The new ferry has a capacity for 1,000 passengers, 120 cars and 3,100 lane metres of freight.

The other E-Flexer is Stena Edda along with Stena Mersey currently operates the 8 hour route. Each of the E-Flexers, have 40% more deck capacity, 40% more cabins and 30% more fuel-efficient than the Stena Mersey which will be replaced by the newbuild.

Stena Mersey along with former fleetmate and sister Stena Lagan (lenghtened last year to increase freight capacity), was in March replaced by the the E-Flexer, Stena Edda. Both of the 'river' theme named ropax vessels will be reunited when work also to enlarge Stena Mersey is due for completion next summer. At that stage, both the pair will have been renamed to reflect a deployment to a Baltic Sea route for the same operator.

As for the third E-Flexer on the Irish Sea, this is the leadship of the class Stena Estrid which entered service almost a year ago on the Dublin-Holyhead route. This winter the ferry was on relief duty between Belfast-Birkenhead but is back operating routine duties on the premier Irish Sea route.

In total Stena Ro Ro has ordered 9 of the Stena E-Flexer class and all built in China, though last year there was a change of ownership at the shipyard in Weihai.

Three of the newbuilds have been chartered to Brittany Ferries, firstly the Galicia which made a debut in December on UK-Spain service whereas DFDS will receive their E-flexer on the short-sea Dover-Calais service this year.

Published in Ferry

A new ferry will be Ireland's largest domestic passenger ferry when the 40-metre 'Saoirse na Farraige' arrives in Galway Bay this October.

As Independent.ie writes the ferry constructed in Hong Kong with a capacity of 400, is expected to enter service next April with Aran Island Ferries.

It will operate from Rossaveel, Co Galway to all three Aran Islands, taking 45-minutes to reach Inis Mór, 50 minutes to Inis Meáin and 55 minutes to Inis Oírr, the company says.

'Saoirse na Farraige' is the sixth ship for a company owned by the O'Brien family of Connemara, who first began carrying passengers to the Aran Islands on a Galway Hooker, under sail, decades ago.

"We know it’s an extremely difficult time for businesses in many sectors (ours included), but we hope this will brighten up Galwegians’ spirits and that when we travel again, the ferry will have a positive impact on tourism in the west of Ireland," said Sales and Marketing Manager, Áine McLoughlin.

For furthermore on this newbuild ferry click here. 

Published in Ferry

The newest Stena Line roll-on/roll-off passenger ferry which arrived in Belfast Harbour from China (as Afloat reported) ahead of being put into service on the Irish Sea next month, has undergone rigorous checks for coronavirus.

The Stena Edda, which has been six years in planning and construction, will operate on the Belfast to (Birkenhead) Liverpool route, replacing the Stena Lagan.

It was built at the AVIC Weihai Shipyard in north-eastern China, which is 1,000 miles from the Wuhan province, where the coronavirus outbreak has its origins.

The Irish News reports that it emerged since the vessel left Weihai four weeks ago, it has undergone a series of checks along the route to ensure it is carrying no traces of the potentially deadly virus.

To read more including a response from the ferry operator click here.

Published in Ferry

The brand new 'next generation' ropax ferry Stena Edda for the first time arrived into Belfast Harbour this morning following a 10,500 mile delivery voyage from China, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Afloat also tracked the Chinese built Stena Line E-Flexer ropax class yesterday at anchor in Belfast Lough having sailed up the Irish Sea. Following an overnight anchorage the 40,000 gross tonnage ferry made a maiden arrival in Belfast Port this morning having docked at the VT2 terminal for berthing trials.

Stena Edda is understood to enter the Belfast-Birkenhead (Liverpool) route next month and will become amongst the most environmentally sustainable vessels in the Irish Sea. At 215 metres in length, Stena Estrid is larger than today’s standard ropax vessels, with space to carry 120 cars and 1,000 passengers, and a freight capacity of 3,100 lane meters. This will be a boost to the route as there is a 50 per cent increase in freight tonnage.

Introduction of Stena Edda will also result in the direct replacement of Stena Lagan. In addition another new sister, Stena Embla is also to debut on the Irish Sea route ultimately leading in the withdrawal of the route's second ship sister, Stena Mersey.

In order to accommodate the E-Flexers, a new double tier berth linkspan has been installed in Belfast Harbour. While in Birkenhead, further adaptive works as Afloat previously reported began at the Twelve Quays River Terminal on Merseyside. The route is the longest on the Irish involving a 8-hour passage time.

Already in service on the Irish Sea is the leadship of the E-Flexer class, Stena Estrid which entered on the Dublin-Holyhead route last month.

Published in Ferry

The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company wants public opinion on a new ship. 

The ferry operator reports Manx Radio, wants to know your thoughts, as it prepares for 'major investment in its fleet'.

The company has plans to replace the Ben-my-Chree with a purpose-built ship, designed and constructed over the next three years.

Passengers past, present and future are invited to submit their views, specifically relating to on-board facility preferences, through a survey (click here) which is being hosted by Island Global Research.

For more click here. 

Published in Ferry

The number of visitors to Spike Island has risen to 25% so far in 2019, with the operation of a new, larger-capacity ferry just one of a number of developments at the Cork Harbour destination.

The new ferry, reports EchoLive.ie, is the 126-seater Spike Island which has been operating since Friday, April 19.

As a result, the busiest day for Easter 2019 was up 50% on Easter 2018, according to a report from the Tourism Directorate of Cork County Council.

“The Spike Island … is more comfortable with a larger capacity that the Bryan J, which was used previously,” the report said.

“The new contract with Doyle Shipping Group provides for the use of both vessels, which will significantly increase capacity to transfer tourists between Cobh and the Island.”

More on the story can be read here. 

Published in Ferry

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating