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Displaying items by tag: Ringaskiddy

A massive development in the Port of Cork of a new container handling terminal at Ringaskiddy, is almost complete and, when operational, will future-proof the transit of imports and exports for Ireland.

Work on the €86m project - the biggest single investment ever made by the Port of Cork - started in 2018. It has been a huge undertaking, involving the dredging of 285,000 tonnes of silt and rock, the laying of 92,000 sq m of concrete and the development of 2kms of new roads at the 150-acre site.

A lot of the silt was buried at sea, close to Roche's Point, under an EPA licence, while most of the rock was ground up and used for infill at the site.

Jim Murphy, project and development engineer with the Port of Cork, explained that the new 360m-long quay (equipped with STS gantry cranes) had a 13m depth of water, meaning it is capable of handling the biggest container ships in the world.

“They are typically 300m long and 16 containers wide. The containers are 40ft long each and the Ringaskiddy terminal will be able to handle 280,000 of these containers every year,” Mr Murphy said.

Port of Cork's new gantry cranes Photo: Bob BatemanPort of Cork's new gantry cranes Photo: Bob Bateman

This is approximately 40,000 more containers than can be handled (upriver) at Tivoli, where operations will start to be phased out once Ringaskiddy is fully up and running.

Further Irish Examiner coverage of the port project here.

Published in Port of Cork

Haulbowline Island Amenity Park in Ringaskiddy will be open to the public from tomorrow, Friday 15 January, Co Cork’s mayor has confirmed.

The park includes 4km of harbour-side walkways, a 1km jogging circuit and numerous seating areas to stop and take in the views of Cork Harbour.

It has also been extensively landscaped with wildflower areas and more than 200 trees, and is rich with biodiversity and wildlife.

Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Mary Linehan Foley welcomed the opening of the park and noted the value of safe areas for outdoor recreation, which are especially welcome at these times.

“Covid-19 restrictions have seen a huge uptake in people using our parks, beaches and greenways to get exercise within their 5km,” she said.

“Haulbowline Island Amenity Park will be a fantastic asset, particularly to the people of Ringaskiddy and the immediate surrounding area.

“People living outside 5km from the park will have to wait to visit Haulbowline but it will be worth the wait for the spectacular views of Cork Harbour.”

Cork County Council chief executive Tim Lucey noted the level of transformation that has taken place in the development of the park.

“The most innovative and customised solutions have been applied throughout with spectacular end results: excellent amenities and the establishment of woodlands and wildflower areas,” he said.

A spokesperson for Ringaskiddy and District Residents Association welcomed the opening of the park and highlighted the value of this amenity to local residents noting that “any environmentally-friendly recreational amenities are most welcome and long overdue for our community”.

Haulbowline Island Amenity Parkis gated and will be open to the public daily from 9am to 4.30pm in the winter months, with spring and summer hours to be decided.

Published in Cork Harbour

Yesterday’s fire at a grain storage facility in Ringaskiddy was the third such incident in the past fourth months, firefighters have said.

According to The Irish Times, concerns have been brewing as it emerged that local residents learned of the blaze from the media rather than the Port of Cork and Cork County Council’s notification system.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the fire at the Ringaskiddy deepwater port on Saturday (9 January) sent a huge plume of smoke into the air over Cork Harbour and saw shipping operations suspended for much of the day.

Despite the risk of a dust explosion, the fire was quickly brought under control and no injuries were reported.

But the blaze — fuelled by what the council described as “natural, organic animal feed” — caused extensive damage to the R&H Hall depot.

And area residents were advised to close their windows to protect from smoke and fumes, prompting concern from local campaigners against a proposed incinerator for the Cork Harbour village.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

As Afloat reported in July, the new public recreation area at Paddy's Point in Cork Harbour now has a new floating pontoon added to the existing marine leisure facilities at Ringaskiddy.

As it turns out, the new facilities were about to be put to championship use in August to handle a fleet at the Laser National Championships until the event had to be cancelled by Royal Cork Yacht Club due to COVID concerns. 

The pier and slipway, that opened in May 2019 is located adjacent to the Beaufort Building in Ringaskiddy and is managed and maintained by the Port of Cork.

The substantial new facilities replace the existing Ringaskiddy slipway and pier and were completed as part of the Cork container terminal development.

The 'Paddy's Point' Pontoon jetty in Cork HarbourThis new marine leisure facility is free for the public to use and includes a pontoon to launch leisure craft Photo: Bob Bateman

These latest photos of Paddy's Point further illustrate what a fine structure is now in situ and what a welcome addition it is to Cork Harbour's marine infrastructure. 

Published in Cork Harbour

The new public recreation area at Paddy's Point in Cork Harbour now has a new floating pontoon added to the existing marine leisure facilities at Ringaskiddy.

The pier and slipway, that opened in May 2019 is located adjacent to the Beaufort Building in Ringaskiddy and is managed and maintained by the Port of Cork.

The substantial new facilities replace the existing Ringaskiddy slipway and pier and were completed as part of the Cork container terminal development.

This new marine leisure facility is free for the public to use and includes a pontoon to launch leisure craft and a secure trailer park along with picnic benches in a landscaped area for all to enjoy.

Paddy's Point new Marine Leisure facilties in Cork Harbour at Ringaskiddy Photo: Bob BatemanPaddy's Point new Marine Leisure facilties in Cork Harbour at Ringaskiddy Photo: Bob Bateman

Published in Cork Harbour

The assembling of ship-to-shore (STS) cranes has begun at the Port of Cork's new Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy. 

The new Liebherr cranes according to the port company, will improve liners’ schedule reliability, and reduce trade costs and inventory holding outlays for shippers

In an announcement yesterday, the Port said it has taken delivery of two Liebherr post-panamax size (STS) container gantry cranes at the Cork Container Terminal. The assembly process has commenced on site and is due to be completed in the coming weeks.

The Port of Cork is the second largest port in the Republic of Ireland in terms of turnover. In 2019 the port handled total container traffic of 240,000 TEU. Thanks in part to the new Liebherr STS cranes, this is expected to increase by more than37% to approximately 330,000 TEU over the next decade in Cork Container Terminal.

Henry Kingston, Port Engineering Manager of the Port of Cork, said: “Liebherr Container Cranes in Killarney have been working with the Port of Cork for more than 50 years, and their port cranes, ship-to-shore container cranes, and rubber tyre gantry cranes (RTG) have been integral to making us the most seamless trade gateway in Ireland. Our first-hand experience of the top quality of Liebherr products and the first class after sales service back-u were key factors in influencing the decision to choose Liebherr for this project. In 2012, the Port of Cork and Liebherr collaborated in pioneering the very first fully electrically powered E-RTG crane in Ireland which has proven to be super reliable, as well as environmentally best in class.”

CCT will soon become a major enabler of growth for Cork city and Munster as well as the national economy. The funding for this development has come from Allied Irish Banks plc (AIB), the European Investment Bank (EIB), and the Ireland Strategic Investment Fund (ISFI), European Connecting Europe Facility Funds as well as self-finance, and these STS cranes will be core contributors to CCT’s growth in the 2020s and beyond.

The cranes were built less than 100 kilometres from Cork in Killarney, County Kerry, and are being assembled by local crane erection specialists William O’Brien Group., under the supervision of expert Liebherr engineers. Liebherr Container Cranes Ltd. is part of the Liebherr group and supplies container handling equipment to ports and rail terminals worldwide.

David Griffin Managing Director – Sales, Liebherr Container Cranes, said, “Port of Cork has a well-established reputation for fast ship turnarounds and facilitating efficient supply chains, so Liebherr was very satisfied to be the preferred choice to meet the Port’s high standards. These new cranes are fitted with the latest energy saving Liebherr Liduro drives, power management systems and safety features available in today’s STS crane markets. The cranes will have an outreach of 45m, a back reach of 15m and a lift height over rail of 32m, ensuring that they will have the lift and reach capacity to cater for the largest container vessels which will visit Cork in the coming decades.”

“Liebherr Container Cranes are industry leaders in terms of their high reliability, low downtimes and low maintenance and running costs, and will serve Cork Container Terminal well into the future.”

The contract was awarded to Liebherr in 2018 after a public tender process, and the opening of CCT later this year will deliver the fastest, most reliable, and cost-efficient container service available to local businesses as well as Ireland’s international exporters.

Construction on CCT began in June 2019 and will finish in 2020. The €80m project will initially offer a 360-metre-long quay with a 13-metre depth alongside. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings.

Published in Port of Cork

A citizen group based in Cork which is against a planned incinerator in Ringaskiddy has criticised Indaver Ireland’s application for an emission licence despite a pending court judgment on the validity of planning permission.

As GreenNews.ie reports, Cork Harbour Alliance for a Safe Environment (CHASE) said that it has been recently informed by Indaver of its plans to proceed with an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“Indaver are obviously presuming that their permission will stand in advance of any High Court decision, which we believe is a premature assumption,” Mary O’Leary, Chairperson of CHASE said.

Ms O’Leary reiterated the group’s concerns about the health implications of living near an incinerator, reasoning that scientific studies have shown that “particles coming out of incinerators are more toxic than for other combustion processes”.

A new study carried out by Chinese researchers has revealed that fine particles emitting from urban waste-to-energy plants can“contain high amount of toxic compounds and pose a serious threat to environment and human health”.

The High Court commenced hearing the controversial incinerator case earlier in March with no final judgment issued yet.

For further reading on this story click here.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

#ferries - Stowaways were found hiding in a container at the Port of Cork’s Ringaskiddy ferry terminal moments after it arrived off a ship from Spain.

The eight, according to the Irish Examiner, were all Albanian nationals under the age of 24, including a 16-year-old , were found hiding between pallets in a container on the back of a truck which had disembarked the ferry from Santander in northern Spain around 5pm on Monday.

It is the second time in four weeks that stowaways have been found using the same service. Four were found in a container at Santander port earlier this month before the lorry boarded the vessel.

While the crossing takes more than 26 hours, it is understood the men could have been in the container for up to four days. There were signs that they had access to food and water during the crossing. The container was soiled by excrement.

Gardaí and paramedics were alerted and the men were medically assessed. All were in relatively good physical condition but one was treated for mild dehydration. The seven adults were taken into custody by garda immigration officers. Four have since been deported, three remain in custody pending deportation, and the youth is in care pending further enquiries.

A garda spokesman said there is an immigration presence at all arrivals into the State.

The newspaper has more on the story here. 

Published in Ferry

Maritime Journal reports that work has begun on the Port of Cork’s new Cork Container Terminal at Ringaskiddy.

Afloat.ie previously covered the development at its launch last June, where plans were revealed for its first phase of a 300-metre quay with 13-metre depth that will enable larger container ships to berth adjacent to Ringaskiddy’s existing RO-RO ferry terminal.

The €80 million project will also see construction of a 13.5 hectare terminal and associated buildings, plus two ship-to-shore gantry cranes and container handling facilities.

BAM Civil Ltd won the tender for the Cork Harbour development and commenced work on the site in late 2018, following a hiccup involving a reported ‘mistake’ in the tender sums.

Published in Port of Cork

#PortofCork - No slip ups took place yesterday as the largest container ship to ever berth in the Port of Cork's deepwater terminal unloaded a mega cargo of fruit - including millions of bananas.

The MV Polar Costa Rica, reports the Irish Examiner, measures almost twice the length of Páirc Úi Chaoimh, eased past Roche's Point after its 10-day transatlantic voyage and tied up just after 4pm at the port facility in Ringaskiddy.

A huge logistics operation kicked in to unload part of its massive cargo of bananas predominately, but also pineapples and melons, direct from plantations across Central America.

With a deadweight tonnage of 43,600 tonnes, the 230-metre long ocean-going giant was carrying hundreds of huge containers, each containing several pallets which in turn contained dozens of smaller boxes of fruit.

The capacity of the ship - when measured in bananas - is staggering.

To find out more on the importation of bananas and the other perishable products, click here. 

Published in Port of Cork
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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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