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Displaying items by tag: SCUBA Diving

#MARINE WILDLIFE - Sailors, fishermen and SCUBA divers in England's West Country could face "tough new restrictions" if plans for conservation zones in the Irish Sea and around the UK coast go ahead.

According to This Is Cornwall, groups representing water users argue that marine protection plans "would have severe knock-on effects on those who rely on the south west's coastline for employment and leisure".

Alana Murphy of the Royal Yachting Association said: "A lot of the small inshore areas proposed as conservation zones coincide with estuaries and bays that are used by sailors for mooring, or for laying buoys for racing. We are concerned we could lose important sailing areas."

Companies involved in offshore renewable energy have voiced their concerns on the impact of marine reserved on their development, while the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations added that the scale of proposed fishing reserves was too great, and could potentially push commercial fishermen "to other areas which will then get overfished".

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the UK's Wildlife Trusts have expressed dismay that plans to establish Marine Conservation Zones in the Irish Sea and elsewhere have been shelved till at least next year after pressure from fishermen, boaters and other groups.

Published in Marine Wildlife
This week The Irish Times highlights a host of water-based activities that you may not have tried.
From kitesurfing to paddle boarding, urban fishing to SCUBA diving and even moonlight kayaking, there's surely a new experience for everyone from the most veteran sea dog to the driest landlubber.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

This week The Irish Times highlights a host of water-based activities that you may not have tried.

From kitesurfing to paddle boarding, urban fishing to SCUBA diving and even moonlight kayaking, there's surely a new experience for everyone from the most veteran sea dog to the driest landlubber.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
The body of the Irish student backpacker who drowned while scuba diving in Australia recently was returned to her family yesterday.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie 23-year-old Elaine Morrow from Ballintra, Co Donegal, had been on a beginner's diving course off the coast of Queensland on 18 April when she became separated from her group and failed to surface.
The Irish Independent reports that her funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, after a service at Drumholm Parish Church of Ireland in Ballintra.

The body of the Irish student backpacker who drowned while scuba diving in Australia recently was returned to her family yesterday.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, 23-year-old Elaine Morrow from Ballintra, Co Donegal, had been on a beginner's diving course off the coast of Queensland on 18 April when she became separated from her group and failed to surface.

The Irish Independent reports that her funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, after a service at Drumholm Parish Church of Ireland in Ballintra.

Published in Diving
An Irishwoman who drowned while scuba diving in the Whitsunday Islands in Australia has been named, the Irish Examiner reports.
Elaine Morrow, 23, from Ballintra in Co Donegal, had been on a three-day beginners diving course in the island chain, off the coast of Queensland, when she was separated from her group on Monday.
It is believed the woman had been in Australia for almost a year on a working holiday visa.
The Department of Foreign Affairs has contacted the family and offered consular assistance.

An Irishwoman who drowned while scuba diving in the Whitsunday Islands in Australia has been named, the Irish Examiner reports.

Elaine Morrow, 23, from Ballintra in Co Donegal, had been on a three-day beginners diving course in the island chain, off the coast of Queensland, when she was separated from her group on Monday.

It is believed the woman had been in Australia for almost a year on a working holiday visa.

The Department of Foreign Affairs has contacted the family and offered consular assistance.

Published in Diving
Irish musician Paul Brady has confessed to a second love - scuba diving.
The 'Nobody Knows' hitmaker explained to The Irish Times how he had "always felt at home in the water" since a young age, and did his first diving course in 1988.
But frustrated by diving's weather dependancy here, he started going abroad - beginning in the Red Sea in the late 1980s before taking in the world's top diving spots, from Hawaii to the Cayman Islands and Australia.
Brady says he prefers to dive in private groups "off the beaten track" as commercial operators don't often visit the best sites - citing the Great Barrier Reef as an example.
As an experienced diver, he's has his fair share of bumpy moments down below, such as getting caught in a down draght in the Red Sea near Ras Mohammad - but says his training made all the difference.
As for why he loves diving? "It's a bit like floating in air," he says.
Read more of the Irish Times' interview with Paul Brady HERE.

Irish musician Paul Brady has confessed to a second love - scuba diving.

The 'Nobody Knows' hitmaker explained to The Irish Times how he had "always felt at home in the water" since a young age, and did his first diving course in 1988. 

But frustrated by diving's weather dependancy here, he started going abroad - beginning in the Red Sea in the late 1980s before taking in the world's top diving spots, from Hawaii to the Cayman Islands and Australia.

Brady says he prefers to dive in private groups "off the beaten track" as commercial operators don't often visit the best sites - citing the Great Barrier Reef as an example.

As an experienced diver, he's has his fair share of bumpy moments down below, such as getting caught in a down draght in the Red Sea near Ras Mohammad - but says his training made all the difference.

As for why he loves diving? "It's a bit like floating in air," he says.

Read more of the Irish Times' interview with Paul Brady HERE.

Published in Diving
It's that time of year again, dark evenings and looking for a new challenge writes Timmy Carey. Time to find a new sport to take away the winter blues, why not try SCUBA Diving or Snorkelling. Most clubs begin training either in October or February so now is the best time to enquire and give it a try. The shores of Ireland are blessed with a rich variety of marine life and with almost 12,000 shipwrecks around our coast, there is an never ending challenge awaiting. The Irish Underwater Council has almost 100 diving clubs clubs across Ireland affiliated to it and most will be running beginners scuba courses shortly. For further details log in HERE or alternatively ring the Irish Underwater Council head office at 01-2844601

 diveMG_0558

Divers completing a decompression stop after a 40 meter dive to the wreck of the ssFoilia off the Waterford Coast

Published in Diving

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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