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Trainees who made outstanding contributions to the Tall Ships voyages organised in 2022 by the charity Sail Training Ireland were recognised at the Annual Awards Ceremony at the Mansion House, courtesy of Lord Mayor Caroline Conroy (on Saturday, 28th January 2023).

The award winners were among the 546 trainees who sailed on voyages on tall ships last year. Since 2011, 3,000 young people from all backgrounds and abilities have availed of the opportunities provided by Sail Training Ireland (STIrl) to participate in training and self-development programmes. These are designed to offer a change in direction, perspective, attitude, and behaviour leading to self-confidence, motivation, and the acquisition of new skills.

Volunteer  of the Year Anita Oman-Wrynn receiving the award from Lord Mayor of Dublin Caroline Conroy and Sail Training Ireland Chairman, Seamus McLoughlinVolunteer of the Year Anita Oman-Wrynn receiving the award from Lord Mayor of Dublin Caroline Conroy and Sail Training Ireland Chairman, Seamus McLoughlin

“Sail Training Ireland promotes education and youth development through adventure, shared experiences, and challenge by introducing young people to life on a Tall Ship as a platform for personal development. The charity offers this opportunity to young people from all backgrounds and with all abilities. Dublin City Council and Dublin Port Company have been jointly supporting this Charity since the Tall Ships Race Festival in 2012 as a legacy to that festival and the benefits to the community, which it created. I am delighted that the generous contribution from Dublin City Council in 2022 has helped over two hundred young people from Dublin to participate” Lord Mayor of Dublin, Caroline Conroy

Trainees include young people from residential care homes, Garda Diversion Projects, Youth and Community groups and Schools, drug rehabilitation programmes, asylum seekers and young people with additional needs across Ireland.

The highlights of Sail Training Ireland’s programmes in 2023 will include:

  • Erasmus+ Youth Exchange between Ireland and Malta.
  • Two STEM at Sea voyages incorporating science at sea training workshops.
  • Thirty young people from Dublin’s North-East inner city participating as part of the Taoiseach’s taskforce NEIC project.
  • Regional sail training schemes (funded programmes) in Drogheda, Cork, Dublin, Belfast, Wexford, and Waterford.
  • Cross Border voyages including young people North and South.
  • As part of the Ability Voyage project, several wheelchair users will go on board the Tall Ship ‘Tenacious,’ a ship built specifically to cater to those with disabilities.
  • The Government of Ireland (Department of Defence, Dublin City Council and Dublin Port Company continue to support the charity.

“The core aim of Sail Training Ireland is to ensure that all young people across the island of Ireland have access to the life-changing experience of a voyage at sea. 2022 has been a record year with over 546 trainees partaking in thirty voyages on five vessels. The Government funding provided again for 2023 will allow us to offer the opportunity to those who otherwise may not have been able to avail of such a chance. ” - Sail Training Ireland CEO - Daragh Sheridan

Anyone interested in partaking in a voyage or organisations that work with young people that may benefit from such an experience, should contact Sail Training Ireland at www.sailtrainingireland.com, email [email protected], or phone: 01 845 4773

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The Department of Defence will continue to provide funding to Sail Training Ireland for three more years from this year, 2023.

This funding will provide sail training to young persons from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This funding is subject to compliance with two Performance Delivery Agreements, which were entered into between the Department of Defence and Sail Training Ireland.

The two Agreements will provide for; €100,000 to be provided by the Department of Defence in the years 2023, 2024 and 2025.

In addition, €50,000 will be provided in 2023 from the Dormant Accounts Fund.

Provision of this money will be subject to compliance with the Performance Delivery Agreements, particularly the provision of sail training to young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, including young people from Northern Ireland.

Published in Tall Ships

Tall ship Grace O'Malley arriving in Cork Harbour this evening for a weekend visit to Leeside to show herself to the public.

The 164-ft ship is due to be in the city until Tuesday.

As reported in numerous articles in Afloat.ie for many months now, having been bought in Sweden the 164ft (153ft hull length) three-master has been gradually introducing herself to all of Ireland, via the Foyle Maritime Festival, followed by time in Belfast, and then Warrenpoint before coming on south this week under the command of Capt. Gerry Burns to Dublin, where she was berthed at Sir John Rogerson's Quay.

It will be 2023 before the ship has been fully re-configured to accommodate a throughput of a thousand trainees annually. Their learning experiences can be adapted to include much more than traditional sail training in a committed acknowledgement by the AYT that nowadays, tall ships have to be multi-purpose in order to earn their keep.

More on the Grace O'Malley and her tour here

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Underway is National Heritage Week with ongoing events to include The Port of Cork Company (PoCC) which is delighted to host an event celebrating its 250-year history, at The Crawford Art Gallery in Cork, which was built in 1724 as the original Cork’s Custom House.

In commemoration of this heritage, the Port of Cork Company gifted a significant collection of maritime paintings and artefacts, known as The Port of Cork Collection, worth an estimated €1 million to The Crawford Art Gallery in November 2021.

Guests were offered a guided tour of The Port of Cork Collection, to learn about the Port’s history and how it has played a vital role in keeping Cork connected as an international gateway for trade for many centuries.

Speaking at the event, Eoin McGettigan, Chief Executive Officer with PoCC, stated “As a company, we are very proud of our heritage, which spans over 250 years. These unique maritime artworks, by renowned artists, offer a fascinating insight into the operations of Cork Harbour at that time and underscore The Port of Cork’s long-standing international significance for commerce and trade."

He added "not only does the collection signify the history of our great port and harbour, but it also showcases how far the port has come, in terms of leisure, operations, scale and trade. We are delighted this collection has found such a welcoming home at The Crawford Art Gallery over the past 6 months.”

The Cork has more on the exhibition (running to 28 August) of 17 paintings on display that date to the 1800's to include a Cobh-born artist.

Published in Port of Cork

The Atlantic Youth Trust Charity chaired by Round the World sailor Enda O'Coineen, says a 164ft Tradewind schooner it proposes to call 'STV Grace O'Malley' will act as the new ‘flagship’ for introducing young people across the island of Ireland to maritime and careers.

As Afloat reported in October 2021, O’Coineen, a former Director of Coiste an Asgard, says "we have long since championed the need to replace Ireland’s lost sail training vessel the Asgard II in a dynamic and creative new way".

Atlantic Youth Trust supporters travelled to Sweden to try out the new vessel in November and reports on the visit are very favourable for the project that will rely on public and private funding.

The Charity says the tall ship will have a key role to play in the areas of research, innovation, tourism promotion and providing a support outlet for vulnerable young people.

It is hoped the ship can become a floating embassy for Ireland at events home and abroad, ranging from Tall Ships races to trade events while all the time fulfilling her core youth and reconciliation mission.

It is understood that a " mini-refit" will be required to suit Irish purposes. According to O'Coineen, she will need some cosmetic work on deck and will need to be repainted. Much of the running rigging, now several years old, will need replacement.

It is anticipated that the current 35 berths, many of them with specifications ensuite, will need to be increased to 40 or 45 to accommodate 30 trainees, five full professional crew and five experienced youth leaders.

The new ship is a replica of a famous 19th-century wooden ship The Lady Ellen. A successful Swedish industrialist who had seen her as a boy, loved her lines and had a replica rebuilt to the highest specifications in Submarine Steel.

Owned and used over recent years by Tarbet Shipping, based in Skarhamn, she has crossed the Atlantic 17 times and has been maintained, regulated and certified to the highest standard.

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Over 400 young people will participate next year in 29 voyages onboard five ships as part of the Sail Training Ireland 2022 Voyage Calendar launched yesterday in Dublin. Although the charity had to cancel its 2020 and 2021 programmes due to the pandemic, the new calendar further extends its activities that have seen 2,400 young people participating in Tall Ships voyages since the organisation was formed 10 years ago.

The charity is now taking bookings for some new and exciting projects, which are happening alongside its usual annual Irish port voyages. Most of the charity’s voyages have generous bursaries available to reduce the cost to those who may not be able to avail of the opportunity because of their circumstances.

A key aim of the organisation is that the opportunity is open to all abilities. Success in this objective is demonstrated by the fact that 30% of participants in the past two years have had a disability of some kind.

Sail Training Ireland is extremely grateful to all its sponsors and supporters who continued to support the charity through this extremely difficult period.

Sail Training Ireland trainees Sail Training Ireland trainees

Dublin Port Company is delighted to support young people participating in sail training voyages and we look forward to seeing the return of visiting tall ships to Dublin Port in 2022”, said Eamonn O’Reilly, CEO at Dublin Port Company.

Due to pent-up demand arising from the forced lack of activity for the past two years, it is advised that places are booked early to avoid disappointment. Bookings can be made on the Sail Training Ireland website here

“We cannot wait to welcome new trainees on board one of our 2022 sail training voyages. We have been working hard to make up for lost time and to provide as many places available as possible to young people. We hope next year will be the best one ever.

Please come and join us”, commented Daragh Sheridan of Sail Training Ireland at the launch.

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Intended to replace the lost Asgard II, the Atlantic Youth Trust Charity chaired by Round the World sailor Enda O'Coineen, says a 164ft Tradewind schooner it has identified will act as the new ‘flagship’ for introducing young people across the island of Ireland to maritime and careers.

In addition, the Charity says the tall ship will have a key role to play in the areas of research, innovation, tourism promotion and providing a support outlet for vulnerable young people.

O’Coineen, a former Director of Coiste an Asgard, says "we have long since championed the need to replace Ireland’s lost sail training vessel the Asgard II in a dynamic and creative new way".

“This would be a strategically important move for ensuring we are well-positioned to maintain our island’s rich maritime heritage, skill set and knowledge. This will be vital for connecting future generations with the ocean and adventure who might normally never get the opportunity. As we emerge from the Covid 19 pandemic, the urgency for supporting projects like this has never been more important as we seek to address growing mental health challenges facing our young people.”

In looking for a solution to this, the Atlantic Youth Trust have identified, a 164ft Tradewind schooner lying in Sweden which is an ideally suited replacement for delivering youth maritime development and sail training. The ship is to be renamed the Grace O’Malley, after the so-called Mayo ‘Pirate Queen’. Built of steel in a modern structure, and elegant lines of a 19th century Tall Ship, she is considered fit for purpose to high safety specifications.

The Grace O’Malley, is a 164ft Tradewind schooner. The ship is a realistic and modern version of her Edwardian counterpart. She is a replica of a timber merchant schooner originally built in Denmark in 1909.

Built to the same design of Lars-Erik Johansson and constructed in Sweden by Kockcums Submarine Yard, she was launched on 10th August 1980.

In 1986 she sailed to Quebec to take part in the Canadian 450th-anniversary celebrations. Under new ownership, she was re-fitted in 1990 and again in 1993.

The interior was fitted out by the Vindo Yacht Yard and the mast and rig in Skagen, Denmark. She is built with submarine standard steel, teak clad superstructure, teak laid decks and oak capping rails.

This elegant and traditional vessel is fully coded with an E100 Pax Certification for 100-day guests and 37 overnight passengers/trainees and crew. She also features:

  • Powerful topsail schooner rig with 99ft main-mast.
  • Thirteen sails setting 800 sq.m. 550hp Scania diesel engine.
  • 250hp Hundested bow-thruster
  • Two 46kw generators and 29kw generator
  • LOA 50 m / 164 ft long keel sail
  • 9 m / 26 ft steel plate RB35972
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Lerwick has been selected for the third time to be a host port for the spectacular Tall Ships Races.

Sail Training International, the operator of the Tall Ships Races, has today (Tuesday 11 May) announced the selected host ports for the 2023 series, with the Races expected to visit Lerwick, the only Scottish location, from 26-29 July. The isles previously hosted the event in 1999 and 2011.

Shetland Islands Council has led the isles' successful bid, in partnership with Lerwick Port Authority and Shetland Tall Ships Limited, which will undertake delivery of the event locally. Many other organisations are supporting the event, including EventScotland, part of VisitScotland's Events Directorate, and Sail Training Shetland.

Steven Coutts, Leader of Shetland Islands Council: "It is tremendous to get a final confirmation of this news. We have a strong history of delivering memorable Tall Ships Races here in Shetland; they hold a special place in the memories of so many in our community.

"This is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate Shetland's rich maritime heritage and promote Shetland internationally. It will provide a valuable boost to our economy and community as we move into recovery and renewal."

Sandra Laurenson is Interim Chairman of Shetland Tall Ships Limited: "It is very exciting to have the opportunity to bring the spectacular Tall Ships Races back to Lerwick. With just over two years to go, there is plenty to do, and, building on our experience of the two previous visits, we'll now be establishing organising committees, appointing a project manager, fund-raising and developing a programme of events and entertainment for islanders, ships' crews and visitors.

"The event is a great opportunity to rebuild, and we very much look forward to working with the community on the broad appeal of the Tall Ships Races event."

Captain Calum Grains, Port Authority Chief Executive: "The announcement of the Tall Ships' return would be great news at any time, but particularly so during the gradual recovery from the pandemic, and it gives Shetland something exciting and positive to look forward to, and contributes to the promise of better times ahead.

"The colourful visit will provide a major event for the community, a showcase for island products and culture, a boost for the economy and enhance Lerwick's international reputation as a tall ships-friendly port."

Sail Training International Chief Operating Officer Alan James: "We are delighted to announce Lerwick as one of the Host Ports of The Tall Ships Races 2023. We have immense pride in our rich history together and are excited to return to the Shetland Islands for the first time since 2011. With a rich maritime history, shared values of international friendship and understanding, and a strong record staging events, we look forward to Lerwick welcoming the Tall Ships fleet in spectacular style once again."

Paul Bush OBE, VisitScotland's Director of Events: "The confirmation of the return of the Tall Ships Races to Lerwick is great news after they successfully hosted the event in 1999 and 2011, and EventScotland is delighted to be supporting the return of the event in 2023. Hosting major events will be a key part of Scotland's recovery from Covid-19, and Tall Ships will be a significant driver in helping rebuild and support the tourism and events sector in Shetland.  "Scotland is the perfect stage for events, and Lerwick's selection as a host port for the race will provide us with a wonderful opportunity to showcase the region's amazing scenery and culture to an avid audience of sailing enthusiasts."

The ports were announced today (Tuesday) by Tall Ships Races International Ltd, a subsidiary of Sail Training International, which describes the event as 'Europe's largest, free family festival', you can find more information on their announcement here

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The Russian Tall Ship, Sedov, has reported a successful transit the full length of the legendary Northern Sea Route.

After departing from Vladivostok, Russia in mid-August, the Sedov completed the east-west passage passing the southern tip of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago, the easternmost point of Europe. She is expected back in Russia at Murmansk next week.

The ship was originally built in Germany in 1921 and was acquired by the Soviet Union in 1945 as war repatriation.

The journey was made possible due to unprecedented low levels of sea-ice, in some places no ice at all.

The Sedov is a four-masted, steel-hulled barque, almost 100 years old, that is one of the largest of its type in the world. She has visited Ireland a number of times for tall ships events. It is currently operated by Russia's Federal Agency for Fishery. In addition to the ship's usual crew, onboard were 136 cadets from the Baltic State Academy of the Fishing Fleet, the Kaliningrad Maritime Fisheries College and the Murmansk State Technical University.

"We have sailed across practically the whole Northern Sea in open waters and we have not run into any crushed sea-ice, nor icebergs," said Mikhail Novikov, Captain-Supervisor of the Sedov. "We expected that at least."

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Sail Training Ireland has announced the launch of its 2021 Tall Ship voyage calendar (download below) coming after the disappointing decision to have to cancel its 2020 voyages due to COVID-19.

Next year will see some new and exciting projects happening alongside Sail Training Ireland's usual local bursary scheme voyages.

Most of the charity’s voyages have generous bursaries available to reduce the cost to those who may not be in a position to avail of the opportunity because of their circumstances.

Due to pent up demand arising from this year, STI says it is advisable to book early.

“One of the key skills that sail training teaches is resilience. Our trainees, crews, supporters, sponsors, volunteers, vessel operators and the Board and staff have had their spirit tested during 2020 and come through it even stronger. We cannot wait for the 2021 season to start and will be working hard to make it the best one ever". "Please come and join us”, said Daragh Sheridan of Sail Training Ireland at the launch.

2021 Voyage Calendar (download below)

Published in Tall Ships
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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020