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Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises that site investigation works will take place on the Royal Canal towpath east of Phibsborough until next Wednesday 10 March.

These investigate works have been classified as critical infrastructure works so they will continue over the current period of increased COVID-19 restrictions.

The towpath will remain open but Waterways Ireland says users should exercise due care and caution when passing any vehicles or plant machinery along the path.

Published in Inland Waterways

Tomorrow morning, Tuesday 2 March, will see the launch of the Shannon Tourism Masterplan by Heritage Minister Darragh O'Brien and Tourism Minister Catherine Martin as its implementation has already begun.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Shannon Tourism Masterplan sets out a bold and integrated framework for sustainable tourism development along the Shannon and Shannon-Erne Waterway, repositioning the region as a key tourism destination within Ireland’s Hidden Heartlands with world-class visitor experiences based on the region’s natural and cultural assets.

The plan was developed by Waterways Ireland in association with Fáilte Ireland and with the support of the 10 local authorities adjoining the River Shannon and Shannon-Erne Waterway: Leitrim, Cavan, Roscommon, Longford, Westmeath, Galway, Offaly, Tipperary, Clare and Limerick.

Find out more about the objectives and plans for the Shannon and Shannon-Erne inland waterways corridors from 10am on Tuesday 2 March on the Waterways Ireland website HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has appointed Linda Megahey as finance and personnel director to strengthen corporate leadership as the organisation primes itself for an ambitious growth path in the future.

The move has been described as the latest in a series of “strategic appointments” as the cross-border authority for Ireland’s inland waterways prepares to publish its 10-year strategy in the coming months.

Linda has over 25 years’ experience in commercial and financial management working across a number of sectors and latterly in the food and agri sector with Devenish Nutrition and Bawnbua Foods.

She is a professional chartered accountant with membership of ACCA and is currently a board member and treasurer of Aware Northern Ireland.

Commenting on Megahey’s appointment, Waterways Ireland chief executive John McDonagh said: “Linda brings a wealth of corporate and commercial experience to the organisation and she is ideally placed to support our ambitions for growth.

“Over the next 10 years we will pursue a clearly defined strategy which will have many opportunities and a share of challenges. I’m confident that Linda has the skills and expertise required to enable Waterways Ireland to thrive both now and into the future.”

Megahey said: “I’m delighted to be appointed finance and personnel director of Waterways Ireland and look forward to working with my new colleagues and other stakeholders in contributing further to the future success and growth of Waterways Ireland.”

Published in Inland Waterways
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Waterways Ireland advises inland waterways users that essential maintenance works are taking place on the rail bridge over the Grand Canal west of Tullamore until further notice. The maximum safe air draft for passing vessels is 3.2m (10.4ft).

Published in Inland Waterways

The Irish Times reports that Waterways Ireland has confirmed plans to sell off the heritage graving docks at Dublin’s Grand Canal Dock.

The inland waterways authority says it is “currently considering a range of options” regarding the sale of the site, which is one of the last undeveloped land parcels of the Docklands Strategic Development Zone.

Dating from the 1790s, the dry docks have most recently hosted the base of operations for Viking Splash Tours — purchased last month by a Liverpool firm after facing liquidation amid continued pandemic restrictions — as well as the historic former Aran Islands ferry Naomh Éanna.

Four years ago, suggestions that Waterways Ireland had been planning to sell what’s regarded as a key piece of the canal basin’s Georgian architecture prompted a local activist group to appeal to the then Heritage Minister to intervene.

And campaigners have again expressed their dismay, claiming that Waterways Ireland has “reneged on previous assurances” that the docks would be restored for the benefit of the local community.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Port

Waterways Ireland advises that emergency repair works to the lock gates at Tarmonbarry on the Shannon Navigation will take place from Monday 8 March to Wednesday 28 April.

Passage through Tarmonbarry Lock in Co Roscommon will not be possible during this seven-week-plus period as the inland waterway here will be closed.

An alternative route via the Camlin River (subject to Government COVID-19 restrictions) will be available during the works.

Masters of vessels and inland are advised to check their airdraft prior to undertaking the passage on the Camlin River due to the low bridge on the N5 road.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises of essential diving and engineering works on the Shannon Headrace Canal between Ardnacrusha Power Station and Parteen Weir.

The works — which were set to commence yesterday, Monday 15 February — are being carried out on a section of the embankment between Clonlara and Blackwater Bridges until Monday 15 March.

The Headrace Canal will remain open during these works and buoys/markers will be placed in the canal to highlight the works area.

Inland waterways users are asked to maintain due attention when traversing this section of the Shannon and to maintain their distance from the works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland invites expressions of interest to operate a watersport activity business at the Enniskillen Blueway Water Activity Zone in the Co Fermanagh town.

Forms and information packs are available from [email protected] and the closing date for submissions is Friday 26 February at 2pm GMT.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland has appointed John McDonagh as its new chief executive officer following a meeting of the North South Ministerial Council on Wednesday 3 February.

McDonagh will take up a four-year appointment, having previously acted as the interim CEO of Waterways Ireland since April 2019.

Commenting on his appointment and his future vision for the organisation, McDonagh said: “I am pleased to be given the opportunity to lead Waterways Ireland and to continue the journey towards a pathway to growth.

“It is important we keep looking forward and prepare for the future. I envision Waterways Ireland creating inspirational inland navigations through conservation and sustainable development for the benefit of all.

“I am enthusiastic about future developmental opportunities to build upon our natural and built assets to grow the social, economic and environmental well-being value of our navigation waterways in both Northern Ireland and Ireland.”

Waterways Ireland says that since he joined the organisation, McDonagh has concentrated on addressing the key strategic challenges of leadership and organisational capacity gaps; strengthening organisational governance, risk and controls; and focusing on the development of a strategic long-term plan.

He is positioning Waterways Ireland to be a dynamic, purposeful organisation for all users and stakeholders, the organisation says.

Prior to his appointment in Waterways Ireland, John McDonagh spent much of his career in senior roles such as retail director and country manager in Shell Ireland. More recently, he was sales and marketing director with Liberty Insurance where he was responsible for an award-winning brand launch in Ireland. Throughout his long career, he has also consulted across multiple sectors.

McDonagh is an English and History graduate from UCD and he holds a Master’s in Finance. He lives in Sligo and commutes to Waterways Ireland HQ in Enniskillen.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland notifies towpath users that sections of the towpath on the Lough Owel feeder of the Royal Canal from Mullingar Harbour to Fish Farm at Cullion will be closed periodically from today, Monday 8 February, until Friday 19 February for essential maintenance works.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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