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#JOBS – 250 jobs could be created over a three year period across five key maritime areas in Killybegs according to a report launched by the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD,

Minister Coveney set up the group on the 3rd June this year following the Economic Report for the European Commission, which assessed the status, development and potential diversification of Killybegs as a fisheries dependent community. The Group comprising of representatives from the Irish seafood sector, tourism, education, enterprise and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine were tasked to identify potential jobs across key areas including seafood, ancillary services, offshore supports, tourism and marine leisure and green economy/renewable energy.

KILLYBEGS_4

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney with Sean O'Donoghue, Chairman, Chief Executive, Killybegs Fishermen's Organisation Ltd, Cecil Beamish, Assistant Secretary, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Seamus Neely, County Manager, Donegal County Council, Jason Whooley, Chief Executive, Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Paul Hannigan, President, Letterkenny Institute of Education, Jim Parkinson, Representing Offshore and Ancillary Services, Niall O'Gorman, Representing Donegal Fish Merchants Association and Conor Fahy, Regional Director, Enterprise Ireland at the launch of a report on Job Creation in the Killybegs Region.

Minister Coveney commented at the launch; "I set ambitious targets for the group and I am very pleased to see that the group has not only clearly outlined how 250 jobs can be achieved but has also identified new areas where additional jobs can be created into the future. The importance of the seafood sector to Killybegs region cannot be overstated as it is responsible for 68% of the workforce. The Group has identified that through greater diversification and adding value to our existing resources, 130 jobs will be delivered in this sector. The Group are to be commended for working together to complete this task in the allocated time and I am looking forward to seeing the actions from the report completed and the benefits that they will bring to the people of Killybegs".

The report outlines 250 jobs to be created over a three year period across five key areas. In total, 130 potential jobs were identified within the seafood sector. The expected increased access to raw materials such as blue whiting and boarfish present the most significant opportunities, along with a concerted focus on value adding opportunities. Within the ancillary services, 24 jobs were identified if collaborative opportunities between various companies can be enhanced and their abilities promoted. The offshore sector could generate 20 jobs, however competitive service provision and appropriate skill resources are deemed fundamental to achieve this. Approaching 50 jobs were identified within the tourism/marine leisure area if a co-ordinated marketing strategy is developed, whilst the green economy and renewable energy area offers the potential to create up to 40 jobs.

The Minister added "This pilot approach of co-ordinated developmentally focused activity which is concentrated on natural resources has delivered results that will drive economic development and job creation in the Killybegs region. An example of this is the partnership between BIM and LYIT to address seafood value added activities. As a direct result of this jobs initiative, the College of Catering in Killybegs will become a focus for industry activity beginning with a workshop on new product development for crab suppliers is already planned for the 30th November".

Members of the High Level Group are:
Sean O'Donoghue, Chairman, Chief Executive, Killybegs Fishermen's Organisation Ltd
Cecil Beamish, Assistant Secretary, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine
Seamus Neely, County Manager, Donegal County Council
Jason Whooley, Chief Executive, Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM)
Paul Hannigan, President, Letterkenny Institute of Education
Jim Parkinson, Representing Offshore and Ancillary Services
Niall O'Gorman, Representing Donegal Fish Merchants Association
Conor Fahy, Regional Director, Enterprise Ireland

Published in Aquatic Tourism
#AQUATIC TOURISM - Scotland looks to Ireland for inspiration in growing its sailing tourism industry, a new report shows.
Tourism Intelligence Scotland's comprehensive Sailing Tourism in Scotland guide outlines opportunities for businesses already involved in sailing, as well as those willing to dip a toe into an area with much potential for growth.
Among various case studies, the guide points to the Sail West initiative headed by Donegal County Council, which aims to link the coastlines of Northern Ireland, north west Ireland and Scotland and develop the tourism infrastructure between the regions.
It also notes the initiative's MalinWaters brand, which aims to support tourism businesses with information on the latest products and services, and provide opportunities to share knowledge and best practices.
The Sailing Tourism in Scotland guide is available as a PDF to read or download HERE.

#AQUATIC TOURISM - Scotland looks to Ireland for inspiration in growing its sailing tourism industry, a new report shows.

Tourism Intelligence Scotland's comprehensive Sailing Tourism in Scotland guide outlines opportunities for businesses already involved in sailing, as well as those willing to dip a toe into an area with much potential for growth.

Among various case studies, the guide points to the Sail West initiative headed by Donegal County Council, which aims to link the coastlines of Northern Ireland, north west Ireland and Scotland and develop the tourism infrastructure between the regions. 

It also notes the initiative's MalinWaters brand, which aims to support tourism businesses with information on the latest products and services, and provide opportunities to share knowledge and best practices.

The Sailing Tourism in Scotland guide is available as a PDF to read or download HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
#AQUATIC TOURISM - Water-based activities from kayaking to surfing to diving have a "huge potential" for Irish tourism.
That was the message from Fáilte Ireland's Outdoor Adventure and Activity Forum in Westport, Co Mayo this week, The Irish Times reports.
Figures announced at the forum showed that angling tourism accounted for €58 million, while surfing attracted 52,000 visitors - a low number considering Ireland's growing reputation in the sport.
Fáilte Ireland's Brian Maher said that the agency is working on a new strategy for aquatic tourism to take advantage of Ireland's potential in the area, aiming to develop activities from angling to cruising and sailing to surfing.
“One of Ireland’s great strengths has been in angling," he said. "There is still tremendous potential there for that core group of anglers.
"It is incumbent on us to develop this and other water-based activities properly because there is so much potential there.”

#AQUATIC TOURISM - Water-based activities from kayaking to surfing to diving have a "huge potential" for Irish tourism.

That was the message from Fáilte Ireland's Outdoor Adventure and Activity Forum in Westport, Co Mayo this week, The Irish Times reports.

Figures announced at the forum showed that angling tourism accounted for €58 million in revenue, while surfing attracted 52,000 visitors - a low number considering Ireland's growing reputation in the sport.

Fáilte Ireland's Brian Maher said that the agency is working on a new strategy for aquatic tourism to take advantage of Ireland's potential in the area, aiming to develop activities from angling to cruising and sailing to surfing.

“One of Ireland’s great strengths has been in angling," he said. "There is still tremendous potential there for that core group of anglers. 

"It is incumbent on us to develop this and other water-based activities properly because there is so much potential there.”

Published in Aquatic Tourism

A former Irish Sailing Chief has added his voice to the growing concerns of sailors in Dun Laoghaire to a recently published Harbour Masterplan that Waterfront Yacht Clubs say threatens sailing in the port, Ireland's biggest sailing centre.

The plans, along with the loss of the winter ferry service from the port were featured on RTE News this week.

The Harbour company, who published the designs last month, say the masterplan can create 'a thousand jobs' but a former Irish Sailing Association (ISA) President, Roger Bannon has blasted both the plan and a supporting promotional video (below) as 'grandiose nonsense'.

"The Masterplan will position Dun Laoghaire Harbour as a marine, leisure and tourism destination of international calibre", says Gerry Dunne, Chief Executive Officer, Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company.

"We need to spend an average of €5m a year on maintaining and developing the Harbour infrastructure. The Masterplan will involve investment of more than €230m, over the next 10-15 years and will result in 1000 sustainable jobs in areas such as tourism, marine service companies, select retail, and food and beverage." says the CEO.

But Bannon, a Dun Laoghaire sailing champion, says a plan is needed but the focus instead should be on something a lot more realistic.

"Sure we want a development plan for Dun laoghaire and its Harbour but let's look at something realistic and practical over a 10 year period which we know will work and stay away from this impossible grandiose nonsense.

Mr Leo Varadkar, T.D., Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport visited the Harbour Board in June to view the Masterplan model and the plans.

During the visit the Minister said he was aware of the very keen local interest in the future development of the harbour. The yacht clubs, who occupy 50% of the harbour waterfront, say the future of the harbour is in marine lesiure.

Bannon's full comments are below:

"What a load of aspirational twaddle. High on sweeping statements and low on specifics. Sounds more like a plan to occupy people in highly paid jobs while nothing will ever happen.

Sure we want a development plan for Dun laoghaire and its Harbour but let's look at something realistic and practical over a 10 year period which we know will work and stay away from this impossible grandiose nonsense.

There are plenty of examples of cost effective developments in many cities around the world, such as Vancouver and Boston, where marine facilities and other resources similar to Dun laogahire have been brilliantly exploited for the general benefit of everyone.

Heaven forbid that our public servants might learn something from others facing the same dilemma elsewhere in the world. Should someone tell the Harbour Board that counting on residential development to generate funding may not work?

Finally, I do not understand how the Harbour Board can take it upon itself to come up with such a plan without integration with local planning for the whole of Dun Laoghaire. Was the video made by DreamWorks?"

Published in Dublin Bay
World tourism bosses and cruise line operators will be headed to Galway next month for high-powered talks aimed at transforming the city into a global destination port.
The Connacht Sentinel reports that execuives from Fáilte Ireland, the Galway Harbour Company and Galway Chamber of Commerce will meet a delegation that will include Jamaica's head of tourism and some of the world's largest cruise line operators.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the proposed €200 million redevelopment of Galway Harbour - which will increase berthing space to accommodate cruise ships - has received approval to submit a planning application to An Bord Pleanála.
Galway West Deputy Brian Walsh, who helped push forward the development plan and will also meet the delegation at the end of September, said that the Galway Harbour Company has set a target of 50 cruise ships a year - which could bring in an extra €40 million annually to the local economy.
The Connacht Sentinel has more on the story HERE.

World tourism bosses and cruise line operators will be headed to Galway next month for high-powered talks aimed at transforming the city into a global destination port.

The Connacht Sentinel reports that execuives from Fáilte Ireland, the Galway Harbour Company and Galway Chamber of Commerce will meet a delegation that will include Jamaica's head of tourism and some of the world's largest cruise line operators to discuss attracting business to the redeveloped port.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the proposed €200 million redevelopment of Galway Harbour - which will increase berthing space to accommodate cruise ships - has received approval to submit a planning application to An Bord Pleanála.

Galway West Deputy Brian Walsh, who helped push forward the development plan and will also meet the delegation at the end of September, said that the Galway Harbour Company has set a target of 50 cruise ships a year - which could bring in an extra €40 million annually to the local economy.

The Connacht Sentinel has more on the story HERE.

Published in Galway Harbour
A rare blue lobster has become and unlikely tourist attraction in Co Clare, the Irish Times reports.
The lobster - its blue hue believed to be caused by a genetic trait similar to albinism in humans - avoided the cooking pot and now takes pride of place at Martina Sweeney's seafood shop in New Quay.
Her fisherman husband Gerry, who caught the crustacean, said: "I’ve been fishing for 30 years and have never seen anything like this."
It's believed that only one in three million lobsters is blue. Due to their bright colouring they are often prey for other sea creatures.

A rare blue lobster has become and unlikely tourist attraction in Co Clare, The Irish Times reports.

The lobster - its blue hue believed to be caused by a genetic trait similar to albinism in humans - avoided the cooking pot and now takes pride of place at Martina Sweeney's seafood shop in New Quay.

Her fisherman husband Gerry, who caught the crustacean, said: "I’ve been fishing for 30 years and have never seen anything like this."

It's believed that only one in three million lobsters is blue. Due to their bright colouring they are often prey for other sea creatures.

Published in Marine Wildlife

After a quarter of a century, Glenans Irish Sailing Club has been reunited with its French parent association, writes Bryan Dobson.

Well known to generations of Irish dinghy and keel boat sailors, the Glénans sail training bases at Baltimore, Co Cork, and Collanmore Island in Clew Bay, Co Mayo, are reopening this season under new French/Irish management. The merger of Glenans Irish Sailing Club (GISC) with Les Glénans of France, prompted by financial difficulties in the Irish club, was approved by the two organisations last November, securing the future of the Irish bases which now becomes Les Glénans newest secteur.

The Irish operation, founded by the French in the 1960s but independent since the 1980s, will form part of an association which trains some 14,000 people each year, making it Europe's largest sail training organisation.

glenans_beneteau

"It enables GISC to become part of a financially sound organisation with the same ethos," said Emma Sweeney, who was recently elected President of the Irish secteur committee. She and the 11 other committee members will assist in the running of the Irish bases, working with the French-appointed chef de base, Tom Daune.

Daune, who was an assistant chef de base for Les Glénans at île d'Arz in the Morbihan in Brittany since 2006, says they will "continue to refresh the fleets and buildings on the two bases" and "develop more cruising activity in Baltimore", as well as looking at the introduction of windsurfing in Collanmore.

Les Glénans has already demonstrated its commitment to the Irish secteur with new boats and equipment in place for the coming sailing season. The base at Collanmore in Clew Bay has taken delivery of 18 new catamarans. In Baltimore, the fleet of specially-designed Les Glénans 570 keel boats has been overhauled and added to, with each named after one of the seven deadly sins! The Glénans moorings at Baltimore have also been extended to accommodate two newly-delivered Sunfast 32s, which will be available for sailing courses in the magnificent cruising grounds of West Cork along with club's Sunfast 37 Sherkin ll.

Tom Daune says they "hope to have some strong links between Irish and French members....to permit them to sail together and to build a common knowledge. The courses are all bilingual. The main language is English, and French will be present too. So we have to develop our franglais."

"They're just mesmerised by the Irish coast," said Emma Sweeney of the French sailors from Les Glénans that she has met. She believes the merger will result in "significantly larger numbers of people coming to Ireland to sail in Baltimore and Collanmore".

And for the first time, Ireland will have a voice at the top table in Les Glénans with the election of Sinead MacAleese to the governing board of the organisation, the Conseil d'Administration. At the association's recent AGM, she topped the poll, out of 13 candidates, to secure one of only four vacancies on the Conseil.

A member of GISC for the last ten year and now based in Prague in the Czech Republic, Sinead has lived and worked in France for the last 12 years. She was one of the team that helped negotiate the merger of the two organisations, a development which she describes as "a great opportunity for the club to grow on two fronts".

Firstly, she believes there is an opportunity to deepen the ethos of Les Glénans, which is based on sailing without borders, on friendship and on volunteerism. "Volunteering is very important, a real core value," she said. And then there is the international dimension to the merger. "This is an opportunity for France to grow internationally." Les Glénans has a number of bases in Italy but Ireland is its first fully non-French secteur. And it means Les Glénans can offer Englis-speaking sailing courses to French and other non-Irish trainees in Ireland.

"They are very keen on developing English speaking courses," said Paul Rossiter, who was chairman of GISC in the run-up to the merger. A key member of the Irish negotiating team, he says the French association wanted to "spread their wings" as well as "insure that Glénans activities continued in Ireland".

Tom Daune believes it will be "very exciting for French, Belgian, Italian or Spanish members to sail in Ireland with Les Glénans. It's a new sailing area with an amazing landscape...and it's a fabulous place to learn more."

Les Glénans will be running courses at Baltimore and Collanmore from April through to October, for both adults and teenagers.

And according to Tom Daune, they can expect a unique experience: "Glénans arises from the dream of a more brotherly society and from a passion for the sea...Glénans is a sailing school, a sea school and a school of life."

For Les Glénans bookings see www.glenans.ie or phone 0033 153938600 (dial 1 and 1)

Published in Aquatic Tourism
Dun Laoghaire's future lies in tourism and leisure, according to a submission on the new 'master plan' for the busy harbour.
The Irish Times reports that the town's top sailing and yacht clubs, who have come together under the banner of Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs, are putting aside their individual interests "in favour of a larger and longer-term vision for the harbour".
The clubs' submission urges a rethink on public access to both the shore and water sides of the harbour. Inprovements in linking the town with the harbour area are already a goal of the master plan.
"Properly developed with a marine tourism and leisure focus [Dun Laoghaire] can generate new and sustainable sources of income." they said.
Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs comprises the 'big four' waterfront clubs - the National, Royal Irish, Royal St George and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club - as well as the Dublin Bay Sailing Club and the Royal Alfred Yacht Club.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Dun Laoghaire's future lies in tourism and leisure, according to a submission on the new 'master plan' for the busy harbour.

The Irish Times reports that the town's top sailing and yacht clubs, who have come together under the banner of Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs, are putting aside their individual interests "in favour of a larger and longer-term vision for the harbour".

The clubs' submission urges a rethink on public access to both the shore and water sides of the harbour. Inprovements in linking the town with the harbour area are already a goal of the master plan.

"Properly developed with a marine tourism and leisure focus [Dun Laoghaire] can generate new and sustainable sources of income." they said.

Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs comprises the 'big four' waterfront clubs - the National, Royal Irish, Royal St George and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club - as well as the Dublin Bay Sailing Club and the Royal Alfred Yacht Club.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Dublin Bay
Seaweed picking is just one example of many 'green' tourist breaks now available in Ireland, according to The Irish Times.
Inchydoney Island Lodge and Spa in West Cork offers a two-night 'seaweed experience' for those looking for a more responsible, activity-based weekend away.
Aside from the typical spa treatments such as seaweed baths, local experts will take visitors seaweed foraging by kayak, while also educating about the area's natural beauty and abundant marine life.
Seaweed was once a staple of the Irish diet, and this break aims at a revival of the versatile superfood by showing how it can be used in a variety of dishes.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Seaweed picking is just one example of many 'green' tourism breaks now available in Ireland, according to The Irish Times.

Inchydoney Island Lodge and Spa in West Cork offers a two-night 'seaweed experience' for those looking for a more responsible, activity-based weekend away.

Aside from the typical spa treatments such as seaweed baths, local experts will take visitors seaweed foraging by kayak, while also educating about the area's natural beauty and abundant marine life.

Seaweed was once a staple of the Irish diet, and this break aims at a revival of the versatile superfood by showing how it can be used in a variety of dishes.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
Top British architects have won the commission to develop an ambitious master plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour.
The Dun Laoghaire Gazette reports that Metropolitan Workshop have been tasked examining the feasibility of redeveloping the port to attract cruise liners carrying 100,000 passengers annually.
The plan, to be completed by the summer, is aimed at realising Dun Laoghaire's potential "as a major marine, leisure and tourism destination".
Improved public spaces linking the town and the harbour, tourism opportunities and new cultural attractions are just some of the proposals that the plan will take into consideration.
Jonny McKenna of Metropolitan Workshop old the Gazette: "Our approach is anchored in Dun Laoghaire's history and heritage. Our aim is to broaden the appeal of the harbour, both locally and internationally, as a world-class waterfront destination."
The consultation and drafting phase of the master plan will be completed by the end of this month.

Top British architects have won the commission to develop an ambitious master plan for Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The Dun Laoghaire Gazette reports that Metropolitan Workshop have been tasked examining the feasibility of redeveloping the port to attract cruise liners carrying 100,000 passengers annually.

The plan, to be completed by the summer, is aimed at realising Dun Laoghaire's potential "as a major marine, leisure and tourism destination".

Improved public spaces linking the town and the harbour, tourism opportunities and new cultural attractions are just some of the proposals that the plan will take into consideration.

Jonny McKenna of Metropolitan Workshop old the Gazette: "Our approach is anchored in Dun Laoghaire's history and heritage. Our aim is to broaden the appeal of the harbour, both locally and internationally, as a world-class waterfront destination."

The consultation and drafting phase of the master plan will be completed by the end of this month.

Published in Dublin Bay
Page 14 of 16

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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