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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

#Lifeboats - Volunteers from Clifden RNLI had a pre-Christmas callout to go to the aid of a bull who fell from a steep cliff near the western Connemara town on Saturday evening (22 December).

At 5pm, Clifden RNLI’s deputy launching authority Saul Joyce requested the station’s Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat to launch to assist a local farmer whose bull had slipped down a cliff and become stuck on the shoreline below.

The area was inaccessible by road and difficult to access on foot. The farmer, three members of the public and the local vet were on scene.

Helmed by Alan Pryce and with crew members Thomas Davis, Daniel Whelan and Ian Shanahan onboard, the lifeboat was launched immediately and attended the scene around half a mile from the station.

Weather conditions at the time were favourable with a light westerly Force 1-2 breeze. The sea was flat and calm at high tide.

Crew member Davis was put ashore to assist the farmer and vet, and a plan was put in place whereby a bridle or halter was attached to the animal and passed to the lifeboat.

Under the instruction of the vet and farmer, the lifeboat gently made way astern and used the tension on the line to guide the animal off the dangerous rocks into the water.

The lifeboat crew then guided the bull as it swam to a nearby beach, where it made its way up the shore to safety.

The lifeboat stood by until all parties were safely away from the cliffs and water and then returned to base.

Speaking following the rescue, Clifden RNLI Helm Alan Pryce said: “We were happy to assist the local farmer and vet to help the bull out of the hazardous position it was in.

“We are very aware of the dangers posed by large animals that are distressed and were glad to be able to assist the farmer while also providing a safety presence to him and the individuals working with him to bring the bull to safety, on what was a dangerous and dark shore.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s annual Christmas Eve ceremony to remember the 15 volunteer lifeboat crew who died on service in Dublin Bay on 24 December 1895 will take place at noon this coming Monday.

The short ceremony at the end of the East Pier, beside the lighthouse, will include music, readings, an ecumenical blessing and wreath-laying.

Please allow time to walk the pier to arrive for the midday start.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI, in the run-up to the Christmas period, are reminding the public to look after their personal safety when engaged in any water or coastal based activities.

They have issued a joint safety message reminding the public to heed simple safety advice when they are out on the water or engaged in any activity along the water’s edge. The two organisations have cautioned that many accidents and tragedies take place involving people who never expected to end up in the water.

There are some key pieces of advice that the RNLI and the Irish Coast Guard ask people to keep in mind when they are around the water over the Christmas and New Year break: 

Stay Back – Stay High – Stay Dry when engaged in coastal walks and avoid any unfamiliar routes and be mindful of changes caused by coastal erosion and the risk of trip, slips and falls.

Ensure that pets are kept under control in case they get into difficulty and cause owners to risk their own safety in rescuing them.

Remember to carry a suitable means to call for help such as mobile phone, vhf radio or Personal Locator beacon

If engaged in any boating activities Do Wear an appropriate personal flotation device – it could save a life.

If going out alone, tell someone ashore your plans and what time you expect to be back.

For anybody engaged in a Christmas or New Year swim only participate in an organised swim that has appropriate safety facilities

Always remember if you see anybody in trouble on the water or along the coast or if you think they are in trouble Ring 112 and ask for the Coast Guard. 

The RNLI’s ‘Float to Live’ message advises people who fall into cold water unexpectedly to fight their instinct to swim until the cold-water shock passes.

They should pause, and float on their back until able to catch their breath and either call for help or swim to land if it is nearby. The Coast Guard is reiterating its message to Stay afloat – Stay in Contact, meaning that if they can stay afloat and raise the alarm then they have an excellent chance of being rescued.

Irish Coast Guard Operations Manager Gerard O’Flynn said, ‘at this time of year people love to get out and about. Do so safely and act sensibly and wisely and if in doubt shout. Coast Guard services, will be fully operational over the holiday period.”

RNLI Lifesaving Manager Sean Dillon said, ‘It is much easier than people realise to get into trouble in the water. Whatever activity you are doing, make sure you are aware of the dangers, know your limits and do not take risks. Over the previous ten years, from Christmas Eve to New Year’s Day, RNLI lifeboats launched 137 times and assisted 57 people in Ireland. While all the search and rescue services stand ready to help people, being prepared and taking some basic safety advice can avoid an accident or a serious tragedy.’

In conclusion, both Sean and Gerard, wish all RNLI and Coast Guard volunteers, their shore-based support teams and staff, a happy and safe Christmas. Volunteer lifeboat and coast guard crews remain on call over the Christmas period.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#WaterSafety - For many in Ireland a festive dip in the sea is part of a Christmas tradition.

But the RNLI reminds anyone planning for a seaside swim next week that the sea is at its coldest, and potentially most deadly.

If you run straight into cold water, you are more likely to suffer from cold water shock. The best way to avoid this is to wear a wetsuit.

If this isn’t possible, walk into the sea slowly and stay shallow. This will allow your body time to acclimatise gradually.

Cold water shock is a physiological response which causes uncontrollable gasping. This increases the risk of you swallowing water and puts a strain on your heart — in extreme cases it can cause cardiac arrest.

If you feel you this happening to you, fight your instinct to thrash around and swim hard, instead just lie back and float.

The initial shock will pass within 60–90 seconds, and when you have regained control of your breathing, you can then try swimming to safety or calling for help.

This skill will give you a far better chance of staying alive.

If you see someone else in trouble in the water, fight the instinct to go in yourself. Call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

The RNLI’s drowning prevention campaign, Respect the Water, aims to raise awareness of key hazards like cold water shock, and lifesaving skills like floating.

Find out more about how to float and about cold water shock by visiting RespectTheWater.com.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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This Saturday morning (22 December) 100 Scuba divers dressed in Santa suits will brave the elements and dive into the sea water off Sandycove Beach to raise money for the RNLI.

The annual Santa Scuba Dive has raised over €8,000 since 2014 when it was started by Karen Kenny of the Dublin University Sub-Aqua Club.

The unique Christmas event begins at 11am this Saturday 22 December at Sandycove Beach in Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin — and spectators will also see the local D-class lifeboat, Howth Coast Guard RIB and a flyby from the Dublin-based coastguard helicopter, weather and operations permitting.

For more see the event page on Facebook and the fundraising page on JustGiving.

Published in Diving

Volunteers from Ballyglass RNLI spent 11 and half hours at sea today to bring three fishermen to safety off the Donegal coast.

The lifeboat crew were requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat at 4 am yesterday morning  following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go to the aid of three fishermen onboard a 10m vessel that had got into difficulty 38 miles from Ballyglass. 

The lifeboat under Coxswain James Mangan and with four crew members onboard launched immediately into the darkness and made its way to the scene and into Donegal Bay.

The fishing boat had got into difficulty when it fouled its propeller.

Weather conditions at the time were good and when the lifeboat crew arrived on scene they assessed that all on board were safe and well before working with the fishermen to establish a towline and then begin the slow journey to Killybegs where they arrived at 10.30am.

Following a short break for breakfast, the lifeboat crew then began the return journey back to Ballyglass, arriving at the lifeboat station and preparing the lifeboat for service again at 3.30pm.

Speaking following the call out, Padraic Sheeran, Ballyglass RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘The fishermen did the right thing this morning raising the alarm when they got into trouble and we were delighted to be able to help them return to shore safely.

‘This was an early morning call out for our volunteers who got out of their beds to respond to their pagers and make their way to the scene. Given where the boat had got into difficulty into Donegal Bay, by the time we reached the scene and towed the vessel safely into Killybegs and made the passage back, our crew had spent 11 and a half hours at sea. This is what they are trained for and prepared to do but their efforts today are commendable, and I would like to thank our volunteer team for their willingness, time and dedication.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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All In A Row 2018 comes to the River Liffey this Saturday 1 December, challenging teams rowing 40 skiffs, kayaks, canoes and currachs to exceed a 1,000km target in eight hours.

The organisers are hoping to beat last year’s target during the event from St Patrick’s Rowing Club at the Tom Clarke Bridge (formerly the East-Link Bridge) and finishing at the Ha’penny Bridge.

While showcasing the River Liffey as one of Dublin’s best amenities, the challenge also aims to raise funds for water-related charities, namely the RNLI and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit.

The event will start at 8am this Saturday and at noon all boats will gather in front of the Sean O’Casey footbridge. A wreath-laying ceremony, attended by the Lord Mayor of Dublin Nial Ring, will also take place to commemorate all those who have lost their lives through drowning.

The event remembers particularly the crew of the currach rowed and sailed from the Liffey to Santiago de Compostela and who later lost a valued crew member in Danny Sheehy.

The RNLI will have an Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat on display for people to view during the day, berthed alongside the Jeanie Johnston replica famine ship.

The event is also being used as an opportunity to engage with inner city Dublin schools whose pupils have been invited to the Dublin Docklands offices to learn about water safety through the RNLI’s Respect the Water campaign, and how they can volunteer in their communities to help save lives at sea. The city’s Sea Scouts will also be participating in the event.

Many Dublin rowing clubs have their home on the River Liffey and are a regular sight on the water. At the port end of the river is St Patrick’s Rowing Club, Stella Maris Rowing Club, East Wall Water Sports Group and Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club.

Ringsend Basin is home to the Plurabelle Paddlers (Dragon boats) and the Dublin Viking Dragon boat club. At the other end of the city, beyond Heuston Station, there are many river rowing clubs and kayaking clubs, including Phoenix Rowing Club.

This Saturday the many boating clubs of the Liffey will be joined by rowing clubs from other parts of Ireland.

“Everyone knows the River Liffey but most people don’t know how far it stretches and how many rowing groups use it regularly,” organisers said.

“There is a vibrant boating community on the River Liffey and these clubs regard it as the living artery of the city and one of Dublin’s great and undervalued amenities.

“After the beautiful summer we’ve had, we know that people are drawn to the water, whether on the coast or inland to enjoy different water sports.

“The Liffey is an undervalued and underused resource that is right under people’s noses and we want to encourage them to use it and to use it safely. From school children right up to seasoned rowers, this is a great opportunity to draw people down to the Liffey and learn about water safety and the fun activities they can do on the water all year round.”

Competitors are asked to raise sponsorship for the event, and for those not competing and supporters, there is a GoFundMe page for donations.

Published in Rowing

Volunteers from Lough Ree RNLI launched during Storm Diana to assist one person near St Johns Wood.

At 10.35 this morning (Wednesday, 28 November 2018), Lough Ree RNLI volunteers were contacted by a gentleman who had sought refuge the previous evening, due to failing light at the floating jetty, off the shore of St John’s Wood on the Roscommon side of Lough Ree. Due to worsening conditions overnight and this morning he requested our assistance. Our Inshore Lifeboat, The Eric Rowse was launched at 10.48 and the crew made their way to the scene. Conditions on the lake were extremely rough with Storm Diana in full strength. Winds were storm force 8 from the south with 2m waves, making for a very bumpy trip up the lake.

Upon arrival on scene, the crew found the casualty to be uninjured, wearing his lifejacket and wet weather clothing and in good form. Having ensured the casualty vessel was well secured, the gentleman was brought onto The Eric Rowse and brought back to the Station in Coosan Point.

Speaking after the call out volunteer Lifeboat Helm, Tom Bradbury said; ‘Conditions can change on the lake very quickly, especially at this time of year. This gentleman did exactly as we advise, when light started failing last night he sought a suitable mooring for the night and when he awoke to worsening conditions this morning he requested assistance. We would always advise people using the lake to check the weather forecast before heading out on the water and to always wear a lifejacket’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A man who fell overboard from his vessel near Cork Harbour was lucky to escape relatively unscathed after his lifejacket failed to inflate.

Crosshaven’s volunteer RNLI crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat at 5.20pm yesterday evening (Tuesday 27 November) to reports of a person shouting for help at Drakes Pool, a mile upriver from the lifeboat station.

On arrival, it was found the casualty had managed to remove himself from the water and onto another moored vessel after being in the water for up to 30 minutes, and was extremely cold and hypothermic.

The casualty was immediately evacuated to the lifeboat station where he was assessed by Dr John Murphy, Crosshaven RNLI’s doctor, and put into a hot shower before being taken by ambulance to Cork University Hospital for further evaluation.

Speaking following the the callout, Phil Maguire, Crosshaven RNLI Deputy Lifeboat Press Officer said: “We wish the casualty well following what must have been a frightening experience.”

The casualty was wearing a lifejacket, but this failed to inflate — highlighting the importance of getting your safety equipment checked and kept in good order.

Published in Cork Harbour

One of the Kinsale RNLI volunteers honoured for their role in the rescue of 30 crew from the tall ship Astrid in July 2013 has been jailed for seven years on drug distrubution charges.

As The Irish Times reports, Liam O’Connell was sentenced to 10 years with three suspended after pleading guilty to possession of cannabis, cocaine and MDMA for sale or supply at his home just over a year ago.

At sentencing, the judge said O’Connell has exploited his status in the Kinsale community as an RNLI volunteer to participate in the drugs trade.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 8 of 173

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