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Displaying items by tag: Water Safety Ireland

Water Safety Ireland is seeking the views of the public on a draft regulatory framework for aquatic leisure facilities in Ireland.

Following the inquest on 29 March 2017 into the tragic fatal drowning of Ronan Kennedy at the Red Barn Quality Hotel in Youghal on 14 July 2015, the Dublin Coroner made two crucial recommendations to former Minister for Housing, Planning, Community & Local Government, Simon Coveney:

  • That there should be a dedicated lifeguard on duty at all times at swimming pools and that the lifeguard should not be a person engaged in other supervisory duties; and
  • To recommend to the relevant minister that a dedicated water safety inspectorate is required to formulate regulations and ensure their implementation.

Minister Coveney tasked Water Safety Ireland to review best practice in other European countries with a view to informing the development of an appropriate regulatory framework for Ireland.

Water Safety Ireland says it believes this can be a legacy that will turn this tragic drowning in to a positive regulatory framework that will help prevent similar tragedies in the future, to be known as ‘Ronan’s Regulations’.

Details of the public consultation are available on the Water Safety Ireland website HERE.

Published in Water Safety

Water Safety Ireland (formerly Irish Water Safety) is appealing for people to swim at lifeguarded waterways this weekend where possible, as the risk of drownings is higher due to a new moon and cool waters.

The new moon will cause strong rip currents that can quickly take a person away from shore.

Survival time in such scenarios is also greatly reduced due to the cooler water temperatures that have not yet warmed up sufficiently for extended swims.

Lifeguards are trained to spot these currents and keep people away from danger.

The lifeguard season begins this weekend and there are many reasons to swim under their supervision.

Lifeguards administered first aid over 4,000 times last year. They located 300 lost children and rescued more than 300 people nationwide.

Stranding will also be a risk for many walkers as lower tides will expose even greater areas of the coastline. Walkers should always carry a mobile phone to call 112 in an emergency.

Parents should provide constant uninterrupted supervision as 30 children aged 14 and under drowned in the 10 years to 2018.

Those going afloat should always wear a lifejacket and carry a portable marine VHF and/or a personal locator beacon.

If you have not used your lifejacket or buoyancy aid since last year, then you will need to carry out the following checks:

  • Ensure CO2 cartridges have not been punctured and are firmly secured.
  • Ensure all zips, buckles, fasteners and webbing straps are functioning correctly.
  • Check that fitted lights are operating correctly.
  • Check that the valve or lifejacket is not leaking by inflating the lifejacket overnight or immersing it in water checking for air bubbles.
  • Always use your crotch strap when fitting your lifejacket.
  • Discard any faulty lifejackets by destroying them.

Detailed information on lifejackets and personal flotation devices (PFDs) is available on the Water Safety Ireland website.

Published in Water Safety
Tagged under
Ballybunion's Sea and Cliff Rescue Service celebrated its 25th anniversary with an open day at its headquarters last weekend, The Kerryman reports.
The day also saw the unveiling of a special plaque from Water Safety Ireland recognising the rescuers' service to the locality.
The volunteer rescue unit was founded in 1986 by just three men: Mike Flahive, Frank O'Connor and TJ McCarron.
"It's the support of the public that's our bottom line and we're delighted with the continuing generosity of the people of North Kerry and West Limerick," said John Walsh, a member of the unit for 24 years. "Without it we simply wouldn't be here today."
The Kerryman has more on the story HERE.

Ballybunion's Sea and Cliff Rescue Service celebrated its 25th anniversary with an open day at its headquarters last weekend, The Kerryman reports.

The day also saw the unveiling of a special plaque from Water Safety Ireland recognising the rescuers' service to the locality.

The volunteer rescue unit was founded in 1986 by just three men: Mike Flahive, Frank O'Connor and TJ McCarron.

"It's the support of the public that's our bottom line and we're delighted with the continuing generosity of the people of North Kerry and West Limerick," said John Walsh, a member of the unit for 24 years.

"Without it we simply wouldn't be here today."

The Kerryman has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue
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