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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

Three RNLI Lifeboat’s from Bangor, Donaghadee and Larne were today involved with a multi-agency search with two Coastguard helicopters, Lagan Search and Rescue, PSNI Boat and local Coastguard Rescue Teams.

After reports of a paddleboarder overdue at Helen’s Bay, Belfast Coastguard requested the volunteer crew members from Bangor inshore lifeboat to launch at 3.43 pm followed by the two all-weather lifeboats from Donaghadee and Larne at 4.24pm.

The three lifeboats liaised with Belfast Coastguard and the other rescue agencies to form search patterns in order to locate the missing paddleboarder.

The visibility was good albeit light was being lost, conditions were challenging out at sea with a west to north-west wind force 6 – 8 at times.

Search teams were stood down just before 6 pm when clarification was received that the suspected casualty was safe and well.

Margaret Ramm, Donaghadee Lifeboat Press Officer commented ‘ We were relieved to hear that this was a false alarm with good intent, that the paddleboarder had been located and was not in any danger. Conditions today were challenging enough and if there had been a person in the water time really was of the essence in order to prevent loss of life, always contact the emergency services as early as possible if you are worried. As always we recommend checking sea conditions and wind direction before going into the sea and carrying a means of contacting shore, and always be aware of your own capabilities.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A fundraising volunteer for Lough Derg RNLI has received an award for her services to the Co Tipperary lifeboat station.

Laura Clarke was presented with the Excellence in Volunteering Award by RNLI community manager Jennifer Grey during the annual Christmas card and gift sale at Lough Derg Yacht Club in Dromineer yesterday (Tuesday 9 November).

Laura has been a volunteer on the Lough Derg RNLI Fundraising Committee for 11 years. She says she became a volunteer because the charity “was one my late father loved and always supported, and it was something I wished to continue”.

She recalled that her father Mr Crawford had donated to Portrush lifeboat station in Northern Ireland for the build of their new lifeboat. In 2019, Laura organised a fundraising swim in memory of her father that raised significant funds for the RNLI.

As well as a long family association with the lifeboats, Laura’s husband Caleb is honorary treasurer for both Lough Derg RNLI’s lifeboat station and fundraising committee, while her brother-in-law Peter Clarke was a volunteer helm with the station for 14 years.

In commending Laura for the award, RNLI director of fundraising Jayne George wrote: “Your productive, innovative and reliable attitude has not only optimised our fundraising opportunities at local events but throughout the pandemic has raised more than £2,000 in Christmas card and gift sales alone.”

Of the volunteer’s hard work throughout these difficult past two years, Jayne added that Laura’s enthusiasm and dedication “embodies the RNLI core values of being courageous, trustworthy, selfless and dependable”.

Laura said it is a “great honour to be a part of an organisation that is such a force for good in the world. I’m thrilled to receive this award.”

Niamh McCutcheon, chair of the Lough Derg RNLI fundraising branch and member of the Irish Council of the RNLI. added that she is “delighted to see Laura’s commitment, dedication and significant efforts acknowledged with this award”.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI shop, located in the harbour beside the busy East pier is the location for a new community defibrillator, donated by the family of Larry Costello, who died following a cardiac arrest in 2016. The family have funded six defibrillators which are located around the local area. Dun Laoghaire RNLI is a fitting final location, as volunteer lifeboat crewmember Gary Hayes has helped the family with the project, through his role with the Dalkey Community First Responders Group and as a RNLI crewmember.

In funding the defibrillators, the family wanted the community to have access to them in busy public areas and in doing so, to take away the fear that people have in using them. The Dalkey Community First Responders will undertake the upkeep and maintenance of the defibrillators and this one will remain charged by the RNLI’s electricity supply for the shop, which is located behind the lifeboat station.

Larry was born and raised in Dun Laoghaire and raised his family with wife Audrey in Glasthule. A much-loved member of the community, Larry worked in Blackrock Park and coached a local football team in Presentation College. When he died of a cardiac arrest, his family wanted to do something in his memory that could help another family in a similar situation. With the support of their friends and the people Larry coached and helped during his life, the family raised €14,000 and bought six defibrillators. They are placed at McCauley’s Chemist in Glasthule, the Sallynoggin Inn, the Igo Inn in Ballybrack, Eden Villas in Glasthule, Dun Laoghaire Marina and finally at the Dun Laoghaire RNLI shop beside the East Pier.

Larry’s family recent visited the lifeboat station to officially unveil the final defibrillator along with some members of Dun Laoghaire RNLI, including lifeboat crewmember Gary Hayes, who the family credits with helping them put their plan into action.

Larry’s wife Audrey visited with their four children, Graham, Jennifer, Emma and Ian, along with in-laws and grandchildren. In welcoming the installation of the final defibrillator, Audrey said, ‘Our hope is to save lives and we are grateful to the local RNLI for letting us put the final defibrillator at their shop, which sees so many people walk by every day. We never thought we would raise enough to fund six of these and it’s all thanks to our friends and neighbours in our local community and beyond. Larry was so well-loved, and I think people wanted to show that. We are so grateful for their generosity. Thank you too to Gary Hayes from Dun Laoghaire RNLI and Dalkey Community First Responders who helped us with this endeavour and suggested the station for the final defibrillator. It is a very fitting location.’

Dun Laoghaire RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew member Gary Hayes added, ‘We are delighted to have the RNLI be home to one of Larry’s defibrillators. While the lifeboat crew are here to save lives at sea, we are happy to have a lifesaving piece of equipment on land too, at the wall of our retail shop and available for any member of the public to use should they need it. There is no training necessary, and the instructions are clear and easy to follow. Well done to the family and friends of Larry for this fantastic gift to the community.

The family have asked that if anyone would like to donate to the upkeep and maintenance of the defibrillators, they contact the Dalkey Community First Responders.

Harland & Wolff, the iconic shipyard with over 160 years of maritime and offshore engineering pedigree, is delighted to announce it has signed a framework agreement with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) for the haul-out, repairs, maintenance, refurbishment and associated works for the RNLI's fleet of lifeboats.

Under the terms of this framework agreement, Harland & Wolff (Appledore) will be responsible for the repairs, maintenance and other works programmes defined by RNLI for its fleet of lifeboats and other vessels. This agreement will span multiple years and each docking will be priced as a bespoke agreement based on the scope of works required to be performed on each vessel.

As part of this agreement, Harland & Wolff will also support the RNLI with free bi-annual haulouts and wash down of its Appledore lifeboat.

The RNLI currently has a fleet of 431 lifeboats and 238 lifeboat stations that will require repairs and maintenance on a regular basis in order to keep them active and ready for deployment. Its Appledore yard will be working in conjunction with RNLI's internal team to perform defined works programmes.

John Wood, Group CEO of Harland & Wolff, commented: "I am delighted that Appledore has signed this framework agreement with the RNLI. The RNLI is a much-respected institution, and we are privileged to be hosting its vessels at Appledore. Our capacity, capability and proximity to the RNLI's main centres of activity has been crucial to the award of this contract. This, once again, demonstrates that our strategy to be geographically diverse in order to attract local business is sound and bearing fruit. I look forward to a long-standing and growing relationship with the RNLI in the months and years ahead and will be looking at opportunities to support them, not only from Appledore, but also from all our sites across the UK."

Harland & Wolff is a multisite fabrication company, operating in the maritime and offshore industry through five markets: commercial, cruise and ferry, defence, energy and renewables and six services: technical services, fabrication and construction, decommissioning, repair and maintenance, in-service support and conversion.

Its Belfast yard is one of Europe’s largest heavy engineering facilities, with deep water access, two of Europe’s largest drydocks, ample quayside and vast fabrication halls. As a result of the acquisition of Harland & Wolff (Appledore) in August 2020, the company has been able to capitalise on opportunities at both ends of the ship-repair and shipbuilding markets where there will be significant demand.

In February 2021, the company acquired the assets of two Scottish-based yards along the east and west coasts. Now known as Harland & Wolff (Methil) and Harland & Wolff (Arnish), these facilities will focus on fabrication work within the renewable, energy and defence sectors.

Harland & Wolff is a wholly owned subsidiary of Harland & Wolff Group Holdings plc (previously known as InfraStrata plc), a London Stock Exchange-listed firm. In addition, it also owns the Islandmagee gas storage project, which is expected to provide 25% of the UK’s natural gas storage capacity and to benefit the Northern Irish economy as a whole when completed.

Published in Shipyards
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Grab your antlers, lace up those hooves – help save lives at sea by getting on your running shoes for the RNLI's Reindeer Run at Fota House and Gardens in Cork Harbour.

The RNLI is calling on the people of Cork to do their bit and join the RNLI's 5K Reindeer Run at Fota House and Gardens at 11 am on Sunday, 5 December to help raise vital funds to support volunteer crews in their mission to save every one.

RNLI volunteer lifeboat crews across Ireland launched 945 times last year, coming to the aid of 1,147 people, 13 of whom were lives saved. That was an average of three people aided each day - rescues which were only possible because of the donations made to the charity by supporters.

It is hoped hundreds of people will don a pair of antlers or festive attire and join mascot Rookie the Reindeer to raise funds for the charity. All those participating will receive a medal. Runners, who must register (see below), and buy tickets for the event in advance, are encouraged to raise sponsorship which will go towards saving lives on the water.

RNLI Reindeer Run

Every time an RNLI crew launches, they are determined to save everyone. But they can't do it without people like you. Raising money through the Reindeer Run is a fun and festive way to get active and be a lifesaver, because you'll be raising the vital funds that power the crew. It helps the RNLI recruit and train volunteers and could fund the kit they need to protect themselves. It helps ensure a lifeboat is ready when the call comes, and it helps deliver water safety advice far and wide.

Eolan Walsh, Ballycotton RNLI Coxswain says: 'The Reindeer Run is more important than ever this year. We always have to be ready in case the pagers go at Christmas, but it's a big boost to know the Reindeer runners have been giving their support at this busy time of year to help ensure we can launch.

'It can be hard on our family and friends if we disappear halfway through Christmas dinner, but the sea and the dangers it can bring never takes a holiday, so nor can we. Fundraising events are our own call for help, as we rely on the generosity of the public to fund our rescues and kit that helps keep the crews safe when they risk their lives for others.'

To register for the Reindeer Run at Fota House and Gardens or to set up your own virtual one, please visit rnli.org/reindeerireland

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Wicklow RNLI all-weather lifeboat RNLB Joanna and Henry Williams launched at 8:10 am this morning (Monday 1 November), to investigate a report of a ten-metre fishing vessel in difficulties north of Wicklow harbour.

The lifeboat was alongside the drifting fishing vessel twenty minutes later. After a quick assessment, It was found to have a rope fouled in the propeller and unable to get back to port. Coxswain Keogh decided the best option was to tow the boat back to Wicklow harbour. Weather conditions at the scene were moderate sea with good visibility.

A tow line was established, and the fishing vessel was towed into Wicklow harbour and secured alongside the South quay at 9:30 am.

With the three fishermen landed safely ashore, the lifeboat returned to station.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Dunmore East RNLI’s Shannon Class lifeboat 13-41 ‘William and Agnes Wray’ officially went on service today (Saturday 6 November 2021). The Shannon class lifeboat arrived in Dunmore East Harbour on Sunday 26th September, and since then the volunteer lifeboat crew have trained tirelessly, becoming familiar with the new electronic technology and jet propulsion system of the vessel. The €2.4 million all-weather vessel is the first state of the art Shannon class lifeboat to be based in the south-east.

The Irish Coast Guard was informed by the RNLI that the ‘William and Agnes Wray’ is officially on service from 6 pm Saturday 6, November, replacing the station’s Trent class lifeboat.

"The €2.4m vessel is the first state of the art Shannon class lifeboat to be based in the south-east"

It’s a bittersweet moment for the lifeboat crew and fundraisers at Dunmore East RNLI, as the introduction of the Shannon class lifeboat signals the end of an era for the station’s current Trent class lifeboat, Elizabeth and Ronald, which has now departed Dunmore East harbour for the last time under the watchful eyes of a crowd who came to pay their respects and say goodbye. The lifeboat has been saving lives at sea there since October 1996.

Thankfully, it is not the end for Elizabeth and Ronald, as she will get an electronics upgrade and will go into the Trent class relief fleet for Ireland where she will continue to save lives at sea when and where ever she is needed.

Dunmore East RNLI Coxswain Roy Abrahamsson said ‘This week our crew were put through their paces by RNLI assessors where they demonstrated their ability to operate the new lifeboat effectively and safely. Everyone at the station is now ready and fully trained to operate this new lifeboat.’

‘The Shannon Class lifeboat is the most advanced lifeboat in the RNLI’s fleet, it means we can get to a casualty safer and faster than ever before. I am immensely proud of our volunteer crew who put in a huge effort by giving up their time and being away from their families to complete the training to enable the ‘William and Agnes Wray’ to go on service.’

"The Elizabeth and Ronald has served us well here in Dunmore East and she will be dearly missed"

The Shannon class lifeboat is the first modern all-weather lifeboat to be propelled by waterjets instead of traditional propellers, making it the most agile and manoeuvrable all-weather lifeboat in the RNLI’s fleet. The naming of the Shannon class of lifeboat follows a tradition of naming lifeboats after rivers but it's the first time an Irish river has been chosen and was done so to reflect the commitment and dedication of Irish lifeboat crew for generations.

Coxswain Abrahamsson continued ‘The Elizabeth and Ronald has served us well here in Dunmore East and she will be dearly missed, she is a fine lifeboat, and I am glad she will continue to save lives and serve the people of Ireland in the relief fleet’.

End of an era - the Waterford Harbour station’s current Trent class lifeboat, Elizabeth and Ronald has now departed Dunmore East harbour End of an era - the Waterford Harbour station’s current Trent class lifeboat, Elizabeth and Ronald has now departed Dunmore East harbour

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The team at Skerries RNLI in North Co Dublin is calling for new volunteers to help them to save lives at sea.

In particular, the charity is looking for new volunteers to take up the roles of inshore lifeboat crew, shore crew and tractor driver.

Volunteers in each of these roles play a critical part in ensuring that the inshore Atlantic 85 lifeboat is launched quickly and safely and can continue to save lives at sea in the local community.

“Volunteering with us gives people the opportunity to make a real difference in their local community, to save lives and become part of the larger RNLI family,” Skerries RNLI lifeboat operations manager Niall McGrotty says.

“We can’t keep people safe without the support of our wonderful volunteers, who truly make a difference every day no matter which role they are fulfilling.

“Becoming a volunteer in one of these roles is a great chance to play a crucial part in helping to save lives. We’re ideally looking for enthusiastic people who live or work within close proximity to the station.”

The RNLI provides first-class training and equipment, guidance and support to all volunteers, from volunteer lifeboat crew to shop volunteers and event marshals.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The volunteer crew of Bundoran RNLI were called out on Wednesday afternoon (27 October) to reports of a cow in distress in the surf at Tullan Strand in the Donegal town.

A passer-by had spotted the animal in the water and immediately alerted the Irish Coast Guard at Malin Head who in turn paged the lifeboat crew.

The four crew launched the inshore lifeboat just after 4.30pm and made their way in rough seas to Tullan Strand to assess the situation, while a number of other volunteer crew attended via the shore to offer visual backup to the lifeboat crew.

As the swell was between three and four metres, conditions were difficult for the lifeboat to get closer to the shore with visibility of the cow also tricky for the shore crew.

Daisy Mae following her rescue on Wednesday | Credit: Daimon FergusDaisy Mae following her rescue on Wednesday | Credit: Daimon Fergus

The animal was soon spotted, however, by which time the Sligo-based coastguard helicopter Rescue 118 was on scene. Using the noise and downdraft of the helicopter, its crew were able to encourage the cow back to safety on the shore.

Both the lifeboat and helicopter stayed on scene to ensure the safety of the cow which was tended to on shore before both units were stood down.

Speaking on return to the lifeboat station, Bundoran RNLI helm Michael Patton said: “We were delighted to see a successful outcome from today’s callout and would like to thank those who assisted in the rescue of the cow.

“If you are ever worried that your pet or animal is in danger, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard, rather than putting yourself at risk by going into the water after them.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched on Tuesday afternoon (26 October) to assess a fishing boat with three people on board, which had broken down around a mile northeast of Knockninny on Upper Lough Erne.

Once on scene, the lifeboat located the casualty vessel which had blown onto an exposed shoreline on an island amid Force 4-5 southwesterly gusts.

The volunteer helm and crew assessed the vessel and the wellbeing of the persons on board from a close but safe distance, and found they were all well.

It was established that the casualty vessel had suffered engine failure, and due to the strong winds had been blown onto the shoreline of the island.

After a full review of the situation, and due to the large waves landing on the island shoreline, the helm deemed the safest option was to put two volunteer crew from the lifeboat onto the other side of the island which was sheltered from the waves.

The crew then walked the three persons across the island to this safer location to get onboard the lifeboat. They were brought back to the nearest safe marina which was Knockninny public jetty.

The volunteer crew of the lifeboat then went back and refloated the fishing boat from the shoreline and brought it to the safety of Knockninny.

Speaking following the callout, Carrybridge lifeboat operations manager Stephen Scott had advice for all boat users in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.

“Before setting out on your journey, please check the weather forecast for the day ahead, have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble and have lifejackets for all onboard,” he said.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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