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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

Kilmore Quay RNLI rescued three people on Saturday afternoon (28 August) after their 6.3m cruiser got into difficulty 50 miles off the Wexford coast while they were on an angling day trip.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their all-weather Tamar class relief lifeboat Victor Freeman, by the Irish Coast Guard at 1.30pm to assess the situation where the vessel was reported to be taking on water 50 miles south of Kilmore Quay. Tenby RNLI in Wales was also requested and the station’s all-weather lifeboat, also a Tamar, launched too.

Kilmore Quay RNLI’s lifeboat under Coxswain Philip Walsh and with four crew members onboard launched within minutes and made its way to the scene where a fishing trawler was also standing by to assist.

The cruiser had launched earlier that day from Kilmore Quay for a day’s deep-sea fishing. Weather and sea conditions were good at the time. However, when the crew noticed their boat was taking on water, they turned to return to shore and called for assistance.

Both lifeboats arrived on scene within minutes of each other with the crews first checking that all onboard were safe and well. Having assessed the situation, a decision was made to allow the cruiser to continue to make its way back to port under its own power escorted by the Kilmore Quay RNLI while Tenby RNLI returned to their station.

All arrived safely back to Kilmore Quay at 7.05 pm.

Fishing boat

Meanwhile a week earlier, Kilmore Quay RNLI came to the aid of the crew onboard a 24m fishing trawler that had run aground on their return from fishing grounds to their home port. On this occasion on Saturday 21 August, the crew were requested to launch at 6.22am and assess the situation two miles east of Kilmore Quay.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eugene Kehoe and with five crew members onboard arrived on scene within 10 minutes of launching and again checked that all onboard were safe. A decision was made to establish a towline to free the vessel, but the falling tide made it impossible to move the vessel at that time. It was agreed to return later when the rising tide would allow the vessel to be more easily released. The crew of the fishing vessel remained onboard to monitor their boat.

At 4pm, Kilmore Quay RNLI returned and re-assessed the situation before successfully establishing a towline and freeing the vessel. The boat returned to Kilmore Quay under escort by the lifeboat and another fishing vessel as a precaution.

Speaking following both call outs, Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager John Grace, said: ‘During the first call out, the falling tide did not allow for the boat to be freed so it became a waiting game until the tide came back to a level to allow us to safely try again and on the second attempt the crew were successful. The fishing crew did a great job monitoring the situation onboard until it became possible to free it again with assistance from our lifeboat crew.

‘In what was the second call out in a week, we were happy to see that the boat’s crew was able to return safely to Kilmore Quay under the boat’ own power. The crew made the right decision to call for assistance when they did as they were in a precarious position taking on water in a busy shipping lane.

‘We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always wear a lifejacket and to always carry a means of calling for help. If you do get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dunmore East RNLI’s lifeboat volunteers were delighted to receive monies raised from the sales of the book charting the history of the Co Waterford lifeboat.

Dauntless Courage: Celebrating the History of the Dunmore East RNLI, Their Crews and the Maritime Heritage of the Local Community was written, published and sold out during lockdown a year ago.

Restrictions and lockdowns made it impossible for author David Carroll to be in Dunmore East while writing his book, But thankfully David and his family were able to visit the Dunmore Lifeboat station recently, where he was wholeheartedly welcomed by the local lifeboat volunteers.

David is the son of Captain Desmond Carroll, a former Harbour Master in Dunmore. He grew up in Dunmore East and through he moved away from the village in his 20s to pursue a career, he says he has retained a great love for the maritime heritage he inherited growing up in the village.

The book is described as a labour of love, involving several years of researching and writing. The RNLI supported the project, with members of Dunmore East RNLI forming a publishing committee and a total of 66 businesses contributing to the cost of printing. It means that all proceeds go to the charity that saves lives at sea.

Dunmore East RNLI volunteers with author David Carrol and his family at the lifeboat station | Credit: RNLI/Neville MurphyDunmore East RNLI volunteers with author David Carrol and his family at the lifeboat station | Credit: RNLI/Neville Murphy

Recently David was finally able to hand over the huge cheque to the very appreciative volunteers of Dunmore East RNLI.

“I felt very privileged to have been invited to write a history of the Dunmore East lifeboats,” he said. “I enjoyed every single minute carrying out the necessary research and writing the various chapters, but the success of the book is down to all the volunteers and the great team, organised by Brendan Dunne who promoted, packaged, and distributed the book in difficult circumstances.

“A special word of thanks is due to all who gave us permission to use their interesting photographs and wonderful paintings. Our printers, DVF Print and Graphic Solutions, designed and produced a magnificent book that we all can be proud of and will be a fitting testament to all who served in the station since the Henry Dodd first arrived in Dunmore East.

Brendan Dunne of Dunmore East RNLI’s crew said: “As volunteer crew of the Dunmore East lifeboat, we are delighted with David’s book Dauntless Courage and grateful for such a significant amount being raised for our charity.

“The book itself is well written and researched. It truly captures the legacy of those that have crewed the lifeboats here since 1884 and of the lifesaving and maritime heritage of the village. It ensures their contribution to saving lives at sea in all weather conditions will not be forgotten.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A lone sailor was rescued after his boat suffers engine failure and a sail blow out off the Old Head of Kinsale.

The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Trent Class RNLI Lifeboat was called out this afternoon Tuesday at 2 pm to go to the aid of a 30-foot yacht with a lone sailor on board that got into difficulties two miles south-west of the Old Head of Kinsale in West Cork. The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Lifeboat, Frederick Storey Cockburn under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell and a crew of 5 were away quickly from their moorings, after being alerted by the Coastguard that the yacht had suffered engine failure and a sail blow out on passage from Glandore to Kinsale.

Once the Lifeboat reached the causality at 2.26 pm, Lifeboat Coxswain O'Farrell assessed the situation. As the casualty was completely disabled and conditions at sea were worsening, a decision was taken to put the Lifeboat towline on board the yacht and proceed under tow to the nearest port of Kinsale. Conditions at sea today were fresh and blustery Force 5 winds with strong 3 metre swells off the Old Head. The Lifeboat proceeded to tow the causality back to Kinsale at a slow, safe speed and arrived at the safe surrounds of the Harbour Marina at 4.30 pm. The sailor was mighty pleased to see the Lifeboat today and expressed his extreme thanks to all involved in today’s rescue.

The RNLI Lifeboat crewmembers under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell after they arrived back to base in CourtmacsherryThe RNLI Lifeboat crewmembers under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell after they arrived back to base in Courtmacsherry

The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat voluntary Deputy Launching Authority Vincent O'Donovan said, “With the freshening winds today, it was great to reach the causality so quickly and give the Lone sailor the comfort that he required. Great praise is due again for the fast response of all the crew and officers who left their workplaces and rushed to the station to help a fellow seaman in distress at sea this afternoon”.

The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat Crew involved in this afternoon’s callout were Coxswain Sean O Farrell, Mechanic Stuart Russell and crewmembers Mark John Gannon, Dara Gannon, Dave Philips and Dean Hennessy.

This was the 21st callout of 2021 for the All-Weather Lifeboat Station in Courtmacsherry.

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The Aran Islands volunteer RNLI lifeboat crew were requested by the Irish Coast Guard to launch their All-Weather Severn Lifeboat at 2.48 pm, yesterday (Monday, August 30th). An 11.6 metre angling boat, with nine people aboard, was experiencing engine problems at the back of Inis Mór, the largest of the three Aran Islands, while out on an angling trip.

The lifeboat launched under Coxswain John O'Donnell and a full crew and headed straight for the boat. Weather conditions at the time of launching were good, with a slight East North East breeze, calm seas and good visibility

Once on the scene, the Volunteer Lifeboat crew checked that all aboard were safe and sound, before establishing a tow line.

With the tow line safely secured, the lifeboat proceeded back towards Kilronan Harbour, where the angling boat was brought alongside the pontoon.

Speaking after the call out Aran Islands RNLI Coxswain John O'Donnell said: 'thankfully the weather was calm and a quick response time from the volunteer crew, meant the angling boat and all aboard were brought safely ashore without delay.'

 

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Baltimore RNLI was called out to provide assistance to six people on a yacht in difficulty yesterday afternoon (Sunday 29 August) off East Calf Island in West Cork.

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 3 pm, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go to the assistance of a 26-foot yacht, with six people on board, which had dismasted just off the East Calf Island in Roaring Water Bay.

The Baltimore all-weather lifeboat crew arrived at the casualty vessel at 3.12 pm and two volunteer lifeboat crewmen were put aboard to assist in the derigging of the mast. Once the mast was secured aboard the yacht and the owners of the yacht were happy the RNLI crewmen returned to the lifeboat and the yacht was able to make its own way under engine to the nearest safe and suitable port. The lifeboat then returned to the station, arriving at 3.55 pm.

There were five volunteer crew onboard the lifeboat, Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Sean McCarthy and crew members Brendan Cottrell, Colin Whooley and Eoin Ryan. Conditions at sea during the call were calm with a south-easterly force 2 wind, no sea swell and good visibility.

 

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Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat and rescue water craft were launched yesterday afternoon (Saturday 28 August) to assess a vessel in distress with five people on board.

The sport cruiser had run aground some two miles upstream from Bellanaleck in the vicinity of Tamlaght Bay.

Upon arrival, the lifeboat crew assessed the vessel and those on board, and determined that the boat was slightly aground in its present position.

With the owner’s permission, the cruiser was refloated and an alongside tow was set up to bring it into deeper water.

Further checks were carried out and the vessel was found to be in perfect working order before it was allowed to continue its journey.

Speaking following the callout, Chris Cathcart of Carrybridge RNLI offered advice for boat uses this UK bank holiday weekend.

“We would ask that everyone have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

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Fethard RNLI came to the aid of two adults and a child yesterday evening (Thursday 26 August) after their 17ft Dory boat suffered engine failure and was in danger of verging into a nearby shipping lane.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their inshore lifeboat shortly after 5pm after the Irish Coast Guard was notified that a boat with three people onboard was in difficulty east of the fairway buoy near Loftus Hall.

The lifeboat helmed by Thomas Stafford and with crew members Nadia Blanchfield and Mick Roche onboard, launched immediately and made its way to the scene approximately 10 minutes away.

Weather conditions at the time were good with a light sea breeze and an incoming tide.

Arriving on scene, the lifeboat crew assessed the situation before making the decision to tow the vessel with its occupants onboard to the nearest safe port at Duncannon.

Speaking following the call out, Walter Foley, Fethard RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘While everyone was safe and well and not in any immediate danger, the crew on the vessel made the right decision to call for help when they did as the broken-down boat could have entered the nearby shipping lane. We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always wear a lifejacket and to always carry a means of calling for help like the group onboard did yesterday evening, that is always the right thing to do.’

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Portaferry RNLI were called out yesterday evening (Thursday 26 August) at 5.44pm after members of the public reported three people in the water after their small punt capsized on Strangford Lough in Northern Ireland.

Helmed by Fergal Glynn and with two crew onboard, the lifeboat was on scene close to the Walter rocks within minutes and the volunteers recovered the casualties from the water one by one.

After ensuring they did not require any medical assistance, the lifeboat crew took the casualties ashore and transferred them into the care of Portaferry coastguard rescue team.

The lifeboat crew then returned to the capsized punt to right it and take it under tow to Cook Street Quay.

Less than 24 hours before, on Wednesday evening (25 August), the lifeboat volunteers were called out to reports of two kayakers thought to be in difficulty off Kilclief in Co Down.

The lifeboat, helmed by Chris Adair and with two crew onboard, launched shortly after 8.30pm and was on scene at the Strangford Narrows within minutes.

However, after a thorough search of the area the volunteer crew found nothing of concern and returned to station at 9.25pm.

Commenting on both callouts, Portaferry RNLI press officer Jordan Conway said: “Our initial callout turned out to be a false alarm with good intent. The second callout was also initiated by a concerned member of the public and we would like to thank all members of the public for being so alert and taking the appropriate action.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Lough Derg RNLI’s lifeboat volunteers were diverted from exercise in Dromineer Bay last night (Thursday 26 August) to assist two people on a 12ft fishing boat with engine failure just off the Goat Road, on the eastern shore of the lough.

The RNLI crew plotted a course to the Goat Road, and as the made their way under nightfall they monitored the fast moving vessels operating in the area on radar.

Arriving on scene within 20 minutes, the lifeboat was directed to the casualty vessel by the people on board using torches.

The fishing boat was floating close to a rocky shore south of the Goat Road, so the lifeboat made a cautious approach.

Once alongside, the lifeboat crew found both people on board safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. The duo reported that their boat had glanced off a rock and suffered engine failure.

Given the hour and the drop in temperature, lifeboat helm Eleanor Hooker decided the safest option was to set up an alongside tow and take the vessel with her passengers to Dromineer, the safest close harbour.

Without sufficient warm clothing, the two people took shelter in the forward cabin of their boat until it was safety tied alongside in Dromineer before 11.20pm.

Peter Kennedy, deputy launching authority at Lough Derg RNLI, advises all water users to “study your charts and be prepared; anticipate a drop in temperature with nightfall”.

The lifeboat crew on this callout were Eleanor Hooker, Doireann Kennedy, Tom Hayes and Ciara Lynch.

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Just before tea-time yesterday (25 August) Serena Friel and Karen Reynolds swam under the Town Bridge in Athlone to complete an amazing 32km swim, the entire length of Lough Ree, in 10 hours and 13 minutes raising thousands of euro for Lough Ree RNLI by completing this daunting challenge.

Athlone women Serena and Karen enjoy a regular swim at Coosan Point in the shadow of the emerging Lough Ree RNLI boathouse which is due for completion next month. With a local community fundraising project ongoing the two swimmers decided to play their part and the ‘Lough Ree 32k Challenge’ was born.

After weeks of training, coaching and planning and with great organisational support from work colleagues, family and friends the girls took to the water at 7 am yesterday morning at Lanesborough Bridge at the north of Lough Ree on the Longford/Roscommon border.

Setting off in foggy conditions, Karen was first in the water for this relay swim. Herself and Serena alternated every hour on their way down the lake. The decision to delay the challenge a few days due to weather patterns proved very wise and the swimmers enjoyed excellent conditions on the water throughout the swim.

Lough Ree swimmers - (L-R) Serena Friel and Karen DelaneyLough Ree swimmers - (L-R) Serena Friel and Karen Reynolds

As the swim progressed the support crew on the accompanying boats realised that something special was on the cards. On board reports ticked off all the landmarks down the lake from Quaker Island on down towards Hare Island. In Athlone and on social media excitement began to mount when by mid-afternoon the swimmers had passed Hudson Bay.

Large crowds of well-wishers and supporters gathered on the quayside in Athlone, from the White Bridge to the Town Bridge in anticipation of their arrival. Just after 5pm accompanied by the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer crew on board the ‘Tara Scougall’ and the support flotilla, which had been alongside them all day, Serena Friel and Karen Delaney crossed the finish line in Athlone to loud applause.

In completing the ‘Lough Ree 32k Challenge’ the women set a record that will take some beating. Following the record-breaking achievement, Serena thanked ‘swimming partner Karen, coach David Warby and all who supported the challenge in any way.’

Lough Ree RNLI Operations Manager Jude Kilmartin, said: ‘the charity is most grateful to Serena and Karen for a terrific initiative which has already raised over €6,000 for the charity.’

The Gofundme page remains open for donations here

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