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Displaying items by tag: Arklow

Arklow RNLI launched on Sunday (8 October) at around 11am following a pager alert by the Irish Coast Guard reporting swimmers in difficulty at the Co Wicklow town’s South Beach.

The volunteer crew made their way to the lifeboat station and within minutes of the request were aboard the all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr and en route to the reported location just outside Arklow Piers.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew were made aware that there were two open-water swimmers in the area, with another person on a paddleboard.

Thankfully, it was established that they were not in difficulty and the lifeboat stood by the swimmers as they completed their swim and returned to shore.

Initial reports had said there were swimmers in difficulty and shouting for help but it was established they were communicating within the group and the shouts for help were misheard.

Following the call-out, Mark Corcoran, volunteer lifeboat press officer at Arklow RNLI said: “In this case, it turned out there was no one in difficulty. However, we would always encourage anyone who suspects they have heard any kind of call for help to phone 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

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Two men and a boy were rescued by the Courtown RNLI on August 9th after their cabin cruiser experienced engine failure off the coast of Cahore.

The Arklow RNLI initially responded to the distress call and had the vessel under tow when the Courtown crew arrived on the scene. Courtown's inshore lifeboat took over the tow and safely brought the cruiser into Courtown Harbour.

The rescued individuals were all wearing lifejackets and had a means of communication to call for help. Jim Murphy, Deputy Launching Authority of Courtown RNLI, emphasised the importance of following safety recommendations and contacting the Coast Guard in an emergency.

Courtown and Arklow RNLI attend to the broken down cruiserCourtown and Arklow RNLI attend to the broken down cruiser

The successful joint operation between the two RNLI stations highlights their crucial role in ensuring the safety of those at sea.

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Following a pager alert at 5.37 pm on Wednesday, 7 June, the volunteer lifeboat crew made their way to the station and, within minutes of the request, were aboard RNLB Ger Tigchlearr and en route to the reported location some six miles southeast of Arklow Harbour.

In a north-easterly wind with a 1.5-metre wave height, the all-weather Trent class lifeboat made its way to the reported position.

As Afloat reported earlier, once on scene, the vessel, which had been part of the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race fleet, reported it had suffered rudder failure but had managed to rig an emergency steering system and could now proceed slowly back to Arklow under its own power.

The lifeboat was requested to stand by and then escorted the vessel back to port at Arklow.

Arklow RNLI crew on the call out were Coxswain Ned Dillon, Brendan Dillon, James Russell, Craig O’Reilly and James McAnaspie.

Following the call out, Mark Corcoran, volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer at Arklow RNLI said: 'Thanks to our crew for being there when needed, and to the crew of the yacht whose experience gave them the ability to come to port under their own power.'

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

The volunteer lifeboat crew with Arklow RNLI launched in the early hours of Thursday morning (8 June) to reports of a vessel in difficulty some 10 miles south-east of the Co Wicklow town.

In a northeasterly wind with a 1.2-metre wave height, the all- weather Trent class lifeboat Ger Tigchlear made its way to the reported position and once on scene, the lifeboat crew confirmed that the sailboat had suffered engine failure.

It was decided to put a lifeboat crew member onboard the vessel to assist the lone sailor with rigging and running the towline.

Once this was done, the lifeboat took the casualty vessel under tow and returned to the nearest port of Arklow, arriving at 9am.

The Arklow lifeboat crew on this callout were coxswain Ned Dillon and crew members Craig O’Reilly, John Tyrrell, Dave Molloy, Ken O’Toole, Josh McAnaspie and James Russell.

Following the callout, volunteer lifeboat press officer Mark Corcoran said: “It’s been a busy couple of days at Arklow. It is great to see the training that we do paying off, in the assistance we are providing.

“Given the recent good weather, we are reminding everyone to stay safe and respect the water.”

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Seven members of Arklow RNLI have been honoured for their roles in a challenging and exhausting service, almost seven hours in duration, which saw a crew of three people, onboard a nine-metre yacht rescued. For his exceptional display of seamanship in the service, a Signed Letter of Thanks from the Chairman of the Institution was awarded to Arklow RNLI Coxswain Brendan Dillon. For their teamwork in challenging sea conditions and their part in completing a highly effective service, individual Chief Executive Commendations were awarded to 2nd Mechanic Eddie McElheron and volunteer crewmembers Austin Gaffney, Geoffrey Kearns, Trevor Conroy, Craig O’Reilly, Daniel Downey.

As Afloat reported, the rescue was carried out on 4 August 2020, 24 nautical miles east-southeast of Arklow. The 9-metre yacht, Infinite Jest was on passage from Newlyn, in England to Largs, in Scotland, and was experiencing very poor weather and rough sea conditions, with the crew of three people, suffering from exhaustion and seasickness. It was a demanding service, also involving a tow from the lifeboat, which lasted over three hours, in winds up to Force 8, with upwards of 5-metre swells, at night. The service itself lasted nearly seven hours.

On launching in Force 7 conditions, at 6.58 pm that evening, the Coxswain of Arklow lifeboat, Brendan Dillon, headed towards the last reported position of the yacht, Infinite Jest, immediately feeling the effect of the conditions as they left the shelter afforded by land. On receiving an updated position from the Coast Guard, he adjusted his course to cross the Arklow Bank, to intercept the yacht. In doing this, while operating in such challenging sea conditions, he enabled the lifeboat to significantly reduce their time to reach the casualty vessel.

On successfully crossing Arklow Bank, the lifeboat’s primary navigation system was non-operational, with only the secondary GPS fully functional. The Coxswain requested the Navigator, Trevor Conroy, to calculate their position using speed and direction. In Force eight winds and a five-metre swell, the Arklow lifeboat Ger Tigchelaar arrived on scene at 8.20pm, having successfully located the casualty vessel.

The yacht, which was sailing with only her jib set, was instructed to take up a course behind the lifeboat, to be escorted to Wicklow Harbour, as the nearest safe port. After an hour on this course the yacht’s skipper informed the lifeboat, by VHF Radio, that it was proving difficult to maintain their course under sail and they were making poor headway. The Coxswain then asked the skipper if they could take in their sail and use their engine to maintain their course, behind the lifeboat, until they were closer to land.

Arklow RNLI brings the distressed yacht alongside at Wicklow Harbour in August 2020 Photo: RNLI/Tommy DoverArklow RNLI brings the distressed yacht alongside at Wicklow Harbour in August 2020 Photo: RNLI/Tommy Dover

As darkness was falling, the lifeboat took the yacht under tow, as the crew were exhausted and suffering from seasickness. Three members of the Arklow Lifeboat crew, led by Austin Gaffney, passed a heaving line to the casualty vessel. In very challenging conditions, the tow was established with the lifeboat maintaining radio contact with the yacht every 15 minutes, providing technical guidance, encouraging the tired crew to hydrate, offering support and informing them of progress to safe harbour. Wicklow RNLI was also placed on standby to launch if required, with their shore crew ready to receive both vessels into Wicklow Harbour.

As the lifeboat neared the Harbour, the crew of the yacht informed them that due to crew exhaustion, they could not make the berth under their own power and would require further support. The Coxswain requested Eddie McElheron to board the yacht in full protective equipment to assist. The lifeboat arrived at Wicklow Harbour at 12.55 am with the Infinite Jest on an alongside tow.

In recognising Coxswain Brendan Dillon’s role in commanding the lifeboat during such a challenging rescue, RNLI Chair Stuart Popham said he ‘showed excellent leadership qualities and sound decision making under the pressure of knowing what a precarious situation the casualty was in, and the risks presented to his lifeboat and crew. Throughout, he led by example, extolling the core values of the RNLI in all his actions.’

In awarding the lifeboat crew for their actions on the service, Mr Popham added, ‘This was a demanding service. The sea conditions, towing at night and crew transfer all presented risk and challenges. The crew demonstrated courage and resilience throughout. The deck crew on the Lifeboat performed faultlessly, showing skill, teamwork and a high degree of professionalism.’

The presentations were made during Arklow RNLI’s sold-out fundraising event ‘Dan’s Hurry to the Curry, which was held at the Arklow Bay Hotel after an absence of a few years due to the pandemic. The awards were presented on the night by RNLI Trustee and Chair of the Irish Council, Mr John Killeen.

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Following a two-year break, Arklow RNLI’s Hurry to the Curry fundraiser returns on Friday 27 January at the Arklow Bay Hotel from 8pm.

Also known as Dan’s Lifeboat Special, the event has gone from strength to strength and continues to be one of the most enjoyable and well supported nights out in the events calendar, the lifeboat station says.

Culinary masterpieces prepared by Anne and her team of volunteers range from hot curry dishes and a wonderful array of fresh sea food — prawns, lobster, crab, monkfish and salmon— to cold-meat platters, vegetarian dishes and salads of all kinds.

Advice is to come to the bash good and hungry: “It’s the best value meal you’ll have had since [the last] event and quite simply the best craic to be had on the east coast.”

There are spot prizes galore and some lovely raffle and auction items. Music will be provided by the Joe Dolan Experience followed by a DJ till late. There might even be some special guests.

Arklow RNLI’s crew are pulling out all the stops to ensure a magical night is had by all. Lifeboat press officer Mark Corcoran says: “Without volunteers like our fundraising team and our lifeboat crew who still to this day give of their own time, our lifeboat couldn’t function and continue to be rescue ready. We would love to see everybody at the Arklow Bay Hotel on Friday 27 January.”

Tickets are €20 and are available from the Arklow Bay Hotel and Arklow RNLI Fundraising committee members, or you can email [email protected].

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Arklow RNLI launched on Sunday evening (11 September) to assist two people on 39ft yacht which had lost propulsion and was adrift off the Co Wexford town.

The volunteer crew made their way to the lifeboat station around 7pm and within minutes of the request were aboard the all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr and en route to the reported location.

Once afloat, the lifeboat travelled the half mile to the vessel at Arklow’s South Beach.

In wet conditions with light fading and southerly winds with wave heights of around two-and-a-half metres, the vessel had lost propulsion and tried to anchor as it drifted onto a lee shore some 50 yards from the beach.

Following an assessment by the lifeboat crew, it was decided to establish a tow to bring the vessel to safety.

A lifeboat volunteer boarded the casualty vessel to assist with rigging a tow. Once it was established, the casualty vessel was able to have its anchor hauled up and proceed with the tow back to the nearest safe port at Arklow.

Following the callout, volunteer lifeboat press officer Mark Corcoran said: “Our teams dedication and training for these scenarios really paid off this evening. Thankfully the crew on the sailing vessel had done all the right things which allowed us to get there and be able to assist.”

Arklow RNLI’s crew on this callout were coxswain Ned Dillon, John Bermingham, Eddie McElheron, Craig O’Reilly, Sinead Myler, Jimmy Myler and Dave Molloy.

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Arklow RNLI launched to the aid of five people on Wednesday evening (13 July) after their sailing vessel got into difficulty.

Volunteers were paged at 8.45pm after reports that a vessel had become entangled in fishing gear close to shore near the harbour in Arklow Bay.

The all-weather lifeboat launched shortly thereafter in calm seas with slack winds, quickly locating the casualty vessel with five people onboard.

Upon arrival, a lifeboat crew member was put aboard the vessel to assist with freeing the entanglement. Once this had been cleared, the yacht was towed back into Arklow Harbour where everybody came ashore safely.

Speaking later, Mark Corcoran, Arklow RNLI community safety officer said: “Our volunteers are always on call — huge thanks to them and their families for the amazing work they do in our community.”

The crew for this callout were coxswain Ned Dillon, Brendan Dillon, John Bermingham, Craig O’Reilly and Geoff Kearnes.

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Arklow RNLI launched yesterday morning (9 June) at around 6.30am to a request to assist two people on a fishing vessel which had lost propulsion north of the Co Wicklow town.

The volunteer crew made their way to the lifeboat station and within minutes of the request were aboard the all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr and en route to the reported location.

In a fresh southerly breeze with moderate seas, the lifeboat made its way to the reported position five miles north of Arklow. Once on scene, the casualty vessel was quickly located and it was confirmed that it had lost propulsion.

A tow line was established and the casualty vessel was towed back to the nearest safe port at Arklow, where all hands came ashore at approximately 8am.

Following the callout, Mark Corcoran, Arklow RNLI press officer said: “Thanks to our volunteer crew who at a moment’s notice go to sea to assist others. Please remember to respect the water.”

Arklow RNLI’s crew on this callout were coxswain Ned Dillon, John Tyrrell, Jimmy Myler, Sinead Myler, Craig O’Reilly and station mechanic James Russell.

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Arklow RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew were paged by the Irish Coast Guard on Bank Holiday Monday afternoon (4 June) following a report of person in the water.

The all-weather lifeboat, under coxswain Ned Dillon with crew Geoff Kearnes, James Russell, Craig O’Reilly, Austin Gaffney, Jimmy Myler and Eddie McElheron, launched shortly after 2.20pm and made their way to the scene.

Weather conditions at the time were described as good with a calm sea, light wind and good visibility.

Upon arrival at the nearby Roadstone jetty south of the Co Wicklow town, the lifeboat crew spotted two kayaks in the water, almost under the jetty.

One of the casualties had slipped from their kayak into the water and was not able to recover back onto the craft, while the second person had stayed on the kayak alongside the casualty but was unable to assist.

The casualty was recovered from the water to the lifeboat and once they were safely aboard, the second person was recovered along with both of the kayaks. The casualty was given first aid and was cold and fatigued but uninjured.

The lifeboat returned to station and both kayakers were given refreshments and warmed up before they left.

Speaking following the callout, Mark Corcoran, Arklow RNLI community safety officer said: “Thankfully we were able to assist these kayakers safely back to shore.

“Given the good weather there are a lot more people around and on the water, we would like to share the message that if you are going on or in the water: always carry a means of calling for help, always wear a lifejacket and other appropriate protection, always check the weather and tides before going to sea and please respect the water.”

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About the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race is undoubtedly one of the greatest ocean adventures on the planet, also regarded as one of its toughest endurance challenges. Taking almost a year to complete, it consists of eleven teams competing against each other on the world’s largest matched fleet of 70-foot ocean racing yachts.

The Clipper Race was established in 1996 by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first person to sail solo, non-stop, around the world in 1968-69. His aim was to allow anyone, regardless of previous sailing experience, the chance to embrace the thrill of ocean racing; it is the only event of its kind for amateur sailors. Around 40 per cent of crew are novices and have never sailed before starting a comprehensive training programme ahead of their adventure.

This unique challenge brings together everyone from chief executives to train drivers, nurses and firefighters, farmers, airline pilots and students, from age 18 upwards, to take on Mother Nature’s toughest and most remote conditions. There is no upper age limit, the oldest competitor to date is 76.

Now in its twelfth edition, the Clipper 2019-20 Race started from London, UK, on 02 September 2019.