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Displaying items by tag: Floods

Corrib Head of the River, the rowing event scheduled for Galway on Saturday, has been cancelled because the flow of the river is too strong to safely hold the event. This means that all seven heads which should have been held this year have been cancelled.

 Meanwhile, Rowing Ireland has announced that it will limit access to the National Rowing Centre to high the Olympic training squad, coaches and “essential staff”.

 Rowing Ireland says that no one outside this group will be granted access until April 5th, when the decision will be reviewed.

 Development camps, trials for under-23 and juniors and club and schools activities will not be allowed.

   

Published in Rowing

Rowing clubs along the Shannon have been badly affected by high water levels. Carrick on Shannon and Athlone have both been hit, while Castleconnell is flooded. This came despite pumping. The gym equipment had been moved out and the boats are stored higher up the bank.

This ESB at Ardnacrusha stated: “Due to heavy rainfall in the catchment we will be increasing discharge from Parteen Weir. You are being notified that water is about to be discharged above 325 m3/sec. This will result in flooding of roads, land and may affect property. You are advised to be aware of increased flows in the river as a result of this water discharge. Further increases in discharge may be required. Approx. 400 m3/sec will be discharged.”

Published in Rowing

#Floods - Fears that the Shannon and other rivers have no more capacity to absorb floodwaters are on the increase, as State agencies fighting the tides met in Dublin yesterday.

According to The Irish Times, the National Emergency Co-ordination Group was warned that with more heavy rain due over the next few days, Ireland's rivers have literally reached breaking point as waterlogged lands drain into our inland waterways.

But Environment Minister Phil Hogan said the present situation did not constitute a national emergency, in spite of some of the worst flooding ever experienced in Limerick and Cork over recent days.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in News Update
Tagged under

#Rowing: The Head of the Shannon, set for this Saturday, has fallen to the bad weather. The event, organised by Carrick-on-Shannon Rowing Club, cannot be held because the river is in flood. The weather forecast is for more high winds.

Irish rowing has had no on-the-water competitive events this year so far, as the St Michael’s, Kerry and Sligo heads have already been cancelled, though St Michael’s say they hope to stage their event on February 22nd.

The Dublin Metropolitan Regatta will now take place on May 17th, moving from its slot in June to fill the space left by the cancelled Queen’s University Regatta.

Published in Rowing

About the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race is undoubtedly one of the greatest ocean adventures on the planet, also regarded as one of its toughest endurance challenges. Taking almost a year to complete, it consists of eleven teams competing against each other on the world’s largest matched fleet of 70-foot ocean racing yachts.

The Clipper Race was established in 1996 by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first person to sail solo, non-stop, around the world in 1968-69. His aim was to allow anyone, regardless of previous sailing experience, the chance to embrace the thrill of ocean racing; it is the only event of its kind for amateur sailors. Around 40 per cent of crew are novices and have never sailed before starting a comprehensive training programme ahead of their adventure.

This unique challenge brings together everyone from chief executives to train drivers, nurses and firefighters, farmers, airline pilots and students, from age 18 upwards, to take on Mother Nature’s toughest and most remote conditions. There is no upper age limit, the oldest competitor to date is 76.

Now in its twelfth edition, the Clipper 2019-20 Race started from London, UK, on 02 September 2019.