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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

Baltimore RNLI launched yesterday afternoon (Wednesday 17 July) to rescue a windsurfer who got into difficulty in Baltimore Harbour in West Cork.

The inshore lifeboat launched at 2.01pm after a member of the public alerted the Irish Coast Guard that a windsurfer was being blown against the shoreline at Reengarogy.

With four volunteer crew aboard — helm Kieran Collins and crew members Micheal Cottrell, David Ryan and Ian Lynch — the lifeboat arrived on scene two minutes later to find the casualty in the water, swimming hard to keep clear of the rocks.

The casualty was brought aboard the lifeboat, along with his board, and once satisfied that he was unharmed, the crew took him back to the beach in Baltimore he had originally set out from.

While the inshore lifeboat crew were dealing with their casualty on the shoreline, instructors from Baltimore Sailing Club went to the assistance of another windsurfer who was in difficulty in the middle of the harbour and brought them safely to shore.

Weather conditions at the time of the call were blustery with a south-westerly Force 5 wind and sloppy sea.

Speaking following the callout, Baltimore lifeboat press officer Kate Callanan said: “This was a particularly fast response as the inshore lifeboat was on scene with the casualty within seven minutes of the lifeboat pagers going off.

“Thankfully a member of the public had spotted the danger that the windsurfer was in and did the correct thing in alerting the coastguard.

“If you see anyone that you think is in difficulty on the water or along the coast, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A man found clinging to his capsized boat off Dalkey yesterday afternoon (Monday 15 July) was rescued by Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI lifeboat.

The volunteer lifeboat crew were requested by the Irish Coast Guard to launch their inshore lifeboat at 3.52pm following a report that a boat had capsized and a man was in the sea off Dalkey.

Several members of the public had reported seeing the man in difficulty and raised the alarm.

The lifeboat launched immediately and on arrival at the scene observed that a local fisherman was assisting the casualty by keeping him afloat from his 5.5m boat with the aid of a boat hook.

The crew proceeded to take the man out of the water and assess his condition before administering casualty care.

The coastguard helicopter Rescue 116 from Dublin was also tasked and met the lifeboat crew at Coliemore Harbour in Dalkey, where the man was given more casualty care.

A local doctor was also present at the scene and assisted the casualty until the ambulance arrived minutes later. He was subsequently transferred to St Vincent’s Hospital for further treatment.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI helm Gary Hayes said: “This was a tremendous effort from all involved. We would like to extend our praise to the members of the public who alerted the emergency services as quickly as they did.

“We also want to thank the local fisherman for his help in this rescue and for his efforts to saving a life.”

Locals and visitors will have a change to celebrate the lifesaving work of Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI volunteers at the lifeboat station’s open day from 1pm this Sunday 21 July.

The station at Carlisle Pier will host tours of the all-weather lifeboat Anna Livia, while the inshore lifeboat Realt Na Mara will be on display at the old boathouse beside Rogan’s Slipway on the East Pier.

Souvenirs in support of the charitable work of the RNLI will be on sale in the station shop throughout the afternoon.

And special guests will be visiting the RNLI station during the afternoon, including Stormy Sam and the Dalkey Ukulele Klub.

Stephen Wynne, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: “We are delighted to welcome everyone to inspect the lifeboats and meet the volunteer crew members and get an insight to what they do!”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

At 9 pm on Sunday, Valentia Coast Guard requested Lough Derg RNLI to go to the assistance of six people, four adults and two young children, on a 35ft cruiser aground inside the Mountaineer buoy at Ryan’s Point, on the eastern shore of Lough Derg.

At 9.17pm the lifeboat launched with helm Eleanor Hooker, Dom Sharkey, Joe O’Donoghue and Chris Parker on board. The wind was easterly, Force 2 with good visibility.

Once the lifeboat rounded the Mountaineer Buoy, a lifeboat crew took soundings from the bow, whilst another checked depths on the navigation charts.

When the lifeboat came alongside, the crew established that all people on board the casualty vessel were safe and unharmed and wearing their lifejackets. Two RNLI volunteers were transferred to the cruiser and, once satisfied that the vessel was not holed, set up for a tow.

The lifeboat took the vessel off the rocks and out into safe water, where an RNLI volunteer ensured that the drives, steering and rudder were in good working order. Once the cruiser was safely underway and making way to their next harbour, the lifeboat returned to Station.

Peter Kennedy, Deputy Launching Authority at Lough Derg RNLI advises boat users ‘to plan your passage and pay close attention to the navigational buoys that mark safe water on the lake’.

The lifeboat was ready for service again at 10.12pm

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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GAA presenter and commentator Marty Morrissey and hurling legend Anthony Daly joined the lifeboat crew from Kilrush RNLI and young players from Co Clare to raise awareness of the risks of drowning and encourage people to enjoy the water safely.

Ireland’s ‘Respect the Water’ campaign is part of a joint-partnership between the RNLI and the GAA, and involves RNLI volunteer ambassadors visiting GAA clubs around the country to give water safety advice to young people and to raise awareness of the risks of drowning.

Thirty-seven RNLI volunteers have delivered over 100 talks as part of the partnership, with more due to take place during the summer months.

To promote this year’s campaign, Marty Morrissey and Anthony Daly joined young players from Killimer GAA, Kilrush Shamrocks, Kilrush Ladies Football Club, Kilkee Football Club, Kilkee Bealaha GAA, West Clare Gaels and O’Currys GAA.

Both men had very personal reasons for backing the partnership and becoming ambassadors for it.

I am from a fishing village so well aware of the dangers of the sea

Marty Morrissey’s home place is in the picturesque fishing village of Quilty in West Clare on the Wild Atlantic Way, where the sea has always been part of everybody’s life.

As a result, Marty loves the water but is also aware of its dangers and although he attempted to learn how to swim as a child, he never quite got over his fear.

This was re-enforced in recent months when he was filming a survival sequence in the recent TV hit Marty and Bernard’s Big Adventure when they had to enter a lake and that old fear returned. He has promised himself to learn how to swim when this season’s GAA Championship is over.

Speaking at the launch, he said: “When I was young boy growing up in Quilty, my bedroom literally looked out onto the Atlantic Ocean. I remember that every 13 seconds the light from the lighthouse on the Aran Islands shone in my window.

“I would paddle in the water and some of my friends would jump into the water back at the pier in Seafield, but I wouldn’t, I had the fear. I want to get over that and I’ve set myself the challenge to learn properly.

“It is so important because after all, we all live on the island of Ireland and water plays such an important part of our lives. I am from a fishing village so well aware of the dangers of the sea.”

Speaking on the importance of the partnership, he continued: “I think the RNLI and the GAA are interlinked in many ways. They are both about community. I love the water and I respect it. If we can get more people enjoying it safely and raising awareness so that no family have to go through the pain of losing a loved one, then I see that as a win.

“We’ve had too many tragedies in this country. I’m looking forward to the day that I can go for swim and enjoy the water.”

I think there is an awareness of water safety, but we can never stop banging the drum

Anthony Daly has a very personal reason for wanting to promote the partnership. He lost a good friend, Michael ‘Fondi’ Scanlan, to drowning many years ago.

Fondi was a long-standing kit man at his beloved Clarecastle GAA club and drowned while out fishing. Speaking about the tragedy, Anthony said: “Everyone knew and loved Fondi. He was from a big family where I grew up. He was a great GAA man and came from a strong fishing background.

“When word came to the village that Fondi was lost, there was a rush to the quay to help. We spent the week walking the banks and we wouldn’t go to training while the search was ongoing.

“He was found the following Sunday at the River Fergus and while it was a blessing for the family, his loss has been deeply felt by everyone who knew him.”

Anthony swims in the sea every week and has made sure his daughters can swim. Commenting on the campaign, he said: “The RNLI is a great organisation for the GAA to be involved with in local communities. I think there is an awareness of water safety, but we can never stop banging the drum.

“I love the water and I want my daughters to love the water, too, and not fear it. Anything we can do to raise awareness of the risks of drowning and to share water safety advice, can only be a good thing.”

The key message of the RNLI’s ‘Respect the Water’ campaign is to Float To Live if you find yourself in trouble in cold water:

  • Fight your instinct to swim hard or thrash about – this can lead to breathing in water and drowning
  • Instead, relax and float on your back, until you have regained control of your breathing
  • The recommended floating position is to lean back in the water and keep your nose and mouth clear and extend your arms and legs
  • If you find it difficult to float then make gentle motions such as sculling with your hands and feet and concentrate on bringing your breathing under control

The RNLI will be present at Croke Park on Sunday 28 July to promote the Respect the Water campaign during the All-Ireland hurling semi-final and to share water safety advice with the thousands of fans travelling to see the match.

Volunteers from RNLI lifeboat stations around Ireland will be on the pitch at half time to share the Float To Live message. The campaign is running throughout the summer with advertising across cinema, outdoor posters, radio, online, and catch-up TV channels.

For more advice on how to float and other water safety advice visit RespectTheWater.com

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI helped rescue a woman and two children yesterday afternoon (Wednesday 10 July) after they were stranded on Shenick Island having been cut off by the rising tide.

Shortly after 3pm, the Irish Coast Guard tasked the north Co Dublin lifeboat station to investigate reports of a person waving for help on Shenick Island off Skerries.

The volunteer crew launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson and rounded the headland at Red Island before proceeding to Shenick, where they found that lifeguards from the South Beach had reached the island in their dinghy and were checking on the woman and children’s wellbeing.

The three had walked to the island and had been cut off by the rising tide. They mentioned that they were beginning to feel cold so the crew transferred them to the lifeboat and returned to the station to warm up before a volunteer crew member drove them home.

Speaking about the callout, volunteer press officer Gerry Canning said: “It can be tempting to walk out to Shenick Island when the tide is low enough. However, the window for the tide is quite short and the island is bigger than it looks.

“We’d remind anyone walking along the coast to check the tide times and be aware of the risk of getting cut off. Always tell someone where you are going and ensure you have a means of contacting the shore.”

Published in Rescue
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The volunteers of Clifden RNLI lifeboat launched twice yesterday on what was a busy day for the crew.

​At approximately 1.28pm Clifden’s All Weather Lifeboat Fisherman’s Friend was tasked to assist with a medical evacuation from Inishbofin Island. The Lifeboat set off under command of Coxswain David Barry with Mechanic Andrew Bell, Navigator Alan Pryce and crew Chris Nee and Alvin Bell. The Coastguard Helicopter R118 airlifted the casualty to Castlebar hospital and the lifeboat wasn’t eventually required for the medivac but was available if required as ever.

Not long after one launch came another. This time, the Coast Guard requested the call out to reports of two persons potentially cut off by the tide on Arduilleanisland in Mannin Bay, approximately four nautical miles south of Clifden.

Clifden Lifeboat Operations Manager John Brittaintasked the station’s Atlantic 85 to respond. The quick response from the Atlantic 85 had the crew on scene within 10 minutes, where they quickly established that this had been a false alarm with good intent. The persons on the island were safe and well and had a boat to return ashore after their trip. Assisting at the station for both launches were Neil Gallery, Kenny Flaherty, Ian Shanahan and James Mullen.

​Speaking after the second launch, volunteer Coxswain and Helm Alan Pryce said ‘The dedication and selflessness of the crew is really evident during the busy summer period where the crew literally drop everything to respond to the call, to launch the lifeboats and to assist as best they can.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Following a number of tragic deaths during the past week in the waters around the UK and Ireland, the RNLI is urging people to take extra care if they are heading to the coast or inland waterways this weekend.

As the hot weather continues, risks like cold water shock can put even strong swimmers in danger.

Last weekend saw a number of people lose their lives as they enjoyed the warm weather around the coast and at inland waterways — including a 14-year-old girl who got into difficulty swimming off a Co Louth beach.

In total, RNLI lifeboat crew volunteers were called out to 149 incidents in one of the hottest weekends so far this year.

RNLI beach lifeguards were also busy during the hot weather, patrolling 243 beaches around the UK.

The charity, which relies on public donations, is encouraging anyone visiting the coast to head to a lifeguarded beach and to swim between the red and yellow flags, which is the area most closely monitored by the lifeguards.

Lifeguarded beaches provide much greater safety for general beach users, swimmers and water sports enthusiasts.

Around 150 people die in UK and Irish waters each year, and over half never even planned to enter the water.

Sudden immersion in cold water – especially at this time of year when air temperatures are warm but water temperatures are still very cold – can result in cold water shock, which can be fatal.

RNLI lifeboat crew volunteers were called out to 149 incidents in one of the hottest weekends so far this year

Respect the Water is the RNLI’s drowning prevention campaign. It highlights the risks, advises how to avoid danger and increases the chances of survival in an emergency situation.

RNLI community safety manager Ross Macleod said: “Cold water shock is a very real and present risk for people trying to cool off in open water at the moment, and relevant both around the coast and for inland lakes, reservoirs and rivers.

“Cold water shock is a reaction that, when entering cold water suddenly, can cause someone to uncontrollably gasp and breathe in water. This is particularly dangerous at the moment because water temperatures are still very cold at around 12C, despite air temperatures being much warmer.

“If you plan to go into the water, enter slowly to let your body acclimatise rather than jumping straight in as this will reduce the severity of your cold shock response. If you are taking part in water sports, wearing a wetsuit will also help and, no matter what you are doing, always carry a means of calling for help.

“If you find yourself in trouble in cold water, your natural reaction can be to panic and thrash around, which increases the chances of breathing in water and drowning.

“The best thing to do in this situation is to float on your back and wait for the effects of cold water shock to pass, keeping your airway clear until you can control your breathing. You can then plan your next move to reach safety.

“If you see someone in difficulty, don’t enter the water yourself as you could end up in trouble. Dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Donaghadee RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew put to sea on Wednesday night (3 July) to rescue three adults and two children who had become stranded on the Copeland Islands following problems with their jetski.

The group had gone to the Co Down islands while the sun was still out but were stranded in the early evening when their jetski began to have mechanical issues.

They used a mobile phone to try and contact both Donaghadee and Bangor lifeboat stations before contacting a crew member on their mobile phone.

Paged at 7pm, the volunteers and made good speed in calm conditions in the RNLI Trent class lifeboat Saxon to Chapel Bay on the Big Copeland Island.

The lifeboat’s smaller XP boat, an inflatable tender carried by Saxon, was launched to go to the shore and bring the casualties to the warmth and safety of the larger lifeboat.

A towline was secured by the volunteer crew and the lifeboat returned to Donaghadee Harbour where the casualties were passed to the care of the coastguard.

Speaking following the callout, Donaghadee RNLI coxswain Philip McNamara said: “I feel we got to the casualties just on time, they were starting to feel the cold after spending quite sometime in the sunshine. They didn’t have any water to hydrate or clothing to keep them warm.”

In other news, Donaghadee’s crew joined tributes to an American couple with strong Northern Ireland roots for a generous $74,000 donation which will help the RNLI to continue saving lives at sea.

The late John Bradley, who grew up and worked in Co Tyrone, and his wife Sally Sue, who he met as a pen pal, donated $37,000 each to Bangor and Donaghadee lifeboat stations, while Tower Lifeboat Station, based next to Waterloo bridge in East London received $5,000.

John, who died on 1 July aged 81, leaves a lasting legacy to the RNLI, with the Bradleys’ donation to be used for vital volunteer crew kit and training.

Peter Irwin, Donaghadee RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: “We are so grateful and would like to sincerely thank Sally Sue and John, and remember John for his amazing support of the RNLI. We are saddened to hear of John’s death and extend our sympathies to Sally Sue and the Bradley family.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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If Kinsale Port wasn't treated to enough on Saturday with the climax of the 95-boat Sovereign's Cup Regatta at Kinsale Yacht Club, the West Cork Town also had a visit from the Celtic Steam Engine Association writes Bob Bateman. It evoked great memories of times past with the smell from the smoke and coal and the noise and steam from the whistles from the parade of over a dozen engines big and small through the town.

With names such as 'Leanb', 'Diane', 'Patricia' and 'Scrumpy' the preserved steam engines were participating in a three-day West Cork road run in aid of the RNLI that started on Friday, June 27 at Jacob's Bar in Baltimore.

Passing through Leap, Roscarbery and Clonakilty and Baillinspittle, the run tooted their whistles as they came past Kinsale Yacht Club at prizegiving time before finishing at the Spaniard Pub at 5 pm on Saturday to great applause.

 

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Kinsale RNLI lifeboatThe local Kinsale RNLI lifeboat 'Miss Sally Anne (Baggy)' that bears the sign on her stern: "Never Fear Baggy’s Here" Photo: Bob Bateman

Published in Sovereign's Cup
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A man was taken to hospital with hand injuries by Irish Coast Guard helicopter after a Mayday call on a yacht off Kilmore Quay on Saturday (29 June).

The local RNLI lifeboat crew were en route to another vessel that had requested a tow when the call came in from a 12m yacht some 13 miles south-west of the Co Wexford village.

It was reported that as the yacht’s crew were adjusting a sail, a piece of rigging had parted and seriously injured the skipper’s hand.

The lifeboat arrived just after the Waterford-based coastguard helicopter Rescue 117, whose crew determined the best course of action was to transfer the casualty to the lifeboat for pain relief.

He was subsequently winched to the helicopter and flown to Waterford University Hospital for further treatment.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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