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Displaying items by tag: 1720

This weekend's 1720 National Championships are to be downgraded to a Munster Championships in the wake of the recent government announcements that appeal to Dubliners not to travel outside the county.

As Afloat reported previously, the Championships had already moved from its original venue at Baltimore in West Cork over COVID and now the event will no longer be a 'nationals'. 

The event due to be held now at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in Cork Harbour will be amended to a two-day format on Saturday 26th & Sun 27th September.

Robert O'Leary has taken victories in August's 1720 Baltimore Cup and more recently in this month's Southern Championships, so if he and his Baltimore Crew can pull off another win, it looks like they will be unique among Ireland's one-design classes by being crowned 'Southern' and 'Munster' champions in the same season!

There is a plan for the 1720 class to say in Cork Harbour after the weekend and continue to race at Royal Cork Yacht Club's AIB Autumn League, as Afloat reported earlier here.

Published in 1720
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Robert O'Leary will be going for a hat-trick of 2020 1720 sportsboats victories later this month but not as originally scheduled, as the 1720 National Championships moves venue from Baltimore Sailing Club in West Cork to Monkstown Bay Sailing Club in Cork Harbour

O'Leary won the 2020 Baltimore Cup a month ago and in the last weekend of August he won the Southern Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club, so he and his Dutch Gold crew will quite rightly see the defence of the 1720 title as a crowning glory of the 2020 season.

However, he won't have it all his own way with a potent Ross McDonald crew of Howth biting at his heels. McDonald lost on countback at the Cup and was tied on points overnight after day one of the Southerns. 

In a notice to competitors issued this month, Baltimore's Committee told competitors that 'after reviewing the current government guidelines and seeking guidance from the local businesses in Baltimore, we as a committee feel that we cannot provide the same level of racing and entertainment as experienced in the Baltimore Cup this year'.

1720s return to Cork Harbour on September 25th 1720s return to Cork Harbour on September 25th Photo: Bob Bateman

The West Cork club hopes to welcome the fleet back to Baltimore in 2021.

After discussions with Monkstown Bay Sailing Club, the 1720s have agreed to run the event in Cork Harbour on the same dates - 25th, 26th, 27th September 2020.

It will be a combined effort between the two clubs as both are of the opinion that the event should not be cancelled this year provided it can run it in line with the Covid-19 government guidelines.

It is the intention to launch, berth and recover boats in the Crosshaven River, with the primary race area being South East of the Harbour.

Published in 1720
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Robert O'Leary's Dutch Gold Baltimore Sailing Club crew add the AIB Southern Championship title to their 1720 sportsboat trophy haul after an emphatic six-point win at Cork Harbour today. 

O'Leary counted a tally of eight results inside the top four to win the Royal Cork Yacht Club hosted event. The Cork ace had one poor result scored in race eight today where he finished 12th, a result that he later discarded.

The winds for the 14-boat championships came in like a lion for the opening races on Friday with some big breeze but then went out like a lamb as forecast today with the final two races sailed in light airs. O'Leary however, managed to prove himself across the wind range by making a strong recovery in today's final race nine to win it, his fourth race win of the weekend.

Second overall was Royal Cork's T-Bone (Durcan/O'Shea). Third was the Royal Cork and Howth Yacht Club entry Ropedock/Atara (Ross McDonald/English) who held second place throughout the championships until a disqualification from the final race.

1720 Southern Championships Results Overall1720 Southern Championships Results Overall

1720 Southern Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club Day Three Slideshow

Published in 1720

The overnight AIB 1720 Southern championships leader Robert O'Leary has built a five-point winning margin after five more races were sailed today at the Royal Cork Yacht Club hosted event. 

The Baltimore Sailing Club crew sailing 'Dutch Gold' are putting in a consistent performance, similar to that of three weeks ago at the 1720 Baltimore Cup which they won on countback against O'Leary's father, Anthony. 

Tight racing for Southern Championships honours in the 14 boat 1720 sportsboat fleetTight racing for Southern Championships honours in the 14 boat 1720 sportsboat fleet Photo: Bob Bateman

Dutch Gold has not been outside the top four in any of the seven races sailed so far this weekend. Today, the West Cork sailing team earned four top three results (and two wins) from five races sailed in the 14-boat fleet.

Conditions were not as windy as Day One but there were still some big gusts. Photo: Bob BatemanConditions were not as windy as Day One but there were still some big gusts. Photo: Bob Bateman

Staying second overall, Howth Yacht Club's Ross McDonald in Ropedock -Atara trails by five points and is a similar margin ahead of third-placed T-Bone (Tom Durcan/).

Racing continues tomorrow and the forecast is for lighter winds.

1720 Southern Championships Overall after Seven Races Sailed

1720 southern championships results

1720 Southern Championships Photo Gallery Day Two By Bob Bateman 

Published in 1720

It's very tight at the top of the 14-boat fleet after a breezy first day of the AIB 1720 Southern Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club yesterday.

Two races were sailed outside Cork Harbour to the South West of Roches Point in 15 - 28 knots of wind under Race Officer Ciaran MacSweeney with Interantional Race Officer Jack Roy also on board the Committee Boat.

Race One was sailed on small sails to ease the fleet into it and Rope Dock Atara had a storming victory.

Overall leaders - Rob O'Leary and his crew in Dutch Gold from Baltimore Sailing Club lead but are tied on three points with Ropedock AtaraOverall leaders - Rob O'Leary and his crew in Dutch Gold from Baltimore Sailing Club lead but are tied on three points with Ropedock Atara Photo: Deirdre Horgan

Race Two saw the Q flag lowered, a strengthening tide and an unexpected increase in the breeze. With big sails on it was a monster of a race and with all bar one boat falling over, there was plenty of action.

Ropedock Atara (Ross McDonald/English) Photo: Deirdre HorganRopedock Atara (Ross McDonald/English) Photo: Deirdre Horgan 

This time Robert O'Leary and crew took a convincing first with Atara second and they now share the points lead with a one, two each but with O'Leary winning the final race of the day he sits on top of the scoresheet under the tie-break rule.

T-Bone (Durcan/O'Shea) from RCYCT-Bone (Durcan/O'Shea) from RCYC

An early start this morning at 10:25 will see up to four races for the fleet.

A start at the 1720 AIB sponsored Southern Championships off Cork HarbourA start at the 1720 AIB sponsored Southern Championships Photo: Deirdre Horgan 

Results are here

1720 Southern Championships Day One Photo Gallery below

Published in 1720

Congratulations to all the North Sails Ireland customers for their great results in the recently held 1720 Baltimore Cup in West Cork.

First overall was Robert O'Leary flying North 3Di Mainsail and Large Jib.

Second overall was Anthony O'Leary flying the same combination of North 3Di sails.

Second overall was Anthony O'Leary flying the same combination of North 3Di sailsSecond overall was Anthony O'Leary Photo: Deirdre Horgan

The Durcan Family sailing Team T-Bone was 4th overall Flying 2017 3DL upwind sails and excelling downwind with the latest T-6 spinnaker design.

1720 T-Bone1720 T-Bone Photo: Deirdre Horgan

T-Bone was the only boat to win two races........Great to see this class enjoying such close racing in the beautiful waters of Baltimore.

Back in April 2019, I wrote a piece called "The Trickledown effect" this piece talks about how 3Di started life in the America's Cup and is now on the smallest One Design boats including the 1720. Well worth a read......

Also whilst we are on the subject of 3Di take a look here to understand exactly how it's made. Totally unique in the sailmaking world, when you watch this video it will go some way to explaining why a 3Di sail might cost a little more than a conventional 2D sail.

We look forward to the next 1720 regatta at the end of August as part of the Cork 300 celebrations.

Sail FAST!

Published in North Sails Ireland
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The 12-boat 1720 Baltimore Cup was won by Rob O’Leary's Dutch Gold and his crew winning on countback as he was on joint nett points with Finaleg helmed by Anthony O’Leary over a six race series. In third place was Baltimore local boat – Spiced Beef skippered by Fionn Lyden.  Full results are here.

Meanwhile, entries are building nicely for the AIB 1720 Southern Championships that will be sailed as part of the Royal Cork Tricentenary At Home Regatta later this month. So far there are nine 1720s entered with a plan to hit 20.

The 12-boat 1720 sportsboat fleet racing downwind at Baltimore, West CorkThe 12-boat 1720 sportsboat fleet racing downwind at Baltimore, West Cork Photo: BSC/Facebook

Published in 1720
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Olympic helmsman, professional sailor and coach Mark Mansfield takes a look at how it may be possible to return to keelboat racing while maintaining social distance onboard.

The latest Government five-phase programme appears to allow the reinstatement of boating and sailing from May the 18th, under certain restrictions.

The RNLI and Coastguard will likewise need to lift their advisory notice as well for this to happen.

Irish Sailing is liaising with the yacht clubs in Ireland and the Government to get clarity on specific aspects of this five-phase plan. In the interim, commencing racing appears to be positioned in Phase 3, which would begin on June the 29th but many sailors are asking; how can this happen under the requirement to also socially distance ourselves from others?

3 mark mansfield3Article author Mark Mansfield sailed the Star keelboat for Ireland at four Olympic Regattas between 1996 and 2004. He is a multi-class Irish keelboat champion

Other sports are also in the same situation with resumption to training planning on commencing in Phase 2 in early June and some matches in Phase 3. Team sports like soccer, Gaelic, hockey, basketball and others have further complications in that they compete directly against opposition at close quarters.

Luckily in sailing, though we are a team sport, our opposition usually is quite a bit away from us. It is therefore in our own hands how, on boats, we can keep our distance when racing. The following are my thoughts on how this can happen successfully, keeping our sport going in these difficult times.

Dinghies that rely on rescue boats when capsized, and two-person dinghies and smaller keelboats will have additional challenges. However, for the purposes of this article, I will concentrate on larger keelboats that have engines to allow them to look after themselves in the event of an emergency.

Raptor 0293Class One boats approach a leeward mark on Dublin Bay in 2019 Photo: Afloat

Fully crewed or shorthanded?

Though there are other options around bubbles, family crew and the like, clearly it will be challenging to sail fully crewed for the first couple of months and still keep the required space between each other. The sight of 8 bodies huddled together on the rail while going upwind on a 35-foot cruiser-racer would not only be regarded as unsafe but irresponsible and would send all the wrong messages.

So, at what crewing levels could racing happen and still keep close to the permitted social distancing levels?

It is possible to specify a max crew level for different sized boats.

Different sized boats have different crewing needs. An SB20 sportsboat, for example, does not need the same crew numbers as a 42-footer. So what crew numbers would be required on different sized boats. Here is my estimate:

  • Up to 26 footers 3 max per boat – Only 2 allowed to sit over the side
  • Over 26 foot and up to 31 foot – Max of 4 crew – only 2 allowed to sit over the side
  • Over 31 foot and up to 36 foot – Max 5 crew – only 2 allowed to sit over the side
  • Over 36 foot and up to 41 foot – Max 6 crew – only 3 allowed to sit over the side
  • Over 41 foot and up to 46 foot – Max 7 crew and only 4 allowed to sit over the side

And so on in 5-foot sized increases.

An amendment to The Notice of Race (NOR) could be inserted for events to make these reduced numbers a requirement, while we still have these restrictions due to COVID 19.

Is this enough crew to race boats with spinnakers?

In the Fastnet Race in 2019, There were 65 entries in the Two-handed class, ranging from 45 footers, down to 30 footers. Most boats were in the 35-foot size range and used spinnakers. Yes they all would have autopilots, and that effectively gives you an extra pair of hands doing sail changes, but that still would mean that they would have had two less crew than my crew size thoughts above.

SB20 1285An SB20 racing under spinnaker in strong breeze with a crew of four on Dublin Bay Photo: Afloat

SB20

Certain classes, such as the SB20, would still find it challenging to keep a distance with 3 on board, and having spoken to the class, they could see a possibility, if required, to sail with just 2 crew, particularly in light winds. In stronger winds, they may wish to just sail without spinnakers.

1720 2065A 1720 keelboat with a crew of five in Dun Laoghaire Harbour Photo: Afloat

1720

The 1720 class has also looked at this, and Class Captain Clive O'Shea told Afloat: "If required, the 1720 class is ideally situated to reduce numbers to allow social distancing while racing. Three crew can keep apart, and we still have the option to go with small spinnakers and small jibs, if needed."

So how would this happen on a typical small cruiser, like a J24 or a medium-sized cruiser-racer like a J109?

J24 racingA J24 in racing mode Photo: Afloat

J24

Three crew could handle a J24; One is helming and trimming the main, one in the cockpit, and one on the bow. The Bowman stays forward of the shrouds; the cockpit person stays away from the helm, up by the hatch. It won't be all that easy, but 30-foot boats like Etchells have similar-sized sails and normally sail with 3.

unnamed 4A fully crewed J109 on Dublin Bay (above) and a two-handed crew on the same model (below)

J109 short handed 

J109

Five on a J109; One on the wheel, staying back a bit. One in the cockpit is trimming the mainsheet but sitting well forward. Helm adjusts the traveller or leaves it in the centre. One sits in the hatch, or on top of the coachroof. The Jib Trimmer sits out, and during tacks, they pull in the new sheet while the Mainsheet Trimmer has let off the old jib sheet. The Bow person sits out forward of the shrouds; jib trimmer sits out to windward, 2 metres back from the Bowman. Downwind more room becomes available as both sides of the boat can accommodate the crew. Andrew Craig, Class Captain of the J109 class in Ireland, says, 'the J109 is well suited to shorthanded racing with the small jib and plenty of space for a reduced number to spread out. The Asymmetrical Spinnaker requires no pole which also makes shorthanded use possible in the right conditions'

White Sails & other options

For those with boats that are harder to sail, or if a crew is not that experienced, there is also the white sails (non-spinnaker) fleet to compete in, until fully crewed racing resumes.

Dublin Bay Sailing Club is the largest yacht racing club in the country with over 250 boats in 20 or so classes. Its Commodore, Johnathon Nicholson has this to add; "Along with the other clubs, DBSC is working with Irish Sailing to create a clear and safe path to get back on the water. We are currently investigating the practicalities of racing short haded with the appropriate physical distancing and when it could be introduced following the guidance provided by the government, Sport Ireland and Irish Sailing".

I appreciate there may be occasions during racing that crew get closer than planned for short periods. This is to be expected, but that will be the situation in virtually all sports that will likely be competing over the next few months. It is incumbent in our sport to come up with a plan to compete as safely as possible. This is just one option, and there will likely be others. Of course, this COVID-19 restriction could be tightened or eased during the next few months, and this proposed plan would then need to be looked at again. Reducing racing crew numbers also decreases the numbers that come back into the clubs allowing easier social distancing ashore.

Ultimately, however, as all sailors know, it is up to each individual skipper and crew to make their own decision about whether to go to sea or not.

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Extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures. The 1720 class has followed the lead of some other sailing classes and taken the plunge into the world of virtual racing writes Robbie English.

The Rope Dock 1720 VR April League started three weeks ago and has received 40 entrants. Given that each race on the Virtual Regatta platform is limited to 20 entrants, two fleets have been created to accommodate the large number of competitors. Each fleet is randomly selected each week and adds an extra dimension to the racing. The boats used for racing are changed each week also, to keep it interesting and everyone on their toes.

1720 racing 1A large fleet makes for a crowded racecourse and some close racing

With such a large fleet, the race course has become a congested place! However, this has made for some tight racing as it can be hard to pull away from such a large pack. Results can vary wildly, and has made for an incredibly close leader board. After three weeks of racing, the lead at the top of the board change hands three times. Our current leader is Daniel Raymond, who has found a consistent form that has taken to the top on 63 points. He is followed closely by Darragh McCormack in second on 67 points and Killian Collins in third on 73 points. However, a 10-point lead can we whittled away very quickly!

1720 VRClose racing makes for a jam-packed mark rounding. Here we see a typical leeward gate approach!

So, it’s all to play for heading into the final week of racing, which will be on Tuesday night at 20:00. A thank you must go out to our league sponsor, Rope Dock, who have very generously supplied us with the prizes for the league. Who exactly is going to get them, is yet to be determined. Results can be downloaded below.

Published in 1720
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Baltimore Sailing Club will be hoping for the same conditions that graced last year's West Cork race track when the 1720 sportsboat fleet returns for its National Championships from 25 – 27 September 2020.

As Afloat reported last September, a buoyant 20-boat fleet contested the championship in 2019 won by the host club's Robert O'Leary with six top-five results from eight sailed including three race wins.

A Notice of Race – will be published in due course.

Published in 1720
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Coronavirus (COVID-19): Irish Sailing & Boating

Since restrictions began in March 2020, the Government is preparing for a 'controlled and gradual return to sport' and the 2020 sailing fixtures are being tentatively redrafted by yacht clubs, rowing clubs angling and diving clubs across Ireland as the country enters a new phase in dealing with the Coronavirus. The hope is that a COVID-19 restrictions might be eased by May 5th as Sport Ireland has asked national governing bodies for information on the challenges they face. 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) information

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It's caused by a virus called coronavirus.

To help stop the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) everyone has been asked to stay at home. But some people may need to do more than this.

You may need to either:

You do these things to stop other people from getting coronavirus.

Read advice for people in at-risk groups

Read advice about cocooning.

Restricted movements

Everybody in Ireland has been asked to stay at home. You should only go out for a few reasons, such as shopping for food.

But you need to restrict your movements further if you: 

  • live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, but you feel well
  • are a close contact of a confirmed case of coronavirus
  • have returned to Ireland from another country

You need to restrict your movements for at least 14 days.

But if the person you live with has had a test and it is negative, you don't need to wait 14 days. You should still follow the advice for everyone - stay at home as much as possible.

Close contact

This is only a guide but close contact can mean:

  • spending more than 15 minutes of face-to-face contact within 2 metres of an infected person
  • living in the same house or shared accommodation as an infected person

How to restrict your movements 

Follow the advice for everybody - stay at home.

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