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9th February 2024

Port of Cork CEO to Leave

The Chief Executive of Cork Port is leaving after four years in the post.

Eoin McGettigan announced his intention to step down from his role in May today.

“This is not a decision I’ve taken lightly as it has been an honour to lead the Port of Cork through such a transformative period for the company. The Port has celebrated many significant milestones over the last four years. The opening of a €94m new terminal in Ringaskiddy, the moving of 70% of the Port’s activities from Cork City to the deeper waters of the lower harbour, as well as the launch of the Port Masterplan 2050 which sets out the Port’s exciting ambitions for the future. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time with the Port of Cork and working with the excellent team here, but I feel the time is right for me to focus on further professional goals I hope to achieve.

Michael Walsh, Chairman of the Port of Cork, said the CEO’s “careful stewardship,” had achieved a great deal.

“We wish him well in his future endeavours. Our focus remains on continuing to further strengthen and evolve our business and looking ahead to an exciting transformative period for Port of Cork.”

Published in Port of Cork
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The Port of Cork Company has issued a warning to all mooring holders in Cork Harbour that it is going to remove all unauthorised, unpaid or poorly marked moorings in Cork Harbour.

“It is the responsibility of the mooring holder to ensure that their mooring is in the correct position and is clearly marked at all times with the correct mooring number,” the Port Company says. “We hereby give notice that it is the intention of the Port of Cork Company to remove all unauthorised, unpaid or poorly marked moorings over the coming months, from the week commencing 26th of February.”

It has “suspended” the issuing of mooring positions for applications received after 10th of January, “until these works have been completed” and says it will resume “issuing mooring positions on 1st April 2024.”

Published in Port of Cork

Supporting the accelerated growth of the fixed offshore renewable energy (ORE) sector is a key component of the Port of Cork Masterplan 2050, which was launched on Friday (19 May) by Transport Minister Eamon Ryan and Finance Minister Michael McGrath.

The Port of Cork Company Masterplan (read the executive summary HERE) outlines its plans and ambitions over the next three decades and provides an integrated framework for the port to strategically plan and adapt to meet the needs of Ireland’s future social, economic and environmental development.

It includes plans to support the green energy sector and a roadmap outlining the port’s ‘River to Sea’ journey, consolidating all activities in the lower harbour by 2050.

Minister Ryan, who is also Minister for Environment, Climate and Communications, said: “I am delighted to be on site today to be guided through the Masterplan and to see first-hand the world-class facilities that are already in place at the Port of Cork.

“Cork Harbour is one of the largest natural harbours in the world. It has been a working port for centuries and is one of Ireland’s major employment hubs. The Port of Cork Masterplan offers a strategic blueprint towards the future, with the facilitation of fixed Offshore Renewable Energy as a central part of the plan, with full planning permission already in place to provide essential onshore infrastructure resources.

“I also welcome the port's ambitions to achieve a 51% reduction in overall greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, reaching NetZero emissions by 2050, in accordance with the government’s Climate Action Plan 2023. This new plan is definitely charting a course to a new sustainable and secure future for the port.”

Eoin McGettigan, chief executive officer at the Port of Cork Company said: “Historically, the Port of Cork has been an energy hub for the region by facilitating the import of fuels such as coal, oil, timber and land-based wind turbines.

“As we make the necessary move away from fossil fuel consumption, the Port of Cork will continue to play a key role in facilitating the future energy needs of the country as a hub for renewable fuels, transition fuels and offshore energy streams.“”

McGettigan added: “The Port of Cork is a commercial port and to ensure its ongoing competitiveness, we must adapt to the rapidly changing customer expectations which are pressuring the shipping industry to deliver goods in a faster, more flexible, and sustainable manner at low delivery cost. To do this, we must provide our customers with reliable, safe, high-performing facilities and services, and be an efficient link in the logistics chain.

“Despite this commercial ambition, we are extremely aware of our heritage and the role we play in our local community. As we endeavour to meet changing demands, the well-being of the people of Cork and its environment will continue to be embedded in our values, and be reflected in every decision we make.”

Published in Port of Cork

The ESB and the Port of Cork Company have signed a memorandum of understanding regarding joint plans for Ireland’s offshore wind and green hydrogen development, as the Irish Examiner reports.

A key factor of Port of Cork’s masterplan is aiming to position the city and its natural, deep-channel harbour at the forefront of Ireland’s growing offshore renewable energy sector.

And with the ESB’s Net Zero by 2040 seeing collaboration as critical to the development of green energy in Ireland, the partnership comes at an opportune time.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Power From the Sea

The Port of Cork Company (PoCC) looks forward to welcoming the return of cruise ships this spring in Cork Harbour as it announces its Cruise Liner Schedule for 2023. Anticipating a strong year, PoCC sees bookings return to pre-pandemic levels, with 113 vessels expected in 2023, compared to 100 vessels in 2019.

The first cruise liner of the season, ‘The Ambience’, will dock in Cobh on Monday, 10th April.

Speaking about the 2023 Cruise Schedule, Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer at the Port of Cork Company stated, “Last year, we were delighted to welcome over 115,000 passengers on 90 cruise ships to Cork following a two-year pause as a result of the pandemic. Now, we look forward to what is expected to be a thriving year in the cruise liner industry, as bookings return to pre-pandemic levels, which will have a really positive impact on the local region’s tourism and trade. All of us here at the Port of Cork look forward to welcoming the cruise liners, passengers and crew in the coming months.”

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer at the Port of CorkConor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer at the Port of Cork

Johanna Murphy, President of Cobh and Harbour Chamber said: “We’re looking forward to once again welcoming cruise passengers and crew back to Cobh. The cruise season is always a huge lift for everyone in Cobh and the local harbour community, so we look forward to what is anticipated to be a busy year of cruise liners which will boost local trade in the town.”

Johanna Murphy, President of Cobh and Harbour ChamberJohanna Murphy, President of Cobh and Harbour Chamber

The Ambience cruise ship is due to dock quayside in Cobh Cruise Terminal at 12:00pm and is scheduled to depart at 19:00pm on April 10th 2023.

Published in Port of Cork
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Cork Port Company has formally opened its €89m deepwater container terminal at Ringaskiddy with an announcement that it is formulating a development plan for the harbour up to 2050.

The new terminal is described as "the largest single investment in marine infrastructure of any Irish port over the last 100 years." It has been operational since April, providing multimodal berths in the world, 13-metres in depth and 360 metres in length.

The Port Company says: "When fully operational, on completion of the M28 road network" it will have the capacity to handle 330,000 TEUs. . This road is the subject of protests and concerns from local residents but has Government approval.

At today's official launch Minister Hildegarde Naughton with special responsibility for transport and logistics, said that "Maritime transport accounts for more than 90% of Ireland's international trade, and the Port of Cork has played an integral role in keeping Ireland connected, as part of the global transport system."Cork and Dublin are the only ports in Ireland capable of servicing all six shipping modes – lift-on/lift-off, roll-on/roll-off, liquid bulk, dry bulk, break bulk and cruise.' 

Cork Port Company Chairperson, Michael Walsh, said the container port is only the first phase of an overall proposed development plan for the Port of Cork:

"This is the beginning of an exciting new chapter at Port of Cork as we seek to meet the next phase of needs of our community and customers. As we look forward towards a Vision for 2050, we see huge potential for our harbour to continue its role as a focal point for our community to live in and enjoy, as well as a key gateway for global.

"We would like everyone’s help in developing a new Masterplan to 2050, which will act as a blueprint for the future growth and development of the Port of Cork. I encourage our local community, customers and national stakeholders to share their ideas when we launch a consultation on our draft plan in the coming weeks.” 

The Ringaskiddy development went ahead only after intense local opposition. 

Details of a "blueprint for the growth to 2050" are to be delivered "in the months ahead, following public consultation," according to the Port Company.

Eoin McGettigan, Port CEO, PoCC, said: “It is really important to us that we work with our colleagues, neighbours and customers in the local area to make sure that the development of the Port of Cork is something that everyone is proud of."

Published in Port of Cork
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A memorandum of understanding has been signed today between Ireland’s first green hydrogen company, EIH2, the Port of Cork and the Port of Amsterdam.

This partnership will enable Ireland to maximise its use of offshore wind as a source of energy, by providing an alternative route to market for such renewable electricity. Earlier this year, the Irish Government identified an additional 2GW of offshore wind to be used for green hydrogen production, and this partnership provides the route to market that is needed for Ireland to become a net exporter of energy over time.

This partnership will help to enable the establishment of a supply chain for green hydrogen between Ireland and Europe via the port of Amsterdam.

This partnership agreement reflects the high level of collaboration between Ireland and The Netherlands and the European approach of working together to become the first Net Zero continent. The event forms part of a major offshore wind mission organised by the Netherlands Embassy in Ireland from 11th to 14th September and held in Cork. The purpose of the mission is to increase collaboration on the energy transition between Ireland and The Netherlands at a national level and business to business.

The event will bring together key stakeholders from the wind sector in Ireland and The Netherlands including supply chain, developers, academics, utilities, policy writers and policy influencers.

The signing ceremony of the Memorandum of Understanding was attended by the Dutch Minister for Climate and Energy Policy, Mr. Rob Jetten, and the Irish Minister of State for Public Procurement, eGovernment and Circular Economy, Mr. Ossian Smyth, as official witnesses to the agreement. Also represented were Lord Mayor Cork City, Cllr Deirdre Forde and Deputy Lord Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Anthony Barry.

Pearse Flynn, EIH2’s founder said: “Our goal at EIH2 is to help both Ireland and Europe achieve their ambitious energy targets. The recent RePowerEU plan quadruples the role for Green Hydrogen in Europe. This was reflected in Ireland’s recent carbon budgets, with an additional 2GW of offshore wind planned specifically for green hydrogen production. This partnership is the beginning of a supply chain for green hydrogen from Ireland where there is a lot of wind but not a lot of hydrogen demand to Europe where the situation is reversed.”

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer of the Port of Cork Company said: “At the Port of Cork Company, we see significant opportunities for Cork Harbour to become a hub for renewable energy, which will benefit the environment, local businesses and create employment in the region. We hope to utilise our facilities at this strategic location, working together with like-minded partners to support the development of renewable energy opportunities.”

Ireland and the Netherlands have traditionally enjoyed strong and historic trade relations and both countries have placed strategic priority on the development of production capacity and international distribution of green hydrogen.

Gert-Jan Nieuwenhuizen, Director Business Development Cargo of Port of Amsterdam said: “Port of Amsterdam is very pleased with the signing of this MoU with such valuable partners. It underlines both the strong ties between Ireland and our port and the increasing importance of green hydrogen. For Port of Amsterdam, priorities are to make green hydrogen available to the large industrial clusters in the greater Amsterdam area, as well as to serve as a gateway to the European hinterland, including regions with high potential demand in Germany. The developments in the south of Ireland and the technical proficiency of Irish parties, mean the country will be well positioned for the future export of this new energy source. The port of Amsterdam will offer a route to market for Irish green hydrogen, both in our port itself, and in the rest of Europe.”

Published in Port of Cork
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Crowds lined the Riverside from Monkstown to Cobh in Cork Harbour this afternoon as the Big Lift Baffin left Cork Dockyard with three heavy lift cranes aboard bound for New York.

Two Cork Port tugs assisted the ship leaving the Dockyard. It went astern out to the centre of Monkstown Bay and was then turned bow on to leave the harbour down past Cobh, Whitegate and Roche"s Point for the ten-day voyage to the US.

Big Lift heading for sea and New YorkBig Lift heading for sea and New York

For more read Afloat's earlier report on the Big Lift Baffin here

Crowds watching Big Lift Baffin depart Cork DockyardCrowds watching Big Lift Baffin depart Cork Dockyard

Bob Bateman's Big Lift Photo Gallery Below

Published in Port of Cork

The largest single objects ever engineered in Ireland, to be shipped out of the country, have been loaded aboard The Big Lift Baffin at Cork Dockyard in Cork Harbour.

These are three ship-to-shore container cranes built by the Liebherr factory in Killarney, destined for the Maher Terminals at the Port of New York and New Jersey, on the east coast of the United States. These are amongst the world's largest shipping terminals.

The three cranes were designed and manufactured in Liebherr's facility in Killarney, which specialises in cranes for shipping terminals and port operations. The various parts of the crane were manufactured in Killarney and shipped to Cork, either by road, or by sea from Fenit Harbour. They were then assembled in DSG's 44-acre Cork Dockyard terminal, the former Verolme Cork Dockyard. 

Cork's Doyle Shipping Group (DSG) is handling transport operations, including commissioning the Big Lift Baffin, On arrival in the US, the ship will anchor off Sandy Hook, where preparations for passing under Bayonne Bridge, which connects New York to New Jersey will be made.

The Big Lift Baffin will take ten days for the voyage to the US.

"These cranes are the largest single objects ever engineered in Ireland to be shipped out of the country. Months of planning have gone into the process with extensive coordination between DSG, Liebherr and the Port of Cork. It highlights the capability and suitability of Cork Harbour for such operations. There is no air draft, so there are no wires or bridges to impede transport. Once they leave the terminal here, there is direct access to the open Atlantic," said Eoin O'Sullivan, director with DSG.

Published in Port of Cork
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19th August 2022

Cork Port Marks 250 Years

The 250-year history of Cork Port underscores the importance of the maritime sphere of the maritime sphere's importance to the region, its Chief Executive told a National Heritage Week event in the Crawford Art Gallery in the city, which was the site of the original Custom House on Leeside.

The Port gifted its collection of maritime paintings and artefacts, worth an estimated €1m.to the Gallery last year after it sold its city centre offices and moved to Ringaskiddy deepwater centre in the lower harbour.

The collection, on exhibition until August 28, comprises 17 paintings dating back to the 1800s by several renowned artists, such as Cobh-born marine painter George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson. The collection includes a Ship's Register from Cork Harbour Commissioners dating back to 1912, referencing both the Titanic and Lusitania, an illuminated address to Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-1891), and a silver Admiralty Oar from 1686.

A painting by George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson of a Barque Glenlara off Cork Harbour c.1865 from the Crawford Art Gallery Cork Collection A painting by George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson of a Barque Glenlara off Cork Harbour c.1865 from the Crawford Art Gallery Cork Collection

"As a company, we are very proud of our heritage, which spans over 250 years. These unique maritime artworks by renowned artists, offer a fascinating insight into the operations of Cork Harbour at that time and underscore the Port's long-standing international significance for commerce and trade, "said Port Chief Executive Eoin McGettigan. "Not only does the collection signify the history of our great Port and harbour, but it also showcases how far the Port has come regarding leisure, operations, scale and trade. We are delighted this collection has found such a welcoming home at The Crawford Art Gallery."

The original gallery building, dating from 1714, was Cork's Custom House.

"This special collection of unique maritime artworks has been one of our most popular exhibitions," said the Director of the Crawford Art Gallery, Mary McCarthy.

"It acts as a visual reminder of this building's connection with Cork's Maritime past as well as showcasing the strong heritage of this great port, city and county."

Published in Port of Cork
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Coronavirus (COVID-19): Irish Sailing & Boating

Since restrictions began in March 2020, the Government is preparing for a 'controlled and gradual return to sport' and the 2020 sailing fixtures are being tentatively redrafted by yacht clubs, rowing clubs angling and diving clubs across Ireland as the country enters a new phase in dealing with the Coronavirus. The hope is that a COVID-19 restrictions might be eased by May 5th as Sport Ireland has asked national governing bodies for information on the challenges they face. 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) information

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It's caused by a virus called coronavirus.

To help stop the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) everyone has been asked to stay at home. But some people may need to do more than this.

You may need to either:

You do these things to stop other people from getting coronavirus.

Read advice for people in at-risk groups

Read advice about cocooning.

Restricted movements

Everybody in Ireland has been asked to stay at home. You should only go out for a few reasons, such as shopping for food.

But you need to restrict your movements further if you: 

  • live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, but you feel well
  • are a close contact of a confirmed case of coronavirus
  • have returned to Ireland from another country

You need to restrict your movements for at least 14 days.

But if the person you live with has had a test and it is negative, you don't need to wait 14 days. You should still follow the advice for everyone - stay at home as much as possible.

Close contact

This is only a guide but close contact can mean:

  • spending more than 15 minutes of face-to-face contact within 2 metres of an infected person
  • living in the same house or shared accommodation as an infected person

How to restrict your movements 

Follow the advice for everybody - stay at home.