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Likening proposals for moving Dublin Port out of the capital to changes at other European ports is “misleading” and “not an apples-to-apples comparison”, argues Trinity urbanism professor Philip Lawton.

Writing in the Business Post, Prof Lawton notes how the “pet notion” of relocating the city’s port function, whether north via plans for Bremore Port or south to Arklow, to free up prime land for redevelopment ignores vital differences between Dublin and other European cities like Copenhagen and Oslo.

“Rarely has a port become fully detached from its original location, which is what’s being suggested for Dublin,” he says, detailing that when it has happened, it’s involved the expansion of existing port infrastructure — a vital aspect missing in Dublin’s case.

Ports, he adds, “do not exist in isolation. They are not vacant lots awaiting redevelopment, but part of a wider urban system. We may not feel it on a daily basis, but they are a fully integrated part of the city.”

The Business Post has more of Prof Lawton’s analysis HERE.

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Dublin Port Company (DPC) has today announced that it has granted a new operating licence to CMA CGM Inland Services (CCIS), a subsidiary of CMA CGM Group, to begin operating at Dublin Inland Port. CCIS is one of the world’s largest providers of inland services with a container depot network in over 30 countries worldwide.

From this month, CCIS will become the second company to move its container operations to DPC’s North Dublin logistics hub, following an €8 million investment by DPC on a second phase of the development. It brings to €56m DPC’s total investment in Dublin Inland Port, all self-financed.

With their newly acquired licence, CCIS is now set to expand its portfolio, which already boasts over 23 dedicated empty container depots across Europe. Their state-of-the-art Dublin facility will specialise in container storage and repair, focusing on catering to the export needs of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and refrigerated products. Together with service partner Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), the investment will create 25 new jobs.

Headquartered in Marseille, France, the CMA CGM Group is a global player in sea, land, air and logistics solutions, with a workforce of over 155,000 employees worldwide. Operating a fleet of more than 620 ships calling in over 420 ports across a comprehensive global network, the group has been a significant player in the Irish market since 2006.

This is the second licence awarded at Dublin Inland Port at the North Dublin logistics hub after Dublin Ferryport Terminals (DFT) were granted permission by DPC to operate in October 2021.

Doyle Shipping Group is an Irish family-owned shipping business founded in 1882. They employ over 700 people throughout Ireland, handling over 13 million tons of cargo and providing port service solutions throughput all major ports in Ireland, as well as other services through their Logistics and Renewables divisions. Now steered by the third generation of the Doyle family and a committed board of directors, the Group aims to continue to invest in infrastructure and skills, with an emphasis on Health and Safety, and growth that is underpinned by long-term thinking.

The ongoing development of Dublin Inland Port continues DPC’s delivery of its Masterplan commitment to maximising the use of existing port lands by relocating port-related, but non-core activities – including empty container storage – away from Dublin Port.

Dublin Inland Port is located 14 kilometres from Dublin Port off the M2, with direct access to the M50 and to Dublin Port via the Dublin Port Tunnel and is part of Dublin Port’s world class route-to-market infrastructure.

Cormac Kennedy, Head of Commercial at Dublin Port, said: “In the past 12 months, we’ve invested a further €8million developing the next phase of Dublin Inland Port, which has created the opportunity for CCIS to relocate and grow its business in Ireland further. We are also delighted to see that this will create 25 new jobs. We are delighted to welcome CCIS and to support their business at the facility this December.

“As part of our Masterplan, we made a strategic decision to relocate non-core port users away from the Dublin Port estate. While this has freed up valuable space that is now being used for core activities, we are still running at close to capacity.

“By strategically relocating non-core users, we have successfully freed up 75% of our masterplan 40-hectare target, allowing Irish exporters and importers to benefit from the much-needed additional space within the Dublin Port footprint. Overall, since it opened in 2021, Dublin Inland Port has resulted in more efficient use of the Dublin Port Tunnel and Dublin Port’s internal network.”

A spokesperson for the CMA CGM Group said: “We are delighted It is a great opportunity to have been granted an operating license by Dublin Port Company for Dublin Inland Port. This marks the first expansion of CMA CGM Inland Services (CCIS) into Ireland and aligns seamlessly with our commitment to delivering top-tier logistics solutions.

“With our extensive portfolio, including over 23 dedicated container depots across Europe, this newly acquired license allows us to specialise in container storage and repair. At the state-of-the-art Dublin facility, CCIS will also specialise in the provision of refrigerated containers for frozen foodstuffs and high value pharmaceuticals which are exported worldwide from Ireland. Focused on catering to the export needs of key sectors such as foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, beverages and refrigerated products, we are eager to contribute to the growth and efficiency of Dublin Inland Port.”

Max Doyle, Director, Doyle Shipping Group Dublin, added: “This is an exciting development for the region. Doyle Shipping Group are pleased to be partners in this project, which should go some way to further easing the burden on quayside terminals as well offering a high-grade option to those looking to manage their empty equipment. DSG has operated in the region for many years and we are delighted to be able to further improve the options for our customers. In partnership with CCIS, we are confident that we can provide a service that will benefit from CCIS expertise in Inland depots and DSG’s operational experience and knowledge of the local market.”

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Dublin Port Company (DPC) has today announced the outcome of the selection process that will see Terminal 5 in Dublin Port licensed to Stena Line and Seatruck Ferries. Stena Line will operate a new Dublin-Birkenhead (Liverpool) service while Seatruck Ferries and parent company CLDN will further develop their Dublin-UK services as part of this new shared freight terminal agreement.

In September 2023 DPC called for proposals from interested ferry lines to service west coast English or Welsh ports (excluding Dublin-Holyhead) out of Dublin following confirmation that P&O (which operated from Terminal 5 in Dublin Port) would exit the Dublin-Liverpool route by year end.

Stena Line’s new freight service between Dublin and Birkenhead (Liverpool) commences mid-February 2024, while Seatruck Ferries will move its Dublin-Heysham freight service within Dublin Port to Terminal 5 in January 2024.

DPC’s decision to award a shared licence to both Stena Line and Seatruck Ferries at Terminal 5 maximises the port’s existing infrastructure by pushing more truck and container freight through the terminal’s footprint. The move further supports DPC’s objective of adding capacity where possible, given the ongoing constraints on port lands, with Dublin Port already running close to capacity.

Barry O’Connell, CEO, Dublin Port Company, said: “It’s essential for Ireland’s economy that we have strong availability and competition on direct shipping routes between Dublin Port and the UK. We are pleased to welcome Stena Line’s new Dublin-Birkenhead route which brings choice to the market, and to continue working with Seatruck Ferries and CLDN on growing its Dublin-Heysham service.”

Stena Line’s new freight service

Stena Line’s new freight service will initially operate with one ship departing Dublin early in the morning and making the return journey from Birkenhead in the evening.

Stena Line already operates from Dublin Port to Holyhead and from Birkenhead to Belfast, and this new service will complement these existing routes. The company is currently assessing ship deployment options ahead of the mid-February start date in Dublin.

Paul Grant, Trade Director (Irish Sea), Stena Line, said: “We are very excited to re-establish this vital trade corridor with our new freight route between Dublin and Birkenhead which will further increase crossing options for our hauliers and their customers. With Stena Line now operating two routes out of both Dublin Port and Birkenhead, we are establishing key logistics hubs connecting freight flows across the Irish Sea and creating efficiencies for port users. We have invested significantly in our Birkenhead operations in recent years and as a result have seen growth on our Belfast to Liverpool service. We are confident that this new service will prove popular, offering more choice for our freight customers on both sides of the Irish Sea.”

Seatruck’s growing freight business

Seatruck Ferries and CLdN have been steadily expanding services into and out of Dublin in recent years. CLdN currently operates direct services from Rotterdam, Zeebrugge and Santander, while Seatruck Ferries operates the Heysham and Liverpool routes. As a result of the licence, Seatruck Ferries will move its Dublin-Heysham service to Terminal 5 in early 2024. All other CLdN services, including the Seatruck Ferries services to and from Liverpool, will continue to operate from Terminal 4. CLdN will also add a vessel to the Dublin-Liverpool route, providing extra sailings on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, bringing the total number of daily departures from three to four in each direction.

Alistair Eagles, Managing Director Seatruck Ferries, said: “We very much welcome this decision by Dublin Port. CLdN and Seatruck’s unaccompanied freight business on the Irish Sea has been growing steadily over recent years and more than 70% of all Irish Sea ferry freight now moves on an unaccompanied basis. The use of both Terminal 4 and Terminal 5 will enable us not only to further increase capacity but also to optimise the efficiency of our operations at the port. We look forward to growing our links with DPC as a stable and reliable partner and to further expanding our offer to customers.”

Published in Dublin Port

Dublin Port Company (DPC) is pleased to unveil a set of bicycle racks that have been recently installed at the Great South Wall to support the growing number of people who are accessing the popular location by bike.

This new facility - ideally located at the start of the Great South Wall - will allow up to 12 bikes to be securely parked before visitors begin their walk towards Poolbeg Lighthouse, one of the most distinctive landmarks in Dublin.

Over 300,000 people walk the Great South Wall annually, and many of these, including a growing number of tourists and locals, as well as swimmers at the Half Moon, are travelling there on two wheels ahead of their journey on foot.

At nearly 5km long, the Great South Wall was the longest seawall in the world when it was completed in 1731. Though a seawall in South Korea has since taken that title, the Great South Wall remains one of the longest in Europe.

These bicycle racks are the latest example of DPC working towards a more cycle-friendly port. In October, DPC received its final grant of planning permission to begin work on the Liffey-Tolka cycle lane. This project will create a new 1.4 km dedicated pedestrian and cycle route that will link the River Liffey with the Tolka Estuary through DPC lands.

Over 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon Swimming Club, many of whom cycle have struggled to find somewhere to lock our bikes at the start of the walkOver 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon Swimming Club, many of whom cycle have struggled to find somewhere to lock their bikes at the start of the walk Photo: Tommy Dickson

Eamon McElroy, Port Engineer at Dublin Port Company, said: “We are pleased to announce the installation of this brand-new set of bicycle racks at the Great South Wall. Dublin Port Company is committed to becoming a more cycle-friendly port and with projects such as our ambitious Liffey-Tolka cycle lane, we are well on the way towards our port-city integration. We get over 300,000 visitors to the Great South Wall annually and we hope that these new bicycle racks will attract even more walkers. DPC would like to thank Dublin Cycling Campaign for their input and advice on this project.”

Christmas at the Great South Wall! Left to right: Zane Blount-Ronan (13), Sabrina Moore of Half Moon Mad Yokes Swimming Groups and David Timoney of the Dublin Cycling Campaign take advantage of the new bike racks at the Great South Wall, which allow walkers a more sustainable point of access to one of the longest sea walls in EuropeChristmas at the Great South Wall! Left to right: Zane Blount-Ronan (13), Sabrina Moore of Half Moon Mad Yokes Swimming Groups and David Timoney of the Dublin Cycling Campaign take advantage of the new bike racks at the Great South Wall, which allow walkers a more sustainable point of access to one of the longest sea walls in Europe Photo: Tommy Dickson

David Timoney, Dublin Cycling Campaign, explained: “Good bicycle parking may be what persuades people to travel by bicycle rather than jumping in the car. We know that the fear of bike theft is a deterrent to more people cycling. We also know that good bike parking plus a high-quality lock stops most bike theft. The installation of these bike racks at the start of the Great South Wall, where there is a high degree of natural surveillance, is exactly what is needed to encourage more people to cycle instead of taking the car.”

Sabrina Moore, Half Moon ‘Mad Yokes’ Swimming Group, added: “We have over 50 regular sea swimmers at Half Moon, many of whom cycle, but up until now we have struggled to find somewhere to lock our bikes at the start of the walk. These bike racks are perfect for us and will encourage those who do drive to leave the car at home, which has the dual benefit of being the healthier choice and helping to reduce our carbon emissions.”

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Dublin Port Company has proudly welcomed ‘Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port’, a compelling exhibition curated by The Little Museum of Dublin, to its Substation for a three-month stay.

The first-ever exhibition at the Substation, Dublin’s latest cultural hub, was launched by the Lord Mayor of Dublin Daithí de Róiste. The showcase - which includes never-before-seen photos - provides a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port.

‘Solidarity’ delves into the rich tapestry of Ireland’s industrial subculture, spotlighting the dockers’ narrative characterised by hardship, camaraderie, and unyielding resilience. From the challenges of casual labour to the advent of containerisation, the exhibition vividly illustrates the evolution of this dynamic community.

Guests take in history at Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port, a new exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin and Dublin Port Company, free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm at The Substation, Dublin Port, until early February. Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin PortGuests take in history at Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port, a new exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin and Dublin Port Company, free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm at The Substation, Dublin Port, until early February. Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port Photo: Tommy Dickson

Lord Mayor Daithí de Róiste commented on the significance of the exhibition, stating: “The dockers of Dublin Port have played a crucial role in shaping the city’s history. ‘Solidarity’ is a tribute to their enduring spirit and a reminder of the sacrifices made by those who toiled on the docks. This exhibition not only preserves their legacy but also invites us to reflect on the vibrant tapestry of Dublin's industrial heritage. I would like to congratulate Dublin Port Company and the Little Museum of Dublin for coming together to put on such a wonderful exhibition.”

Barry O’Connell, CEO of Dublin Port Company, remarked: “We are proud to support this insightful exhibition from the Little Museum of Dublin that brings to life the untold stories of the dockers. ‘Solidarity’ provides a unique perspective on the challenges and triumphs of this remarkable community, highlighting the crucial role they played in the development of Dublin Port. It is a testament to their resilience and the enduring legacy they have left behind.”

Historian in residence at the Little Museum of Dublin Daryl Hendley Rooney (left) with Dublin Port’s Marta López (centre) and the Little Museum’s Dara Flynn at the launch of Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port.Historian in residence at the Little Museum of Dublin Daryl Hendley Rooney (left) with Dublin Port’s Marta López (centre) and the Little Museum’s Dara Flynn at the launch of Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port Photo: Tommy Dickson

‘Solidarity’ invites visitors to explore the profound traditions rooted in family ties that defined the dockers’ lives. Many dockers followed in the footsteps of their families, embracing a life of physically demanding and unpredictable work. The exhibition meticulously examines various facets of the dockers’ lives, including docker’s reads, the button system of preferential hire, the tools of the trade, and the indispensable role of cranes. Additionally, the exhibition delves into the social aspects of a docker’s life, juxtaposed with the daily dangers faced on the docks.

Paddy Daly, retired docker, holding his docker’s shovel, currently on display at The Substation at Dublin Port as part of the Little Museum of Dublin’s exhibition Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port. The exhibition showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port. Solidarity is free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm until early February. No repro fee. Photo: Tommy DicksonPaddy Daly, retired docker, holding his docker’s shovel, currently on display at The Substation at Dublin Port as part of the Little Museum of Dublin’s exhibition Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port. The exhibition showcases never-before-seen photos which provide a poignant glimpse into the lives of the dockers, a vibrant and resilient community integral to the history of Dublin Port. Solidarity is free of charge for all and open every Thursday-Sunday 11:30am-3:30pm until early February. No repro fee. Photo: Tommy Dickson

Free of charge for all, ‘Solidarity: The Dockers of Dublin Port’ is open to the public at The Substation, Alexandra Road, Dublin Port, every Thursday-Sunday, 11:30 am-3:30 pm until early February.

Dr Rhona Mahony, Chair of the Little Museum of Dublin, added: “We were thrilled to work alongside Dublin Port Company to bring this engaging exhibition to the port. Dockers would have gathered in their hundreds next to the Substation every day seeking work on the docks, so there couldn’t be a more appropriate venue. A lot of time and hard work went into this exhibition, and I would like to pay tribute to the Dockers who shared their memories with our curation team, enabling them to create this exhibition.”

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Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Simon Harris TD was at Dublin Port’s Substation today to mark the Dublin Construction Skills and Retrofitting Programme crossing 1,000 graduates.

The Port-based three-week course, which St Andrew’s Resource Centre runs in partnership with Inner City Renewal Group, is focused on helping the unemployed upskill quickly and find gainful employment in the construction industry.

Today saw ten people graduate, bringing the total number of graduates since the course was launched in 2017 to over 1,000.

Construction Skills Course by Numbers:

  • 1,003 people have graduated.
  • 60% of graduates start a job within the first month.
  • Female interest in the course is growing - 10% of graduates in 2023 were women.
  • 90% of candidates complete the three-week course.
  • 102 courses have been completed since 2017.

The intense course, for which all candidates are issued with a full set of workwear, prepares recent graduates with a diverse set of qualifications and experience for employment on construction sites. It consists of two main components: a Construction Skills Certification at Level 3 and a Retrofitting Assistant Certification.

Both components involve a placement process, and they work closely with each individual candidate to facilitate their entry into the construction industry. The primary objective of the programme is to have 60% of participants gain employment in the construction sector, with the majority of them securing jobs within four weeks of completing the course. Notable companies that have hired graduates include John Sisk & Son, Careys Building & Civil Engineering, Walls Construction, Alufix, and Clarke Concrete.

Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Simon Harris TD said: “The Dublin Construction Skills and Retrofitting programme is a shining example of how innovative training initiatives can have a profound impact on individuals’ lives and the local community. With over 1,000 graduates, this course is not just about numbers, it's about creating opportunities, empowering people and driving economic growth. It’s heartening to see the construction industry embracing and benefitting from this skilled workforce. Congratulations to all involved in this remarkable achievement.”

Barry O’Connell, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: “Dublin Port Company are extremely proud to play host to the Construction Skills Course. The Port has long-standing ties with St Andrew’s and we are delighted to facilitate the great work they are doing for the local community and beyond. To pass 1,000 graduates is a phenomenal achievement and a lot of credit must go to all involved.”

The curriculum is tailored to individual needs and capabilities. The range of modules includes:

  • Induction
  • SOLAS Safe Pass
  • Manual Handling
  • Abrasive Wheels
  • MEWP (Scissors and Boom)
  • Working at Heights
  • QQI Level 3 Construction Skills
  • Introduction to Block Laying – 3 days (onsite)
  • Introduction to Plumbing and Plastering – 3 days (onsite)
  • Introduction to Carpentry and Decoration – 3 days (onsite)

The inception of the programme can be traced back to a collaborative effort involving the Department of Social Protection, St. Andrews Resource Centre and Dublin City Council. This initiative arose in response to the need for a local workforce to support the construction of the incinerator site in Ringsend in 2016 and the Strategic Development Zones in Dublin Docklands. St. Andrews Resource Centre devised a strategy to facilitate the recruitment of local workers in the east side of the inner city.

Minister for Further and Higher Education Simon Harris TD alongside Megan Pepper, graduate of the Dublin Port-based Construction Skills course, and Edel Currie (left), Community Engagement Manager at Dublin Port CompanyMinister for Further and Higher Education Simon Harris TD alongside Megan Pepper, graduate of the Dublin Port-based Construction Skills course, and Edel Currie (left), Community Engagement Manager at Dublin Port Company Photo: Conor Healy

Edel Currie, Community Engagement Manager, Dublin Port Company, said: “The course is truly a life-changing experience for some of the graduates. There are amazing stories of people, men and women, from the local community who have flourished in the construction industry off the back of this course. We have even seen some graduates working within the Port, so it gives us immense pride to see the difference it can make to people’s lives.”

Jim Hargis, Manager of the Education and Training Hub at St Andrew's Resource Centre, said: “We are immensely proud to reach 1,000 graduates at Dublin Port’s magnificent Substation today. The success of the project, and something that gives me great satisfaction, is that it is always evolving to ensure it meets employers’ needs. I would like to give a huge thanks to Dublin Port for giving us the platform to stage the course and supporting us.”

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Dublin Port Company (DPC) has announced the opening of T4, a newly redeveloped RoRo freight terminal in the Port costing €127m, which was officially launched on Tuesday, November 07th by the Minister of State, Jack Chambers, TD.

Self-financed by DPC and delivered on time, and on budget, T4 marks a major milestone in the delivery of the ABR Project, the first of three major capital development projects under its Masterplan to futureproof Dublin Port’s cargo handling capacity to 2040.

Maximising existing lands to facilitate international trade

T4 will handle more than 220,000 RoRo units annually, which equates to over one-fifth of all RoRo units at Dublin Port based on 2022 volumes and more RoRo freight per annum than any other port in the Republic of Ireland.

T4’s capacity comes from 4.1ha of existing port lands having been reconfigured, creating more efficient space for handling European and UK unaccompanied RoRo units. It comes into operation at a time of growing demand for unaccompanied RoRo freight services (goods on trailers transported by ferry without a driver) to and from the greater Dublin market post-Brexit.

It has also enabled the opening of a new transhipment route to Santander.

T4, a new €127m freight terminal, at Dublin Port. It marks a major milestone in the delivery of the ABR Project, the first of three major capital development projects under Dublin Port Company’s Masterplan to futureproof Dublin Port’s cargo handling capacity to 2040. The terminal will handle more than 220,000 RoRo units annually, which equates to over one-fifth of all RoRo units at Dublin Port based on 2022 volumes and more RoRo freight per annum than any other port in the Republic of Ireland. Photo: Andrew WatchornT4, a new €127m freight terminal, at Dublin Port. It marks a major milestone in the delivery of the ABR Project, the first of three major capital development projects under Dublin Port Company’s Masterplan to futureproof Dublin Port’s cargo handling capacity to 2040. The terminal will handle more than 220,000 RoRo units annually, which equates to over one-fifth of all RoRo units at Dublin Port based on 2022 volumes and more RoRo freight per annum than any other port in the Republic of Ireland. Photo: Andrew Watchorn

Modern port infrastructure for next-generation ferries

T4 brings into operation 3km of new quay walls, upgrading Victorian-era port infrastructure to service direct routes between Dublin and Liverpool/Heysham by ferry operator Seatruck.

The work also involved the demolition of an old jetty, replaced with two best-in-class modern jetties of 270m each, that will accommodate the largest ferries measuring 240m in length and which have been future-proofed to allow for shore to ship power in the years ahead.

Launching T4, Minister of State, Jack Chambers, TD said; “I am delighted to be on-site today for the opening of T4 and to see first-hand the world-class facilities that are in place at Dublin Port.

“Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest freight and passenger port, handling approximately 51% of national tonnage. Its importance is even more pronounced in the unitised freight sector as it handles 71% of all Load-on/Load-off and 80% of all Roll-on/Roll-off tonnage in and out of the country.

Dublin Port is Ireland’s largest freight and passenger port handling approximately 51% of national tonnageDublin Port is Ireland’s largest freight and passenger port, handling approximately 51% of national tonnage Photo: Afloat

“In line with its Masterplan, Dublin Port has been progressing the necessary infrastructure to provide for increases in throughput. T4 will greatly enhance Roll-on/Roll-off capabilities at the Port.

“As an island nation, sufficient capacity and the efficient and seamless operation of our ports are indispensable for the success of Ireland’s importers and exporters.”

Barry O’Connell, Chief Executive of Dublin Port Company, said; “Dublin is already one of the most efficient ports in Europe. With T4, we are driving even more efficiencies and facilitating growing customer demand for direct shipping routes between Dublin, the UK and Europe. O'Connell also discussed these plans in a recent Afloat podcast with Lorna Siggins here.

“Even with T4 now fully in operation, Dublin is running at 91% average capacity and therefore it is imperative that our plans to complete all three of our Masterplan 2040 projects continue as planned. “This will ensure we create the capacity needed to support the ongoing growth in the economy to 2040, while providing new public amenities that will support the growth of our city and neighbouring community for decades to come.”

Opening up the Port

Significantly the development of T4 has also facilitated the closure of an entrance onto East Wall Road paving the way for DPC’s Liffey Tolka Greenway project on East Wall Road to commence construction in 2024. This will see the transformation of the East Wall Road with a new dedicated 1.4km cycle and pedestrian route which will eventually form part of the 16.5km of cycleway / walkway planned as part of the overall Masterplan.

This is another important step in DPC's journey to open up Dublin Port as a safe and accessible venue for all to enjoy.

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Dublin Port chief executive Barry O’Connell had previously worked in eight different countries for Coca-Cola before he took up his new post a year ago this November.

The port has been investing in community projects, including the refurbished substation on East Wall Road, funding a new boat for Stella Maris, and some 16km of walkways and cycleways – it has just secured planning permission for the Liffey-Tolka section.

Dublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell alongside Alicia Weafer, Trudi Pepper, Emma Gannon and Niamh Kane of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team, who take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company. The boat is named after the original St Laurence, which was built, owned and competed in by Dublin Port workers in the 1950sDublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell alongside Alicia Weafer, Trudi Pepper, Emma Gannon and Niamh Kane of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team, who take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company. The boat is named after the original St Laurence, which was built, owned and competed in by Dublin Port workers in the 1950s Photo: Tommy Dickson

Is all this activity genuine engagement or simply an effort to win public support for its 3FM master plan, which is due to be submitted for planning approval?

And what about the latest call by economist David McWilliams in The Irish Times for the port to move?

Listen to O’Connell's response in an interview for Wavelengths below

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As part of the third annual Irish Port Safety Week, Dublin Port Company welcomed over 100 children from St Patrick’s Girls’ National School, Ringsend, and St. Joseph’s Co-ed Primary School, East Wall, to the Pumphouse for a Colouring Competition Award Ceremony.

The children coloured in pictures relating to port safety, including spot-the-difference drawings of health and safety examples from within Dublin Port. Goodie bags were handed out and there were numerous prizes awarded to children from both primary schools for their brilliant colouring skills.

There was a Q&A session with a member of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI), who also demonstrated how to put on and inflate a lifejacket, which is vital for safety near the water.

Paul Hogan, Assistant Harbour Master at Dublin Port Company (right) and a volunteer from RNLI (left), host kids from St. Joseph's Co-Ed School, East Wall and St. Patrick's Girls National School, Ringsend at Dublin Port for a safety demonstration and colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo credit: Andrew WatchornPaul Hogan, Assistant Harbour Master at Dublin Port Company (right) and RNLI volunteer George Duffy (left), host kids from St. Joseph's Co-Ed School, East Wall and St. Patrick's Girls National School, Ringsend at Dublin Port for a safety demonstration and colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo Andrew Watchorn

The colouring competition, sponsored by Pollution and Waste Services Limited, was one of several events taking place during Irish Port Safety Week at Dublin Port. Port Safety Week allows the Port Authorities of Ireland to work collaboratively through the Irish Port Safety Forum to highlight a collective awareness of and responsibility for health and safety. Other events included staged water and land-based emergency scenarios, a demonstration by a state-of-the-art tug master vehicle and the RSA Shuttle Bus was also on site for two days.

Alecia Iyoko Rosy Mbayo, age 6, of 1st Class, St. Patrick’s Girls National School, Ringsend, gets creative for Dublin Port Company’s colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo credit: Andrew WatchornAlecia Iyoko Rosy Mbayo, age 6, of 1st Class, St. Patrick’s Girls National School, Ringsend, gets creative for Dublin Port Company’s colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo: Andrew Watchorn

Edel Currie, Community Engagement Manager for Dublin Port, said: “We were thrilled to host St Patrick’s Girls’ School and St Joseph’s Co-ed Primary School at Dublin Port’s Pumphouse. Both Schools entered our Port Safety Week colouring competition, so it was fantastic to get all the kids in to see their efforts on the wall.

Girls from St. Patrick’s Girls National School, Ringsend, get creative for Dublin Port Company’s colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo credit: Andrew WatchornGirls from St. Patrick’s Girls National School, Ringsend, get creative for Dublin Port Company’s colouring competition as part of Port Safety Week 2023. Dublin Port Company is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services for a bumper calendar of events across the week. Photo: Andrew Watchorn

“Dublin Port have a longstanding relationship with the local primary schools. A lot of the children’s families have historically worked in the port, and we feel that it is important to keep that connection alive today. Whenever appropriate we always try to include the local primary schools. We see our close connections with the local schools as a key part of our port-city integration.”

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Dublin Port Company (DPC) proudly kicked off the third annual Irish Port Safety Week at its Substation today. DPC has joined the other Port Authorities of Ireland to host and promote the initiative, which runs from October 23rd to 27th.

Port Safety Week allows the Port Authorities of Ireland to work collaboratively through the Irish Port Safety Forum to highlight a collective awareness of and responsibility for health and safety. A calendar of events throughout the week allows port users to enhance their safety knowledge at Dublin Port.

The Road Safety Authority Shuttle Bus will be at Dublin Port on Tuesday and Wednesday. The Shuttle Bus is a highly popular tool that brings road safety education to life in an engaging, interactive and memorable way. Members of the public, as well as port workers, can test and improve their skills in simulated adverse driving conditions. This continued focus on road safety follows on from Dublin Port’s SafePort initiative, which last year reduced speed limits across the seven unitised terminals from 40 km/h to 20 km/h to highlight the importance of road safety in and around the busy port.

Other highlights throughout the week include:

  • 150 children from local schools take part in a colouring competition at Dublin Port’s Heritage Zone.
  • Doyle Shipping Group’s state-of-the-art tug master vehicle will offer demonstrations for port operators to see the future of freight.
  • Take a break and focus on mental health with free lunchtime yoga sessions.
  • Witness a staged emergency scenario as the Irish Coastguard calls in DPC’s pilot and tug boats for a water rescue at the Poolbeg Yacht Club.

The dates for Irish Port Safety Week were chosen to follow European Safety Week. All ports nationally have been invited to participate in the national safety week with different collaborative events taking place at each port daily.

The themes of the Irish Port Safety Week include the Awareness of Port Golden Rules, Class 3 PPE, Emergency Response, Traffic Management, Employee Wellness, Water Safety and Safe and Healthy Work in the Digital Age, which is the overall theme of European Safety Week.

Following the formation of Dublin SafePort in 2022, Dublin Port - Ireland’s largest port - have taken giants strides to enhance safety. They recently introduced their ’10 Golden Rules’ to follow on from several measures including changing the speed limits throughout its north port road network from 50km/h to 40km/h.

Dublin Port is delighted to have the assistance and support of the Road Safety Authority, An Garda Síochána, Dublin Fire Brigade, the Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and other services who interact frequently across the port area.

Dublin Fire Brigade are onsite at Dublin Port Friday, October 27th as part of an emergency scenario at the R&H Hall on the Port estate. In collaboration with Dublin Port Company and the staff at the R&H Hall, Dublin Fire Brigade responds to an onsite explosion with two missing persons reported. This scenario showcases the highest standards in health and safety practice that are central to all Dublin Port.

Michael McKenna, Dublin Port Harbourmaster, said: “We are very proud to see the bumper calendar of events at Dublin Port and throughout the ports of Ireland for Port Safety Week. Thanks to the support of our great partners, which include the HSA, Dublin Fire Brigade, the RSA and an Garda Síochána, the entire community of workers at Dublin Port can partake in a range of vital events to raise awareness of Health and Safety around the Port. Attendees of our many events will come away with a reinforced awareness of the SafePort Golden Rules, key emergency response strategies and the wider role everyone has to play in maintaining a safe and welcoming work environment at the Port.”

Assistant Chief Fire Officer Michael O’Reilly, Dublin Fire Brigade, said “Collaboration is at the heart of everything we do with Dublin Port. As you can see from the numerous safety exercises and events held at the Port throughout Irish Port Safety Week, Dublin Fire Brigade stands committed to working closely with Dublin Port to enhance safety standards and promote a secure environment for everyone involved.”

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Esailing & Virtual Sailing information

The concept of e-sailing, or virtual sailing, is based on a computer game sailing challenge that has been around for more than a decade.

The research and development of software over this time means its popularity has taken off to the extent that it has now become a part of the sailing seascape and now allows people to take an 'active part' in some of the most famous regattas across the world such as the Vendée Globe, Route du Rhum, Sydney Hobart, Volvo Ocean Race, America’s Cup and some Olympic venues too, all from the comfort of their armchair.

The most popular model is the 'eSailing World Championship'. It is an annual esports competition, first held in 2018 and officially recognised by World Sailing, the sports governing body.

The eSailing World Championship is a yearly competition for virtual sailors competing on the Virtual Regatta Inshore game.

The contract to run the event was given to a private company, Virtual Regatta that had amassed tens of thousands of sailors playing offshore sailing routing game following major offshore races in real-time.

In April 2020, the company says on its website that it has 35,000 active players and 500,000 regattas sailed.

Virtual Regatta started in 2010 as a small team of passionate designers, engineers, and entrepreneurs gathered around the idea that virtual sailing sports games can mix with real races and real skippers.