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Displaying items by tag: Brexitberths

#cruiseliners - The arrival of thousands of well-travelled North American visitors on a huge cruiseship today could signal the ‘‘end of an era’’ due to actions of the Dublin Port Company, that's according to a group of businesses from across the tourism, retail and transport sectors.

The All-Ireland Cruise Ship Action Group (AICSAG) which was formed to campaign against the ban on cruiseships entering Dublin Port from 2021 has welcomed the influx of visitors due to the arrival of cruiseship Celebrity Reflection in the port today. (Afloat adds even larger capacity cruiseships have docked in the port previously). 

Celebrity Reflection which holds 3,600 high-spending passengers from North America, is in Dublin for a ‘turnaround’, an industry term used when one group of passengers leave a cruise ship after a cruise and fly out of Ireland while another group of passengers jet into Dublin to join for a new cruise. Many of these high net worth individuals continue to spend time on the island of Ireland after their cruise ends.

According to AICSAG, turnarounds are believed to be worth up to €100 million to the Irish tourism industry but have now been banned by the Dublin Port Company.

Up until recently, the Dublin Port Company have been extremely active in promoting cruise tourism and were actively marketing to international cruise lines, such as Celebrity.

The decision by the Dublin Port Company to stop cruise ships docking at Dublin Port from 2021 was according to the Group taken without any consultations or engagement with the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, local businesses, Dublin City Council, or the other Irish ports, namely Belfast, Waterford and Cork, who will be severely impacted by this decision.

Cruise companies market Ireland as a destination, and in addition to Dublin large cruise ships often stop off at Belfast, Waterford and Cork. Without access to Dublin Port, cruise companies will no longer stop in other Irish ports and will take hundreds of thousands of passengers out of Ireland to other European destinations.

Afloat.ie today contacted Dublin Port Company which issued the following statement in response to AICSAG.

The berth restrictions we are introducing in 2021 are intended to last three years (i.e. from 2021 to 2023) while we undertake major construction works on a 400 metre quay wall, Alexandra Quay West. (Afloat adds this quay forms part of Alexandra Basin). 

As regards the long-term, we have planning permission to develop new berths suitable for cruise ships immediately east of the Tom Clark Bridge [East-Link] at an estimated cost of €100m. This is the subject of a cost benefit analysis study which is currently underway and which will be finished by mid-year.

We intend publishing this study as part of a public consultation process (including with the cruise industry) to ensure that a €100m investment by Dublin Port would be viable. Subject to the outcome of this process, the new berths would be constructed in 2024 / 2025 and be available in 2026.

In addition to the statement, DPC has supplied Afloat.ie with a Briefing Document for the Minister for Transport Shane Ross on Dublin Port’s new cruise ship berthing and pricing policy.

The detailed document published in March, covers many aspects including the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project (ABR) and as alluded above new cruise berths [at the North Wall Extension] available in 2026.

Published in Cruise Liners

Fastnet Yacht Race 

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge. For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between. The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish is in Plymouth, Devon via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Plymouth.
  • The lighthouse first shone its light on New Year’s Day in 1854
    Fastnet Rock originally had six keepers (now unmanned), with four on the rock at a time with the other two on leave. Each man did four weeks on, two weeks off

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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