Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Coastguard

Following a report of a flare tonight, an extensive search of an area west of Cork Harbour was conducted but nothing was found and the search was called off. Emergency services had received reports of a red flare seen at Rocky Bay, west of Cork Harbour.  RNLI lifeboats from Kinsale, Crosshaven and Ballycotton and the Waterford based Coastguard helicopter, Rescue 117, were launched to investigate the sightings.  

Published in Coastguard

At 12.00 noon yesterday Holyhead Coastguard on the Irish Sea received a 999 call from an Aberffraw resident reporting that a woman had come to her house and asked that the Coastguard be alerted to a person in difficulty off Traeth Mawr. The person’s craft had capsized but no further information was forthcoming.


Whilst still gathering initial information, Trearddur Bay RNLI Lifeboat, RAF Rescue Helicopter 122 and Rhosneigr Coastguard Rescue Team were sent to the scene.

Shortly afterwards the helicopter reported that they were recovering a person from the water who they would be taking to Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor.


It seems that the 33 year old man had been in a kayak which had capsized off Traeth Mawr.  Due to the strong ebb flow from Aberffraw Estuary he could not reach the shore safely. The helicopter crew advised that there was no evidence that the man had been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.


Jim Paton, Holyhead Rescue Coordination Centre Manager says:


“Sadly, the kayaker was later confirmed as deceased.  We would recommend that anyone undertaking these kinds of activities wears a buoyancy aid"

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

A man has been rescued from the River Tweed after falling from a ladder whilst boarding his angling boat. Lynda Bell, watch officer at Humber Coastguard says:


 We received a 999 call at 11.40 this morning reporting that the man had fallen in the water and asking for assistance. The caller had heard the man shouting for help and we could still hear him shouting for help in the background as the 999 call was made.


 “We requested the Berwick RNLI inshore lifeboat to launch and it was soon on scene picking the man up from the water.


"The 69 year old, who is from the Berwick area, was wearing a lifejacket so this meant that we were able to recover him from the water very quickly.  He also did exactly the right thing by shouting for help as soon as he entered the water. After a quick check over by ambulance paramedics he was allowed home.


“This incident shows just how crucial a lifejacket can be.  It can mean the difference between a swift and simple rescue or a protracted search with a possible fatal outcome.  Please remember to wear your lifejacket.  It’s useless unless worn.”

Published in Rescue
Page 52 of 52

RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

Fastnet Race 2021 Date

The 2021 Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Sunday 8th August 2021.

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating