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Displaying items by tag: Detained cargoship

#Detained - A Dutch flagged general cargoship that was due to Dublin Port last night remains under detention in Wicklow Port having discharged packaged timber, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Irish maritime authorities detained the 2010 built Crown Mary on behalf of the Paris MoU in which Ireland is a member of the organisation. The mission of the Paris MoU is to eliminate the operation of sub-standard ships through a harmonized system of Port State Control. A list of ships that are currently under detention in the Paris MoU region can be consulted here.

The 2,622 gross tonnage Crown Mary had sailed from New Holland, located on the Humber Estuary opposite Hull, a major North Sea ferryport. Just over a year ago Afloat previously reported of another detained cargoship Burhou I in Wicklow. Again this albeit smaller cargoship was employed in the timber trade.

The Paris MoU (Memorandum of Understanding) on Port State Control (PSC) was signed in January 1982 by fourteen European countries at a Ministerial Conference held in Paris, France. It entered into operation on 1 July 1982. The principles of the MoU also cover the following:
Safety of life at sea
Prevention of pollution by ships, and
Living and working conditions on board ships

The Paris MoU on PSC is an administrative agreement between 27 Maritime Authorities. The participating maritime Administrations of the Paris MoU covers the waters of the European coastal States and the North Atlantic basin from North America to Europe.

Since the detention was imposed last Saturday, Afloat had noted the 88m Crown Mary shift berths within Wicklow Port. This involved the vessel vacate the main commercial Packet Quay to the East Pier so to enable other cargoships to dock. So far two ships have called, Thea Marieke also Dutch flagged arrived from Sheerness, Kent. Last night the vessel docked in Dublin and this morning Scot Pioneer called to Wicklow having sailed overnight from Warrenpoint.

Only the day before the detention, Wicklow recieved the first call of the newly renamed car ferry Fraser Aisling Gabrielle. The 44-car capacity ferry made an overnight stop while en route from Waterford to Greenore from where next month a new Carlingford Lough service is to operate to Greencastle. 

Update May 24 2017: Detention of Dutch Flagged Cargoship In Wicklow Port Is Lifted

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Detained- A cargoship from Scotland that was detained in Wicklow Port for a more than a week including St. Patrick's Day, finally departed last night bound for Belfast, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 674 tonnes Burhou I was detained by Port State Control at Wicklow Port, having discharged a cargo of round timber from Kyle of Lochalsh in western Scotland. This is a regular trade to the port as featured previously on Afloat.

Burhou I is a Belize flagged small coaster which was detained following an inspection by authorities. The detention surrounded a single technical deficiency to resolve, before the ship departed yesterday in the early evening.

The detention of the 58m long Burhou I involved having to shift berths within Wicklow Harbour. This led to the cargoship berthing alongside the non-commercial East Pier.

It is from this vantage point where spectators gather to watch the Round Ireland Yacht Race hosted by the nearby Wicklow Sailing Club located at the foot of the pier.

The veteran cargsoship built by a German yard in 1978 is a sister of Isis (see, visit to Ramsey, Isle of Man). Both coasters have self-loading and discharging capabilities to transport a variety of cargoes among them timber felled in Scotland. 

These coasters regularly trade throughout the Irish Sea and also to ports in south-west England. In addition they provide a domestic freight service to the smaller harbours in the Scottish Outer Isles.

Also in the port during the week was the 82m long Nestor. This was only the second call to the port of the 2,452 tonnes cargoship that loaded scrap metal in recent days and departed for Liverpool.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#DetainedBulker- A High Court judge has expressed concern for the crew of a Belize registered 19,000 tonnes cargo ship detained in Dublin Port since last March and who have not been paid since late last year.

The 17 crew, represented by the International Transport Workers Federation, had brought proceedings against the owner of the MV Clipper Faith for unpaid wages of approximately $320,000.

The ship's owner, the Liberian-registered Afternoon Maritime, said it lacked funds to pay the crew, who are largely from Russia and Ukraine. For more on this story, The Irish Times has a report.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

Fastnet Race 2023 Date

The 2023 50th Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Saturday, 22nd July 2023

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At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 695 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Cherbourg
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

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