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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Bay

A consignment of huge granite boulders has arrived into Dun Laoghaire by barge to be used as rock armour to protect Dun Laoghaire's new jetty from erosion.

The new Scotsman's Bay quay, as Afloat.ie previously reported, which has taken shape this winter, is Dublin's newest quay for swimming and fishing. It is also intended to be an embarkation point for small boats and canoes.

The rock armour to surround the new jetty can only be positioned at sea at certain stages of the tide, a job that is expected to take a fortnight to complete, weather permitting.

Published in Dublin Bay
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The start sequence for this Sunday's second DBSC Turkey Shoot race will repeat the starts of last week's opening race that was won by the RIYC J109 White Mischief. Results here

 A great Turkey Shoot turnout out of 65 boats from an entry of 75 is a major boost for winter sailing on Dublin Bay.

Handicaps and starts for the second race sponsored by Citroen are downloadable below with a reminder that due to World War One centenary commemorations the first start is 1410 this Sunday.

The DMYC Dinghy Frostbite series will be in progress in the harbour with a first gun 13.57. There are 91 entries in the dinghy event, so the harbour will be busy from about 1.30 onward. Turkey Shoot yachts heading to the bay are asked to keep clear of the dinghy race course.

Published in Turkey Shoot
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Writing in the Irish Times Sailing Column this morning, David O'Brien predicts that Colin Byrne's XP33 'Bon Exemple' will be the winner of the top performing cruiser-racer in the country's biggest racing fleet this season. Dublin Bay Sailing Club has yet to announce its six premier awards for its gala prizegiving in a fortnight's time but front-runners are already clear from the summer season's results.

This morning's sailing column also reveals how outgoing Commodore Chris Moore is to fill the shoes of the DBSC Hon Sec Donal O'Sullivan who retires after 27 years in the role.

For much more click here.

Published in X-Yachts GB & IRL
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This year's Centenary of the wartime sinking of the mailboat RMS Leinster on 10th October 1918 will see a significant Dun Laoghaire and national commemoration on the day itself writes W M Nixon. As part of the buildup to those official events on Wednesday 10th October 2018, this weekend the sailing community is giving special Leinster Centenary emphasis to two major annual events on Sunday - the Dun Laoghaire Motor YC's Kish Race, and the Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association Leinster Plate Race.

Inaugurated in 2013 in memory of the Leinster tragedy, the Leinster Plate was presented by the Post Office Workers Union to the DB Old Gaffers Association to mark the OGA’s Golden Jubilee in that year, and to particularly recall that the numerous death toll on the Leinster included 21 postal workers who had been working in the ship’s sorting room at the time the torpedo struck. Normally the Leinster Plate would be raced for in June. But for 2018, the Race will be held this Sunday, 23rd September, in conjunction with the annual Kish Race organised by the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. DMYC expects that there will be approximately 70 boats competing in the Kish Race.

The main Kish Race starts just outside Dun Laoghaire harbour at 1030 on Sunday morning and the DBOGA Leinster Plate Race will start on the same line at 1045. As usual, the DBOGA course will either follow or cross the track of the RMS Leinster on that fateful day in 1918. The Leinster Plate will be presented to the winner during the official commemorations in Dun Laoghaire on October 10th. Starting this year, the winner will also be presented with a replica of the Leinster Plate which he or she will retain for the year.

This Saturday 22nd September, DBOGA (most of whom are based at Poolbeg Y & BC) will organise an afternoon race, starting around 1500 hrs near Poolbeg Lighthouse, to take the fleet to Dun Laoghaire. VHF channel 77 will be used for race information on Saturday afternoon. Boats will moor in Dun Laoghaire Marina on Saturday night, and there will be a social evening hosted by DMYC in their clubhouse.

However, in view of the unsettled period of exceptionally stormy weather being currently experienced, DBOGA have stated that they will be making a definitive confirmation of their weekend’s arrangements on Saturday morning. Meanwhile, Neil Colin of DMYC and organiser of the Kish Race has been closely monitoring the weather and a range of prediction sources and agrees that while some forecasts are not favourable, others are more optimistic for Sunday. He told Afloat.ie this morning:

“We plan to stand over our plans to run the Kish race as scheduled but will review the situation on Saturday. Our contingency plan is simply to postpone the race one week, to Sunday 30th September, and in the event, we have to abandon, all entries will be fully refunded.

While we aim to be responsible organisers, the final responsibility rests with the Skippers to consider the safety of their crew and craft, and to make the decision to sail or not, bearing in mind their own abilities and expectations”.

Published in Dublin Bay
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Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) 2018 Saturday programme will proceed as scheduled now that the Waterfront Club Regatta season has concluded on Dublin Bay.

DBSC will have the usual combination of Hut and committee boat starts for its Saturday racing. 

This Saturday, the 14th July, the Red Fleet will start at MacLir and the Blue Fleet at the Hut, according to DBSC Hon Secretary Donal O’Sullivan who has set out the programme in a circular to the club's 22 classes.

Meanwhile, click below for Afloat.ie's coverage of the Dublin regatta season: 

Wave Regatta at Howth Yacht Club 

DMYC 'King of the Bay' Regatta

National Yacht Club Regatta 

Royal Irish Yacht Club Regatta

Royal St. George Yacht Club Regatta

Published in DBSC
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DMYC kicks off the 2018 Dun Laoghaire Regatta season this Saturday with their “King of the Bay” regatta. It looks as if the weather gods are still favouring this weekend's sailing activities, with a Northeasterly, 10–knots forecast and a likelihood of a sea breeze filling in, to make sailing more interesting.

Racing starts for the cruisers and yachts at 11.30 off the West Pier, and at12.00 for the dinghies in Seapoint Bay. While the Dublin Bay hut is still not in position, it is planned to be put in place on Saturday morning after alteration to the base structure. “We also have a Plan B”, says DMYC's Neil Colin.

In what the DMYC describes as 'an effort to shake up the traditional regatta format' and 'encourage entries from outside the traditional Dublin Bay Sailing Club classes', the cruiser/yacht racing is on a semi–coastal course, while the dinghies race initially in a pursuit race “hare & tortoise” style, where the leader at the time limit is the winner, followed by a traditional PY handicap race.

"Cruiser/yacht racing is on a 'semi–coastal' course"

Entries have been brisk over the recent days ranging from J109’s to Lasers, with the regular Dublin Bay One Design classes such as Ruffians, Flying Fifteens and Shipmans are well represented.

The entry is available on the club website here. As a special encouragement, the late entry fee has been waived.

Published in DMYC
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When sailors arrived to rig for the DMYC Dinghy Frostbites on Sunday the wind was considerably less than the 6-12 knots promised by Windguru but by the time boats got afloat an encouraging 8 knots plus ENE had kicked in. The race committee broke with the winter long tradition of racing inside the harbour and headed out to sea to set a startline in the lee of the west pier. Sadly the wind decreased and flicked about making it difficult for the committee to settle the windward mark of the triangular course. By the time the fast PY/Fireball start was underway the fleet were faced with a slop but precious little air to get off the line. Lingering on their startline were some Lasers from the previous start who just couldn't get moving. The Fireballs, 470, Finn and K1 all managed to ghost off the line but some did better than others. Starting near the committee boat Noel Butler and guest crew got away most cleanly followed by Neil Colin/Margaret Casey, David & Michael Keegan and wallowing behind them Frank Miller/Ed Butler and Mick Creighton /Hermine O'Keeffe. The latter were particularly unfortunate to find the worst hole on the line.

On the beat Butler went middle-right while Miller and Keegan went close to the port layline. It was clear to everyone that the better wind was out to sea but getting out to it was downright painful. The top reach had a good angle and a fair breeze which saw Butler lead Colin, the Keegans, Miller and Creighton. On the very broad second reach the breeze faded again and the boats took very different angles towards the leeward. Butler went sharp left to keep his boat moving, Colin went somewhat right while Miller and the Keegans soaked down in a slow straight line. This paid off for Miller who arrived at the leeward behind Butler but ahead of the rest. By this stage the breeze, if you could call it a breeze, had shifted left and getting to the weather mark seemed a straight line fetch. This left Miller looking good as Butler had gone initially right but on that fetch the breeze died away for a time leaving him going backwards in a hole with the tide pushing him away from the mark.

The Committe boat now accepted the inevitable and steamed to the windward to shorten course. Butler managed to get to the right hand layline and finished quite smartly while the rest struggled on up the "beat" which at times was now a run according to spinning burgees. Colin sailed a higher angle than Miller and came very close to overtaking but Miller found a zepher and got moving again and finished some 20 seconds ahead. To both their surprise Creighton finished immediately behind having somehow snuck up from the right, with the Keegans finishing next. With PY adjustments Butler was the clear winner but on adjustment Des Fortune in his Finn and Tom Murphy in his K1 had squeezed in ahead of Miller, Colin and Keegan and Gerry Ryan with Jim McAree in their 470 had nipped in ahead of the Keegans.

In the overall series in Fast PY Butler/Marie Barry are the unassailable leaders on 11 points with Miller/Ed Butler on 31 points, Neil Colin/Mgt Casey on 49 points and Des Fortune on 58 points. There are two more sailing Sundays with the final race taking place on the 24th.

Published in DMYC
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It was a well known Dublin Bay sailor who came to the rescue of a swimmer at the height of Storm Emma yesterday in the popular bathing spot of Sandycove in County Dublin.

As social media revealed, it was the quick thinking actions of Royal St. George Yacht Club member Philip Lee, a Dun Laoghaire resident, that led to the successful rescue at the storm lashed harbour, a location where the Coastguard had earlier urged people to stay out of the water.

Lee made a skilful and exceptionally long and accurate throw of the lifebuoy (see video below), enabling the woman swimmer to grab on to the line. Her location at the time of the incident was periously close to the harbour mouth where she risked being swept out to sea.

The footage posted on social media shows people rushing to help the woman.

The coastal road in Dun Laoghaire was closed due to high winds and flooding.

The gardaí confirmed the incident, stating that a few people took to the water during the code red weather alert.

The Coastguard have urged people to act responsibly and not to go swimming in any lakes, rivers or in the sea.

Published in Dublin Bay
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Taking flight from Dún Laoghaire Harbour on Sunday, 20th May, the Red Bull Flugtag will return to Irish shores this summer. It will see over 50 teams attempt to push the limits of human flight, as they launch their handcrafted flying machines in front of over 40,000 spectators. 

Red Bull Flugtag challenges the brave and brainy to design, build and pilot homemade flying machines off a 9-metre high flight deck, in the hope of soaring into the wild blue yonder…or more often, to plunge into the waters below. Flugtag, which means “flying day” in German, pushes the envelope of human-powered flight but competitors need more than airtime to reach the podium. Teams are judged on three criteria: flight distance, creativity of the craft, and showmanship. These criteria have inspired flying tacos, prehistoric pterodactyls, and even Snoopy and the gang to grace the Flugtag flight decks! 

In 2011, Dublin celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Red Bull Flugtag series and they are bringing back the madness to the capital on 20th May, 2018. 

If you are interested in participating, applications open 21st February. Five-member teams of aspiring aviators and courageous craftsmen and women can apply for a chance to compete at Red Bull Flugtag 2018 by submitting flying-machine plans. The deadline to submit craft designs is 31st March. 

Applying to participate in Red Bull Flugtag is free. Pilots and participants must be 18 or older.

Published in Dublin Bay

Photographer John Coveney captures the second Full Moon of January 2018, a "blue" moon, breaks through the clouds over Dublin Bay at dusk on 31st January.

Sorrento Terrace in Dalkey is in the foreground. The Muglins Light (left) and the Kish Lighthouse (right) are behind.

Published in Dublin Bay
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Page 4 of 89

The Rolex Fastnet Race - This biennial offshore pilgrimage attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge. For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.  The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish is in Plymouth, Devon via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Plymouth. The lighthouse first shone its light on New Year’s Day in 1854
  • Fastnet Rock originally had six keepers (now unmanned), with four on the rock at a time with the other two on leave. Each man did four weeks on, two weeks off

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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