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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale

Royal Cork J/109 Jelly Baby was the winner of SCORA's coastal race from Kinsale to Baltimore completing the passage in a corrected time of 7 hours 57 minutes and 16 seconds. 

There were six entrants for the overnight feeder race to join boats already in Baltimore and Schull for next week's Calves Week Regatta

It is the second coastal victory for the Brian Jones skippered Crosshaven yacht this season, having previously won Kinsale Yacht Club's Fastnet Race in July.

The Jones crew beat Michael Carroll's larger Elan 40 from Kinsale that finished on a corrected time of 8:53:01.

Frank Doyle's J112 Cara was the only other finisher with George Radley's Half Tonner Cortegada, Frank Caul's Prince of Tides and Padraig O'Donovan's Chameleon all retiring.

The six boat SCORA Kinsale to Baltimore Race fleet make slow progress along the West Cork coast The six boat SCORA Kinsale to Baltimore Race fleet make slow progress along the West Cork coast Photo: Bob Bateman

A prizegiving will be held at Baltimore Sailing Club today. 

Published in SCORA
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Following the departure of Paul Murphy after 18 years of service, Richard McKinlay has been appointed Marina Manager at Kinsale Yacht Club.

He is joined by Ciaran Newport as Maintenance Technician on the marina.

The club has installed a mesh network for Wi-Fi on the marina.

Published in Kinsale
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Wins in the second and third races in the Squib Southern Championships at Kinsale Yacht Club this afternoon has handed the overnight lead to Northern Ireland's Peter Wallace and Fiona Ward.

The Wallace and Ward partnership from Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club on Belfast Lough have a four-point cushion over local Kinsale pair Matthias Hellstern and Colm Daly on 11 points. 

KYC pair Matthias Hellstern and Colm Daly are lying in second Photo: Bob BatemanKYC pair Matthias Hellstern and Colm Daly are lying in second place Photo: Bob Bateman

Currently in third place, Kinsale clubmates Ian Travers and Keith O'Riordan are on 12 points. 

12 boats are competing with ten from the host club and two Northern visitors.

Full results are here

Racing continues tomorrow

Published in Squib
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A well-timed postponement meant the nine-boat Kinsale Yacht Club SCORA Fastnet Race got away in a great breeze this morning at 10 am for its annual offshore race even though the fleet will not now round the Rock but the much closer Kowloon Bridge south cardinal buoy instead. 

Scroll down for start photo gallery below

The Kowloon Bridge buoy that marks the position of a wrecked ship is just off Toe Head on the West Cork coast giving boats a much easier chance of completing the course back to Kinsale in the forecasted light winds.

The boats started on a tight reach before popping spinnakers as they reached Kinsale's harbour mouth.

Sponsored by UK Sailmakers Ireland, the fleet includes the on form host club J109 entry of Artful Dodjer (Finnbarr O'Regan). 

The Kinsale J109 entry of Artful Dodjer (Finnbarr O'Regan)The Kinsale J109 entry of Artful Dodjer (Finnbarr O'Regan) Photo: Bob Bateman

Last year's winner the Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy) is also racing along with the Grand Soleil 34 Justina (John Treanor) from the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire Harbour as well as other cruiser racers, Reavra Too, White Tiger, Valfreya and Flyover from Dunmore East in County Waterford. 

Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy)Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy) Photo: Bob Bateman

The Dublin Bay Grand Soleil 34 Justina with skipper John Treanor (left) and among the crew Adam Winkelmann (Second from left) the organiser of June's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race Photo: Bob BatemanThe Dublin Bay Grand Soleil 34 Justina dockside in Kinsale with skipper John Treanor (left) and among the crew Adam Winkelmann (second from left) the organiser of June's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race Photo: Bob Bateman

Bob Bateman's Kinsale SCORA Fastnet Race Start Photo Gallery

Published in Kinsale
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Kinsale RNLI’s lifeboat launched on Saturday 3 July to help a solo yachtsman struggling at sea with damaged sails.

The yachtsman had left the Caribbean island of Carriacou on Thursday 13 May en route to the UK. But three weeks into the voyage, the 51ft ketch lost engine power, forcing the skipper to continue his 6,500km journey under sail.

He told his rescuers that his yacht was becalmed in the Atlantic for 10 days when the wind dropped. Then after he was able to resume his voyage, the sails were damaged, further hampering progress.

By the time the Irish Coast Guard became aware of his plight on Saturday morning, the vessel was travelling at just three knots per hour with no prospect of reaching its intended destination.

Kinsale RNLI’s volunteers tracked the vessel online throughout the day and grew increasingly concerned for its safety. At 6pm, the lifeboat was requested to launch by the coastguard to assess the situation, and the crew located the vessel off the Old Head of Kinsale.

Lifeboat helm Jonathan Connor placed crew member Felix Milner on board the stricken yacht and, after consultation, decided that taking the ketch under tow was necessary to assist the vessel to reach the nearest safe and suitable port.

Milner remained on board the yacht on the final leg of the journey to Kinsale Harbour to safeguard the wellbeing of the skipper, who was exhausted but uninjured despite his long ordeal.

After arriving into Kinsale at 9.15pm, the yachtsman enjoyed his first hot shower in over seven weeks before being reunited with his son and two daughters, who live in West Cork and were waiting for him on the pier.

Commenting on the rescue, the yachtsman said: “The RNLI Kinsale are some of the nicest people I have ever met. Their expertise and commitment leave me humbled. It is an institution I have always supported and will do so for the rest of my days.”

Kinsale helm Connor added: “It is a tribute to the yachtsman’s seamanship that he made a 6,500km voyage single-handed and remained calm and focused despite the many problems he encountered in the course of his journey.

“He is very fit and able but was clearly exhausted after 52 days alone at sea and it was the right decision to help him over the final hurdle and bring him safely to Kinsale.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kinsale RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was launched on Friday afternoon (25 June) to help an injured sailor on a racing yacht competing in the Sovereign’s Cup.

Volunteers were paged before 2pm following a report to the Irish Coast Guard that a crew member had sustained a head injury after being struck by the boom.

The yacht was met by the Kinsale lifeboat just off Charles Fort, where an RNLI volunteer boarded the Class One vessel to carry out a medical assessment.

As the casualty was bleeding heavily from a head wound, lifeboat helm Jim Grennan decided the safest course of action was to transfer him to the lifeboat and bring him to Kinsale for immediate medical attention. The casualty was accompanied by the yacht skipper who was deeply concerned for his welfare.

Emergency medical personnel had been alerted before the lifeboat launched and the RNLI crew handed the man into their care, where he received stitches to his head wound.

Lifeboat helm Jim Grennan said: “These accidents can happen to even the most experienced sailors and the crew on board the racing yacht remained calm and followed the correct procedures to the letter.

“They had dressed the casualty’s wound and the yacht skipper stayed with him throughout his ordeal until he received the all-clear from the medical team in Kinsale.

“We were happy to be able to bring him back safely and commend the yacht crew for their swift reactions.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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After the first two races in IRC Class One, Pat Kelly's Storm from Howth Yacht Club and Rush Sailing Club leads the 14-boat division of the O'Leary Insurances Sovereign's Cup Regatta at Kinsale. 

Kelly is five points clear at the top after two races sailed in light to medium winds on the first day of the biennial event that has attracted a total fleet of 62 boats for the four-day event.

Close combat - J109s make up ten of the 14 boat IRC of fleet at the 2021 Sovereign's Cup  Photo: Bob BatemanClose combat - J109s make up ten of the 14 boat IRC of fleet at the 2021 Sovereign's Cup Photo: Bob Bateman

Dominating the top three places overall after day one, J109s also sit in second and third places in that division too. Kelly's clubmates Richard Colwell and John Murphy are second in Outrajeous with Royal Cork's Jelly Baby skippered by Brian Jones in third but tied on points.

Olson 30 leads IRC Two

In five boat Division Two IRC, Royal Cork's Olson 30 Coracle VI skippered by Kieran Collins leads from two half tonners on three points. David Kelly's Half Tonner King One is one point behind in second place with Cove Sailing Club's Cortegada on five points in third overall. 

The Olson 30 Coracle VI skippered by Kieran CollinsThe Olson 30 Coracle VI skippered by Kieran Collins

Quarter Tonner leads IRC Three 

A Royal Cork Quarter Tonner leads a five boat IRC 3 Division with Dave O'Regan, Denise Phelan and Tony Donworth's Supernova on top from David Lane's YaGottaWanna. In third place is Rob O'Reilly's BonJourno! Part Deux from Monkstown Bay Sailing Club.

Twomey takes White Sail win

A combined fleet of almost 20 White Sails entries racing in two Divisions enjoyed a single race that started and finished inside Kinsale Harbour off the historic Charles Fort saw veteran paralympian and former Kinsale YC Commodore John Twomey take the opening race bullet both on the water and under ECHO handicap.

White Sails principal race officer Donal Hayes sent both fleets off on different courses yet still managed to have the last boats in both finish within one minute of one another.

Sovereign's Cup provisional results after day one here 

Sovereign's Cup Day One Photo Gallery By Bob Bateman


Published in Sovereign's Cup
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The largest boat currently racing in the Sovereigns Cup series at Kinsale is Conor Doyle's locally-based Xp50 Freya. For most of us, she's a biggy, and an elegant one at that. But if you were to exit Kinsale Yacht Club through its venerable original front door and amble town-wards along O'Connell Street, you'd soon reach the office of Rob Doyle Design, and find yourself grappling with decidedly abstruse concepts of big boat size several multiples of Freya.

For if you could inveigle your way therein, you'd find that one of the ideas they're working on is Project Fury, a concept 63-metre sloop-rigged superyacht which they're developing in tandem with Van Geest Design, with whom they're already working on two 52 metre sailboats under construction in The Netherlands.

He's used to dealing with big numbers – Rob Doyle in his Kinsale design office.He's used to dealing with big numbers – Rob Doyle in his Kinsale design office.

It boggles the mind as to why they've selected a name like Project Fury, but to get a notion of the proposed boat's size, there's some basis in the fact that 63 metres is 206ft, and therefore simple souls will latch onto the fact that she's more than four times longer than Freya. But that's only a distraction. Boat size increases volumetrically, and the figures zoom up exponentially. 

It all looks clean and simple, but there's an enormous design challenge in having all sail controls effective yet invisible, while incorporating features whereby the stern area opens up to become an on-board lido.It all looks clean and simple, but there's an enormous design challenge in having all sail controls effective yet invisible, while incorporating features whereby the stern area opens up to become an on-board lido.

Thus as Project Furey's beam is envisaged as being 43ft, while her substantial and several-decked hull depth is augmented by a large multi-storey coachroof, it could be argued that she's all of twenty-fives times larger than Freya, and it wouldn't surprise us at all to hear that the factor is much greater then that.

Either way, it's an awful lot of boat. Yet the two design teams are determined to optimise her performance, so there's a certain creative dynamic tension between the Kinsale team's tradition of elegance and comfort, and the Dutch group's fondness for lightweight yet hyper-strong austerity. Either way, some very advanced construction techniques and special materials are involved at every level.

For the rest of us, it all looks entirely off the wall. But in this even-more-crazy-than-usual world of ours, Superyachts are currently one of the happening areas of economic activity and realisation.

But whether we'll ever see her in Kinsale is another matter. Even if the draft can be adjusted to suit the available depths, the masthead will be scraping expensively against the cloud-base……

Imagine being on the helm of a machine like this – even the Masters of the Universe will have to form an orderly queue…..Imagine being on the helm of a machine like this – even the Masters of the Universe will have to form an orderly queue…..

Published in Superyachts
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A busy weekend for Kinsale RNLI continued on bank holiday Monday (7 June) when the inshore lifeboat launched twice to assist boats in difficulty.

Miss Sally Anne Baggy II - Never Fear, Baggy’s Here launched at 2.45pm to assist the 20ft sailing boat with two people on board, which was taking on water and in danger of sinking off the Old Head of Kinsale.

After assessing the situation, the lifeboat crew transferred one of their number onto the bow of the stricken vessel to raise the hull and slow the ingress of water.

This stabilised the boat, which was taken under tow and brought safely to Kinsale’s main pier.

Lifeboat helm Jonathan Connor said: “The two people on board played it by the book and were able to give the coastguard the necessary information to enable us to quickly find them.

“One had radio training and both were wearing lifejackets, which are essential if you are going on the water.”

A few hours later, the volunteers answered their fourth emergency callout of the bank holiday weekend when the lifeboat was tasked to assist a yacht that had lost its mast.

The inshore lifeboat was on the way at 6pm to assist the 26ft vessel with two people on board just south of the harbour mouth.

After ascertaining that the passengers were uninjured, two lifeboat crew members boarded the yacht and secured the mast before it was safely towed back to Kinsale Harbour.

Kinsale RNLI’s Connor, who was helm on all four callouts over the weekend, added: “We expected the sunny weather and easing of restrictions to bring more people to the Kinsale area, but we were quite surprised to be called out four times in such a short period.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kinsale RNLI’s inshore lifeboat took part in a multi-agency rescue yesterday morning (Saturday 5 June) after a crew member spotted a man in the sea in a remote area close to the Old Head of Kinsale.

The lifeboat was on a routine training exercise off Garretstown beach at 9am when crewman David Carter saw the exhausted casualty being repeatedly swept back off the rocks.

Volunteer lifeboat helm Jonathan Connor immediately alerted Valentia Coast Guard to request helicopter assistance as sea conditions prevented the lifeboat from reaching the casualty.

RNLI volunteers Jon Hynes and Colum O’Sullivan entered the water and swam in to help the man to safety and assess his medical condition, with the Old Head coastguard unit and Kinsale Garda also on the scene.

The Irish Coast Guard’s helicopter Rescue 115 was tasked from Shannon and winched the man aboard to take him for further medical treatment.

Kinsale lifeboat volunteer David Carter who spotted the casualty on the rocks | Credit: RNLI/KinsaleKinsale lifeboat volunteer David Carter who spotted the casualty on the rocks | Credit: RNLI/Kinsale

Lifeboat helm Jonathan Connor said: “He is a very lucky man as David spotted him by pure coincidence. We have no idea how the man entered the water, but he was alone in a fairly remote area so it is unlikely anyone else would have seen him and raised the alarm.

“We are all relieved that we decided to train in that area this morning, and that we were able to work with the other emergency services to bring the casualty to safety.”

Shortly after returning to Kinsale lifeboat station, the crew launched for a second time in response to concerns for the safety of a person on board a small inflatable RIB who had been at sea for longer than expected in the area of the Sovereign Islands.

Rescue 115 was also tasked, along with members of Oysterhaven and Summercove Coast Guard units. The vessel was located and escorted back to the safety of Oysterhaven.

Connor added: “We urge everyone who is going on or near the water this Bank Holiday weekend to exercise extreme caution as the water is treacherous, despite the sunshine.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

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Fastnet Race 2023 Date

The 2023 50th Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Saturday, 22nd July 2023

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At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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