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Displaying items by tag: Lower Lough Erne

Inspections and repairs will be taking place on the Erne System later this month, according to Waterways Ireland.

On Upper Lough Erne, inspection work on the underside of Lady Brooke Bridge in Co Fermanagh will begin next Monday 11 October, continuing until Friday 22 October.

Pontoons will be in used to carry out the inspections and the bridge will be partially closed off to vessels during this period.

Masters of Vessels and waterways users are also advised that Corradillar Slipway and jetty will be used for assembly of the pontoons on 11 October and for disassembling the pontoons on 22 October.

Elsewhere, on Lower Lough Erne, major works will be taking place at Portora Lock gates outside Enniskillen on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 October.

The lock gates will be closed over these two days, from 8am on the Thursday to 7pm on the Friday.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland confirms it has been advised by DfI Rivers in Northern Ireland that users of the Erne System can expect reducing water levels throughout the navigation from this weekend.

It follows from the planned lowering of water levels on Lower Lough Erne from this Friday 1 October to a minimum of 149 feet (above Poolbeg Ordnance datum) in anticipation of increased rain during autumn and winter, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

If water levels do fall, masters of vessels on the inland waterways of the Erne System should be aware of the following:

  • Navigation — To reduce the risk of grounding, masters should navigate on or near the centreline of the channel, avoid short cutting in dog-legged channels and navigating too close to navigation markers.
  • Mooring of Vessels — Masters should be aware that water levels may change rapidly and that mooring lines will require adjustment therefore these should be checked regularly.
Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft that diving operations will take place at Lough Erne Yacht Club on Lower Lough Erne from Monday 4 January for around seven days.

A diving alpha flag will be present at the location of the dive site, and masters of vessels on the inland waterway should proceed with additional caution when in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Missing - A body was recovered yesterday evening (Monday 10 September) in the search for a missing man on Lower Lough Erne, as the Belfast Telegraph reports.

A major search operation was launched in Sunday afternoon after an incident involving a personal watercraft in Muckross Bay.

One man was rescued after swimming to shore but a second had disappeared.

Searches continued into Monday, with the PSNI confirming the body of a man was recovered from the lough later in the day.

“It would appear that what had started out as an exciting afternoon on a jet ski unfortunately has now ended with a fatality,” said Ulster Unionist MLA Rosemary Barton.

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in News Update
Tagged under

#Missing - The PSNI and emergency services launched a major search operation yesterday afternoon (Sunday 9 September) when a man was reported missing after an incident with a personal watercraft on Lower Lough Erne.

According to RTÉ News, one man was rescued after swimming to the shore following the incident in Muckross Bay around 5.30pm.

An RNLI spokesperson said the search for the second individual is ongoing, and involves the PSNI boat and the Irish Coast Guard’s Rescue 118 helicopter from Sligo as well as fire and mountain rescue services.

Elsewhere, The Irish Times reports that a 12-year-old boy was rescued after falling on rocks at Bullock Harbour in Dalkey yesterday afternoon. The child, with a suspected ankle injury, was airlifted to hospital by the Dublin-based coastguard helicopter.

Published in News Update

#Enniskillen - The Sunday Life reports that a woman has died after falling from a boat in Enniskillen in the early hours of yesterday morning (Saturday 26 August).

The PSNI recovered the woman and a man from the waters of Lower Lough Erne after reports that they had fallen in near their boat mooring at the Round O jetty.

Both were transferred to South West Acute Hospital for treatment but the woman, aged 49, was pronounced dead shortly after. A post-mortem is expected.

The Sunday Life has more on the story HERE.

Published in News Update

#RNLI - Kilrush RNLI in Co Clare was diverted from exercise training on Tuesday 28 May when the lifeboat came to the assistance of a 10ft boat.

The volunteer lifeboat crew at Kilrush were returning from their weekly training exercise at 8.45pm when they were requested to go in search of a vessel that had lost its moorings at Tarbert pier.

After relaying the situation to the Coast Guard at Valentia and getting permission to launch, the inshore lifeboat Edith Louise Eastwick set off to the Tarbert area and carried out an extensive search. Weather conditions at the time were blowing force three to four northerly winds.

The crew continued eastwards and crossed over to the Labasheeda region where they located the 10ft punt off Kilkerrin Point.

After securing the vessel to the lifeboat, the crew brought it back to Tarbert pier where the owners were waiting. The vessel was handed over and a request that a new mooring line be put in place was made.

The call out was crew member Charlie Glynn’s first as helm, having secured the position a month ago.

Earlier that day, Enniskillen RNLI was launched to reports of a cruiser which had run aground on Lower Lough Erne in Co Fermanagh.

The volunteer crew on their inshore lifeboat Joseph and Mary Hiley and the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) proceeded to Inish Davar, two miles from the station. Weather at the time was clear with calm waters.

The crew arrived at the location to find the owner of the vessel on another boat and assisting the casualty boat and the two men and two women who were on board and safe and well. The lifeboat crew stood off and observed from a distance.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#KAYAKING - A fitness instructor from Donegal recently raised funds for a Parkinson's charity by crossing the north of Ireland from east to west with an extraordinary combination of running, cycling, swimming and kayaking.

As the Donegal Democrat reports, James McIntyre spent a weekend traversing the island of Ireland from Newcastle in Co down to Creevy in Co Donegal.

His route that included a mountain run across Sliabh Donard and the Mournes and a cycling portion from Annalong to Enniskillen, before he took to the water for a 35km kayak run along the length of Lower Lough Erne to Beleek and a swim across Assaroe Lake.

McIntyre covered 201km altogether in his epic challenge to raise funds for research into Parkinson's disease, an illness that affected both his and his partner's grandfathers.

The 37-year-old surf lifesaver is no stranger to such efforts, after completing an open sea swim of Donegal Bay last year, also for charity.

The Donegal Democrat has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Kayaking

#ANGLING - A landowner in Co Fermanagh has blocked access to a slipway and moorings used by anglers on his land, as BBC News reports.

Fishermen found the road leading to the site blocked by hay bales after the 10-year lease for access to the facility, near Castle Caldwell on Lower Lough Erne, expired recently.

It is believed that the landowner had reported a number of concerns regarding use of the site to the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL), alledging that some fishermen had been blocking access to his land with their cars and startling farmers' cattle with car horns.

The slipway at the mouth of the Garvary River, which was built with public funds, is reportedly one of the few places boats can be launched between Belleek and Kesh, a popular spot for angling in Northern Ireland.

DCAL says it is negotiating with the landowner and farmers to reopen the lane.

BBC News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
Tagged under

Erne System, Lower Lough Erne, Kesh Marina Jetty

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters of inland waterways vessels that approximately 15m of this jetty in now available for use while the remainder is closed for repair. Access from the jetty to the car park is also available.

A further marine notice will issue when repairs have been completed.

Any inconvenience that this may cause our customers is regretted.

Charles Lawn
Lt Cdr (rtd)
Inspector of Navigation
12 Jan 2011
Tel: 00 353 (0) 90 6494232

Published in Inland Waterways
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RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

Fastnet Race 2023 Date

The 2023 50th Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Saturday, 22nd July 2023

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At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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