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A volunteer crew member at Lough Derg RNLI has become a trauma risk management practitioner for the Dromineer station.

Chris Parker graduated from the RNLI’s Trauma Risk Management Programme (TRiM) this past April.

The TRiM programme aims to provide confidential support and assistance for volunteers who may be dealing with the psychological effects of attending traumatic or distressing callouts.

Currently there are 60 TRiM practitioners within the RNLI across the UK and Ireland — including Parker, who joined the Co Tipperary lifeboat crew two-and-a-half years ago, shortly after moving to the area with his family.

Now a qualified lifeboat crew member, Parker is also Lough Derg RNLI’s health, safety and environmental local liaison.

“I am proud to be able to help fellow volunteers,” he says.

“Sometimes we run towards the bad stuff, and it can take its toll. As a crew member, I want to be there for the members of the public when they are in difficulty, but as a practitioner, I want to be there for my fellow volunteer crew members in the RNLI who may be having their worst day, too.”

As the RNLI is a frontline volunteer emergency service, its crews encounter scenarios and casualty injuries they may never confront in their day jobs.

And in spite of rigorous training in casualty care, volunteers respond differently to the reality of what they’ve encountered.

In most instances following traumatic events, crew will resolve any negative feelings over time. “TRiM is there to support our staff and volunteers from an early stage, to offer peer support,” Parker says.

“To those that require professional help, the TRiM practitioners have the knowledge and training to signpost those services and support.”

All training for frontline staff or volunteers is provided by the RNLI through its partner March on Stress. Parker says that to retain practitioner status, he must meet professional standards through continuous training.

He explains that the initial two-day intensive course covered active listening skills, mentoring, education and risk assessment.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI launched to the aid of a man who had fallen from the cliffs in Loughshinny yesterday afternoon (Sunday 5 September).

The lifeboat volunteers were tasked by Dublin Coast Guard after a 999 call was received reporting that a man had fallen from the clifftop and was trapped on the rocks below.

Shortly after 1pm the Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson was launched and arrived on scene within minutes. The crew quickly spotted the man at the base of the cliff face with some people assisting him.

The lifeboat was manoeuvred as close as possible to the shoreline and was greeted by one of the assistants. They were members of a diving club who had been returning from a dive nearby when they heard the man’s cries for help.

Following a quick briefing on the casualty’s condition, two of the crew made their way ashore to further assess him and perform first aid.

The Irish Coast Guard’s Dublin-based helicopter Rescue 116 was also tasked and landed on the beach at Loughshinny, where the casualty was brought by the lifeboat and put on board the aircraft for transfer to Beaumont Hospital.

Less than 24 hours earlier, at 3.30pm on Saturday afternoon (4 September), the volunteer crew launched to a distress call from a small sailing cruiser with two people on board.

The vessel had suffered steering failure between Skerries and Balbriggan and those on board were struggling to make their way to safety.

Almost immediately after launching, the lifeboat made contact with the stricken vessel as they had managed to regain very limited steering and make their way closer to Skerries.

The lifeboat stood by while the vessel approached the harbour and then assisted them in tying up along the pier.

With the help of one of the station volunteers and a local angler, the steering component that had been damaged was successfully repaired and the pair were able to continue on their journey.

Speaking about the callouts, Skerries RNLI press officer Gerry Canning said: “This was another great example of how well all the emergency services work together, with volunteers and professionals working side by side to ensure the best possible outcome.

“We’d also like to say thank you to the gentlemen from Alpha Dive sub aqua club who did a brilliant job in raising the alarm and assisting the casualty until help arrived.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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When Covid 19 hit last year, fundraising for Howth RNLI Lifeboat through street flag day collections, St. Patrick’s Day Irish Coffee Mornings, Golf Classics, Boat Jumble Sales and Vintage Car Runs all came to an abrupt halt, Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association came to the rescue by organising a winter series of Zoom talks for their members and others.

The talks were presented by a range of interesting speakers: Dennis Aylmer, Michael Weed, Mark Sweetnam, Ed Maggs, Cormac Lowth, Gary McMahon, Peter Lyons & Adrian Spence, Mick Brogan, John Leahy, Jarlath Cunnane, Rob Goodbody, Joe Walsh, Richard Nairn, Sean Walsh, Sean Cullen, Brian O Gaiblin and Rik Janssen.

The fantastic result from these very interesting presentations is a donation of €8,000 from Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association to Howth RNLI who continue to rely on voluntary contributions and legacies for income. It is only through donations such as this that Howth RNLI continue to provide our volunteer lifeboat crews with the boats, facilities, equipment and training that are essential to save lives at sea.

Howth RNLI presented DBOGA with a Letter of thanks from the Institution for their generous support.

Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association held their annual race at Howth Saturday 4th September with 12 boats competing having sailed from Strangford, Ramsey - Isle of Man, Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club and Dun Laoghaire to compete. The fleet raced back to Poolbeg Lighthouse on Sunday 5th September.

Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association will be kicking off this winter’s fundraising programme for Howth RNLI with another series of talks beginning in October.

Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association can be proud that their generosity will help us to continue to respond quickly and efficiently to those in danger on the sea, today and in the future.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Baltimore RNLI were called out twice within 12 hours today (Saturday 4 September), firstly to provide assistance to two people when their vessel went aground, and secondly to provide assistance to a sailing boat that had capsized.

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 6.16 am, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go to the assistance of a 50 foot converted trawler, with two people on board, which had run aground in the Ilen River, near Old Court in West Cork.

The Baltimore all-weather lifeboat crew arrived at the casualty vessel at 6.45 am and Coxswain Aidan Bushe immediately assessed the situation. There was no obvious damage done to the trawler and given the fact the tide was falling and she was hard aground, the decision was made not to attempt to refloat her. Baltimore Lifeboat volunteer crew members launched their y-boat and crew members Jerry Smith and Colin Whooley made their way over to the casualty vessel and took two people off the vessel and brought them back to the lifeboat. The lifeboat crew then retrieved the y-boat and the lifeboat made its way back to Baltimore, dropping the two people at the pier before returning to Baltimore lifeboat station at 8.07 am.

At high tide this afternoon the skipper of the casualty vessel managed to refloat the vessel without any further assistance from Baltimore RNLI.

There were six volunteer crew onboard the lifeboat this morning, Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Cathal Cottrell and crew members Sean McCarthy, Don O’Donovan, Jerry Smith and Colin Whooley. Conditions during the call were calm with a north easterly force 2-3 wind, no sea swell and good visibility.

Baltimore all-weather lifeboat pumps out the Y boat  Photo: RNLI/Micheal Cottrell Baltimore all-weather lifeboat pumps out the casualty dinghy  Photo: RNLI/Micheal Cottrell

The volunteer lifeboat crew were also called to launch their all-weather lifeboat at approximately 4.18 pm, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go to the immediate assistance of an 18ft sailing sloop, with three people on board, which was sinking in Baltimore Harbour.

When Baltimore all-weather lifeboat crew arrived at the casualty vessel at 4.24 pm the three people on board had been taken off by the Baltimore Sailing Club crash boat, and the vessel was full of water. The volunteer lifeboat crew immediately readied their onboard salvage pump and proceeded to pump the vessel dry. A local rib that was also in the vicinity at the time assisted in stabilising the casualty vessel whilst it was being pumped out. Once all the water was pumped out the assisting rib towed the casualty vessel back to its mooring within the harbour. Baltimore lifeboat then returned to station arriving at 4.54 pm.

There were five volunteer crew onboard the lifeboat during the second callout, Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Cathal Cottrell and crew members Jerry Smith, Jim Griffiths and Conor Harrington. Conditions within the harbour during the second call were calm with an easterly force 4 wind, no sea swell and good visibility.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The volunteer crew of Bundoran RNLI lifeboat was requested to assist with a medical evacuation from Tullan Strand, Bundoran this morning (Saturday, 4th September).

Shortly before 1 am a request was received from the National Ambulance Service via Malin Head Coast Guard for assistance from shore crew to extract a casualty who had fallen. While the lifeboat was not launched on this occasion, a number of volunteer crew attended to assist with extraction to the waiting ambulance where the casualty was transferred to Sligo University Hospital. The crew are trained in casualty care with a number of them qualified advanced paramedics.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kilmore Quay RNLI rescued three people on Saturday afternoon (28 August) after their 6.3m cruiser got into difficulty 50 miles off the Wexford coast while they were on an angling day trip.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their all-weather Tamar class relief lifeboat Victor Freeman, by the Irish Coast Guard at 1.30pm to assess the situation where the vessel was reported to be taking on water 50 miles south of Kilmore Quay. Tenby RNLI in Wales was also requested and the station’s all-weather lifeboat, also a Tamar, launched too.

Kilmore Quay RNLI’s lifeboat under Coxswain Philip Walsh and with four crew members onboard launched within minutes and made its way to the scene where a fishing trawler was also standing by to assist.

The cruiser had launched earlier that day from Kilmore Quay for a day’s deep-sea fishing. Weather and sea conditions were good at the time. However, when the crew noticed their boat was taking on water, they turned to return to shore and called for assistance.

Both lifeboats arrived on scene within minutes of each other with the crews first checking that all onboard were safe and well. Having assessed the situation, a decision was made to allow the cruiser to continue to make its way back to port under its own power escorted by the Kilmore Quay RNLI while Tenby RNLI returned to their station.

All arrived safely back to Kilmore Quay at 7.05 pm.

Fishing boat

Meanwhile a week earlier, Kilmore Quay RNLI came to the aid of the crew onboard a 24m fishing trawler that had run aground on their return from fishing grounds to their home port. On this occasion on Saturday 21 August, the crew were requested to launch at 6.22am and assess the situation two miles east of Kilmore Quay.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eugene Kehoe and with five crew members onboard arrived on scene within 10 minutes of launching and again checked that all onboard were safe. A decision was made to establish a towline to free the vessel, but the falling tide made it impossible to move the vessel at that time. It was agreed to return later when the rising tide would allow the vessel to be more easily released. The crew of the fishing vessel remained onboard to monitor their boat.

At 4pm, Kilmore Quay RNLI returned and re-assessed the situation before successfully establishing a towline and freeing the vessel. The boat returned to Kilmore Quay under escort by the lifeboat and another fishing vessel as a precaution.

Speaking following both call outs, Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager John Grace, said: ‘During the first call out, the falling tide did not allow for the boat to be freed so it became a waiting game until the tide came back to a level to allow us to safely try again and on the second attempt the crew were successful. The fishing crew did a great job monitoring the situation onboard until it became possible to free it again with assistance from our lifeboat crew.

‘In what was the second call out in a week, we were happy to see that the boat’s crew was able to return safely to Kilmore Quay under the boat’ own power. The crew made the right decision to call for assistance when they did as they were in a precarious position taking on water in a busy shipping lane.

‘We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always wear a lifejacket and to always carry a means of calling for help. If you do get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Dunmore East RNLI’s lifeboat volunteers were delighted to receive monies raised from the sales of the book charting the history of the Co Waterford lifeboat.

Dauntless Courage: Celebrating the History of the Dunmore East RNLI, Their Crews and the Maritime Heritage of the Local Community was written, published and sold out during lockdown a year ago.

Restrictions and lockdowns made it impossible for author David Carroll to be in Dunmore East while writing his book, But thankfully David and his family were able to visit the Dunmore Lifeboat station recently, where he was wholeheartedly welcomed by the local lifeboat volunteers.

David is the son of Captain Desmond Carroll, a former Harbour Master in Dunmore. He grew up in Dunmore East and through he moved away from the village in his 20s to pursue a career, he says he has retained a great love for the maritime heritage he inherited growing up in the village.

The book is described as a labour of love, involving several years of researching and writing. The RNLI supported the project, with members of Dunmore East RNLI forming a publishing committee and a total of 66 businesses contributing to the cost of printing. It means that all proceeds go to the charity that saves lives at sea.

Dunmore East RNLI volunteers with author David Carrol and his family at the lifeboat station | Credit: RNLI/Neville MurphyDunmore East RNLI volunteers with author David Carrol and his family at the lifeboat station | Credit: RNLI/Neville Murphy

Recently David was finally able to hand over the huge cheque to the very appreciative volunteers of Dunmore East RNLI.

“I felt very privileged to have been invited to write a history of the Dunmore East lifeboats,” he said. “I enjoyed every single minute carrying out the necessary research and writing the various chapters, but the success of the book is down to all the volunteers and the great team, organised by Brendan Dunne who promoted, packaged, and distributed the book in difficult circumstances.

“A special word of thanks is due to all who gave us permission to use their interesting photographs and wonderful paintings. Our printers, DVF Print and Graphic Solutions, designed and produced a magnificent book that we all can be proud of and will be a fitting testament to all who served in the station since the Henry Dodd first arrived in Dunmore East.

Brendan Dunne of Dunmore East RNLI’s crew said: “As volunteer crew of the Dunmore East lifeboat, we are delighted with David’s book Dauntless Courage and grateful for such a significant amount being raised for our charity.

“The book itself is well written and researched. It truly captures the legacy of those that have crewed the lifeboats here since 1884 and of the lifesaving and maritime heritage of the village. It ensures their contribution to saving lives at sea in all weather conditions will not be forgotten.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A lone sailor was rescued after his boat suffers engine failure and a sail blow out off the Old Head of Kinsale.

The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Trent Class RNLI Lifeboat was called out this afternoon Tuesday at 2 pm to go to the aid of a 30-foot yacht with a lone sailor on board that got into difficulties two miles south-west of the Old Head of Kinsale in West Cork. The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Lifeboat, Frederick Storey Cockburn under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell and a crew of 5 were away quickly from their moorings, after being alerted by the Coastguard that the yacht had suffered engine failure and a sail blow out on passage from Glandore to Kinsale.

Once the Lifeboat reached the causality at 2.26 pm, Lifeboat Coxswain O'Farrell assessed the situation. As the casualty was completely disabled and conditions at sea were worsening, a decision was taken to put the Lifeboat towline on board the yacht and proceed under tow to the nearest port of Kinsale. Conditions at sea today were fresh and blustery Force 5 winds with strong 3 metre swells off the Old Head. The Lifeboat proceeded to tow the causality back to Kinsale at a slow, safe speed and arrived at the safe surrounds of the Harbour Marina at 4.30 pm. The sailor was mighty pleased to see the Lifeboat today and expressed his extreme thanks to all involved in today’s rescue.

The RNLI Lifeboat crewmembers under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell after they arrived back to base in CourtmacsherryThe RNLI Lifeboat crewmembers under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell after they arrived back to base in Courtmacsherry

The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat voluntary Deputy Launching Authority Vincent O'Donovan said, “With the freshening winds today, it was great to reach the causality so quickly and give the Lone sailor the comfort that he required. Great praise is due again for the fast response of all the crew and officers who left their workplaces and rushed to the station to help a fellow seaman in distress at sea this afternoon”.

The Courtmacsherry RNLI Lifeboat Crew involved in this afternoon’s callout were Coxswain Sean O Farrell, Mechanic Stuart Russell and crewmembers Mark John Gannon, Dara Gannon, Dave Philips and Dean Hennessy.

This was the 21st callout of 2021 for the All-Weather Lifeboat Station in Courtmacsherry.

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The Aran Islands volunteer RNLI lifeboat crew were requested by the Irish Coast Guard to launch their All-Weather Severn Lifeboat at 2.48 pm, yesterday (Monday, August 30th). An 11.6 metre angling boat, with nine people aboard, was experiencing engine problems at the back of Inis Mór, the largest of the three Aran Islands, while out on an angling trip.

The lifeboat launched under Coxswain John O'Donnell and a full crew and headed straight for the boat. Weather conditions at the time of launching were good, with a slight East North East breeze, calm seas and good visibility

Once on the scene, the Volunteer Lifeboat crew checked that all aboard were safe and sound, before establishing a tow line.

With the tow line safely secured, the lifeboat proceeded back towards Kilronan Harbour, where the angling boat was brought alongside the pontoon.

Speaking after the call out Aran Islands RNLI Coxswain John O'Donnell said: 'thankfully the weather was calm and a quick response time from the volunteer crew, meant the angling boat and all aboard were brought safely ashore without delay.'

 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Baltimore RNLI was called out to provide assistance to six people on a yacht in difficulty yesterday afternoon (Sunday 29 August) off East Calf Island in West Cork.

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched their all-weather lifeboat at 3 pm, following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to go to the assistance of a 26-foot yacht, with six people on board, which had dismasted just off the East Calf Island in Roaring Water Bay.

The Baltimore all-weather lifeboat crew arrived at the casualty vessel at 3.12 pm and two volunteer lifeboat crewmen were put aboard to assist in the derigging of the mast. Once the mast was secured aboard the yacht and the owners of the yacht were happy the RNLI crewmen returned to the lifeboat and the yacht was able to make its own way under engine to the nearest safe and suitable port. The lifeboat then returned to the station, arriving at 3.55 pm.

There were five volunteer crew onboard the lifeboat, Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Sean McCarthy and crew members Brendan Cottrell, Colin Whooley and Eoin Ryan. Conditions at sea during the call were calm with a south-easterly force 2 wind, no sea swell and good visibility.

 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Page 5 of 244

RORC Fastnet Race

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge.

For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.

The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish for 2021 is in Cherbourg via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Cherbourg.

Fastnet Race - FAQs

The 49th edition of the biennial Rolex Fastnet Race will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, UK on Sunday 8th August 2021.

The next two editions of the race in 2021 and 2023 will finish in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin at the head of the Normandy peninsula, France

Over 300. A record fleet is once again anticipated for the world's largest offshore yacht race.

The international fleet attracts both enthusiastic amateur, the seasoned offshore racer, as well as out-and-out professionals from all corners of the world.

Boats of all shapes, sizes and age take part in this historic race, from 9m-34m (30-110ft) – and everything in between.

The Fastnet Race multihull course record is: 1 day 4 hours 2 minutes and 26 seconds (2019, Ultim Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, Franck Cammas / Charles Caudrelier)

The Fastnet Race monohull course record is: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing).

David and Peter Askew's American VO70 Wizard won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race, claiming the Fastnet Challenge Cup for 1st in IRC Overall.

Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001.

The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result.

The winner of the first Fastnet Race was the former pilot cutter Jolie Brise, a boat that is still sailing today.

Cork sailor Henry P F Donegan (1870-1940), who gave his total support for the Fastnet Race from its inception in 1925 and competed in the inaugural race in his 43ft cutter Gull from Cork.

Ireland has won the Fastnet Race twice. In 1987 the Dubois 40 Irish Independent won the Fastnet Race overall for the first time and then in 2007 – all of twenty years after Irish Independent’s win – Ireland secured the overall win again this time thanks to Ger O’Rourke’s Cookson 50 Chieftain from the Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland in Kilrush.

©Afloat 2020

Fastnet Race 2021 Date

The 2021 Rolex Fastnet Race will start on Sunday 8th August 2021.

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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