Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: port of Cork

The Irish Sailing Association’s 2017 Cruising Conference takes place this year on Saturday, 18 February at the historic Port of Cork offices in Cork city.

The conference is a chance for sailors to hear and discuss the latest knowledge and insights from marine experts, as well as network with a community of their peers. It is sponsored by Union Chandlery and supported by the Cruising Association of Ireland.

This year’s line-up of speakers include Ballymaloe chef Rachel Allen who will discuss recipes from her cookbook “Coast” and look at all the food available along Ireland’s Atlantic coast, from Cork to Donegal.

The conference will also hear from the RNLI (and how to avoid them at sea), the latest research from Irish Lights, stories from a woman-over-board, as well as learn about predicting the weather, unusual tides, and tales on surviving a round-the-world cruising trip.

Tickets for the conference are available here

Published in Cruising
Tagged under

Total traffic through the Port of Cork reached 9.2 million tonnes in 2016, a slight decrease compared to 2015 traffic. Import figures remain steady while exports were reduced primarily due to the closure of Lisheen Mines in Co. Tipperary and the subsequent cessation of exporting lead and zinc through the Port of Cork in 2016.

Total container volumes through both Tivoli and Ringaskiddy Container Terminals grew by 2% compared to 2015 figures, with over 209,000 TEU’s handled. The growth in container handling at the Port of Cork is very encouraging particularly as the Port moves to redevelop Ringaskiddy Port as their main container terminal. In 2016 the largest container vessel to visit an Irish Port called to Ringaskiddy on route from Central America. This weekly service not only ensures the Irish grocery market is fully supplied with fresh fruit, but positions Cork as deep sea port capable of handling panamax size container vessels.

Trade in Dry bulk cargos such as animal feed, fertilisers and cereals saw a marginal decrease while liquid bulk cargo, predominantly the oil traffic handled through Whitegate Oil Refinery now Irving Oil, also reported a slight decrease. Positively, in 2016 family owned Canadian company Irving Oil acquired Phillips 66, securing the future of Whitegate Oil Refinery. This positive step was welcomed by the Port of Cork and will ensure Ireland remains competitive within the global oil market and has a security of supply of crude products that can be refined within the Irish State and not be totally dependent on international events. Whitegate supplies 30-40% of the Irish refined fuel market through its road loading facility and by sea to Irish and international ports over its marine jetty.

Speaking about the 2016 trade traffic figures the Port of Cork Chairman Mr. John Mullins said: ‘The trade results for the Port of Cork in 2016 are overall very encouraging despite some decreases in certain trades. We are very pleased with the results as achieving traffic figures which are in line with pre-recessionary time highlights the positivity returning to the market and I am confident that the port can sustain this growth across 2017. In particular container traffic through Tivoli and Ringaskiddy increased by 2% with imports fractionally higher than exports. There was impressive growth in the imports of trade cars with over 46,000 vehicles imported.’

He continued: ‘In addition to the overall trade traffic figures, the Port of Cork’s cruise business has gone from strength to strength with a total of 58 liners visiting Cork during 2016. This high number of calls brought over 127,000 passengers and crew, helping to drive visitors to the region. Furthermore, in 2016, Cobh was named the second Best Cruise Destination in the British Isles & Western Europe in the first-ever Cruise Critic Cruisers’ Choice Destination Awards, which we are immensely proud of. In 2017 69 cruise liners are scheduled to call and 2018 is looking even stronger.’

2016 saw Brittany Ferries operating another successful year with their service from Cork to Roscoff carrying almost 80,000 passengers in 2016 and it is anticipated that 2017 will be another busy year for Brittany Ferries when sailings resume in March.

In 2015 An Bord Pleanala granted a 10-year planning permission to Port of Cork for the redevelopment of the existing port facilities at Ringaskiddy. In July 2016 the Port of Cork submitted to the Board a request to alter the terms of the permission granted to enhance the long-term sustainability of the port. The €80 million port redevelopment will future proof the facility and Port of Cork look forward to the project progressing in 2017.

Published in Port of Cork
Tagged under

#ThunderChild - Stormy winter seas made the perfect proving ground for a new state-of-the-art naval patrol and rescue vessel tested in Cork Harbour recently, as the Irish Examiner reports.

But it’s just the beginning for Thunder Child – the latest high-tech design from Cork-based Safehaven Marine, makers of the James Bond-style Interceptor, Barracuda – which was launched from the Port of Cork last month.

Safehaven’s managing director Frank Kowalski has his sights set on breaking the record for the fastest circumnavigation of Ireland — including a 1,000km open-sea loop around Rockall.

And considering the sleek wave-cutting vessel has already clocked speeds of over 100kph in testing, and is kitted out to handle the stormiest situations, it should be well up to the task of that challenging route.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cork Harbour

#CityQuarter - In a deal worth up to €14m writes The Irish Examiner, is to be signed in the coming days on a remaining investment — including the Boardwalk bar and restaurant — at Cork city’s seminal City Quarter.

It went to market for Nama in September 2016, guiding €14.5 million.

The investment offer, including remaining 38,000 sq ft of offices, basement car parking and ground floor space at the €100m City Quarter, is close to being bought in one single lot, according to sources. It has an income of €654,000 with scope to double that to €1.33m, according to Savills.

It’s understood that one investor is behind the impending deal, and when concluded, it may involve a re-sale or sub-sale as well as leases of several of the key components.

Click here for more on the deal at the site which Afloat adds is directly opposite to Ardmore Shipping Corporation's 'Irish' office on Albert Quay.

The Bermuda headquartered corporation of a product/chemical tanker fleet, relocated last summer its principle operating office to Cork City from the suburb of Mahon downriver.

Last month several key appointments were made by Ardmore to their offices in Singapore and Houston, USA.

Published in Waterfront Property

#CobhChristmasCall - A quartet of cruiseships will come to Cork Harbour this festive season, including one on Christmas Day, bringing 5,000 visitors to the region.

The increase writes the Evening Echo in winter cruiseships highlights a changing industry. Cork traditionally welcomes cruiseships into Cobh from April to October, and 58 vessels arrived this year.

The larger ocean liners are then redeployed to the Caribbean, the Meditteranean, or to the southern ocean around Australia. However, increased competition means vessels operated by UK and German cruise companies are continuing in northern Europe throughout the winter.

Earlier this week, the Bodicea called to Cobh and will be followed by the Balmoral, on Saturday, and the Marco Polo, on Monday. Then, on Christmas Day, Black Watch, operated by Fred Olsen Cruise Lines, will come to Cobh. The four vessels have a capacity of 5,600 passengers and crew.

For more from Captain Michael McCarthy, the commercial manager of the Port of Cork, click here.

Published in Cruise Liners

#PortSnapshot - Shipping movements in the Port of Cork have included in recent days a diverse range of vessels that are based and have visited the natural harbour, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Outlined below are vessels that Afloat.ie have tracked and their respective business activity.

Kinsale GasField Supply Support Ship: Ocean Spey a supply tug support vessel, newly introduced at the Kinsale Energy Ltd facility (formerly Marathon Oil) is currently operating offshore. The 66m vessel is reported to be registered in Ireland and is serving the pair of gas rig platforms located approximately 50kms off the south coast of Cork. Afloat will have more to report on Ocean Spey.

The vessel which also has anchor handling capabilities was built in 2000 and has a 1,864 gross tonnage. Meanwhile the main Kinsale Gasfield standby support ship, Pearl, operated by Cork based Mainport Group, (owners subsidiary Seahorse), is currently at the lay-by berth at Cork Dockyard, Rushbrooke near Cobh.

Brittany Ferries Flagship Service: Pont-Aven, Brittany Ferries flagship of 41,700 gross tonnage made her final Cork-Roscoff end of season sailing on Saturday.

In advance of the season the cruiseferry was fitted with 'scrubbers' to reduce harmful sulphur emissions (the only ferry in Irish waters with this 'green' technology as previously explained here).

The Ireland-France route began in 1978, the same year gas was first produced from the Kinsale Head area in the Celtic Sea. The 2,400 passenger/650 car ferry is to resume service in April, 2017.

Dutch Naval Submarine: A more unusual sight to Cork Harbour has been submarine HNLMS Bruinvis of the Royal Netherlands Navy (NATO member). The non-nuclear powered 68m submarine built during the Cold War is equipped with almost 40 torpedoes missiles.

The crew having paid a visit to Cork City for a long weekend departed yesterday using its diesel electric engines. 

Published in Cork Harbour

Every year the Port of Cork Company compiles a much sought after calendar of Port and harbour photos. Over the years the themes and designs have varied from old style maritime paintings, historic photos of the port demonstrating the ports history and Cork Harbour as a trade gateway, to photographs of today’s port, a modern dynamic and busy facilitator of imports and exports.

With so many trade and leisure visitors to our Port, every day is different and thanks to some keen photographers out there, much of this activity is captured in photographs and shared via social media.

The Port of Cork is now compiling the calendar for 2017 and is inviting photographers both amateur and professional, if interested to submit a photo. All photos should be port activity or Cork harbour related. Fourteen photographs will be selected for the calendar and photographers whose photos are chosen will receive a copy of the Port of Cork calendar and a credit within the calendar.

The calendar is printed and distributed compliments of the Port of Cork to port users and customers. Every year over 1000 calendars are distributed.

If you are interested in submitting a photograph (max 2 photos per submission) please send your images to Sara MacKeown [email protected] along with your name and contact details. All images must be landscape and high resolution Jpg format. Closing date for submissions 17th November.

Published in Port of Cork
Tagged under

After the inaugural success of the Howth Yacht Club 2016 Cruising Conference, the Irish Sailing Association is bringing the one day event to Cork Harbour at the Port of Cork Offices on Saturday, 18th February 2017.

Last year's conference featured a wide range of topics and featured on Afloat.ie here.

Published in Cruising
Tagged under

The Port of Cork Company (POCC) has announced the recent introduction of a new €750,000 automated gate operating system for its Tivoli Container Terminal. The new system will help support terminal efficiency and modernise the container collection and delivery process at the busy marine terminal and it is the first of its kind to be introduced in Ireland.

The Port have implemented an integrated IT access management system that will improve transactions for hauliers at the terminal gate. The new gate operating system replaces the former gate-in and gate-out procedure, which operated for many years at the terminal, and is the culmination of a five year objective. Included in the process was a joint collaboration between the Port of Cork and Customs & Revenue to establish a customs clearance verification system.

The new high-tech Gate Operating System will record important data for all deliveries and collections at the Terminal, including license plates, container details, container damages and security seal presence and utilizes modern technologies and industry practices observed at terminals operating in mainland Europe.

In the event of any difficulty, the new Gate Operating System contains a problem resolution area where any potential issues encountered by the haulier can be addressed prior to containers being delivered and/or collected. Only those trucks that have been processed correctly can enter the Container Terminal Gate and the Loading/Unloading area, which improves flow at the busy interface. The new Gate Check in Area is monitored by a central control station and can also assist hauliers as required.

Olan O’Keeffe, Terminal Operations Manager, Port of Cork, says, “Ports and terminals are dynamic environments with very specific needs and the Port of Cork Company prides itself on being at the forefront of the industry when it comes to adapting to change and in consistently achieving the highest operational standards”.

“The introduction of this modern Gate Operating System will assist in improving terminal turnaround times, increase our throughput capacity, improve efficiency, drive revenue, integrate with Customs systems and provide us with important management reporting data such as how many trucks visited the terminal during a particular day, week or month and how long trucks stayed at the terminal on average. Image recording will also assist us in claims management.”

He continued, “The introduction of the Gate Operating System at Tivoli will also contribute to the Port’s plans to develop its new facility at Ringaskiddy. As part of that proposal the Port has committed to implementing a Traffic Mobility Management plan in Ringaskiddy, and a fully automated gate system and vehicle booking system will form an important part of that Plan. The new system at Tivoli will provide us with valuable hands on experience of what such a facility can contribute to traffic mobility”.

The continued use of the Port’s online portal (portal.portofcork.ie) is recommended to hauliers to ensure containers are booked in, released and customs cleared, etc. Further developments are planned to improve information for transport operators through this portal, in order to communicate key information that will be required in relation to the availability of containers for customers.

Published in Port of Cork
Tagged under

The cruise ship industry is a huge and growing business …. The “ship hotel” as it has been dubbed. There is huge competition amongst the companies which own the ships and amongst the ports which want them to call. More, bigger cruise ships than ever have been and are being built, with ever-bigger passenger capacity. The Cruise Line International Association Europe said last year that the contribution of Cruise Ship Tourism to the economies of Europe was worth €40 billion and accounted for nearly 350,000 European jobs and that Europe was the second biggest market worldwide, after the United States.

Ireland has been attracting plenty of cruise ship business. Last year 193 vessels called to Irish ports - Dublin and Cork being the main locations, followed by Waterford, with Dun Laoghaire, Killybegs, Foynes and Bantry Bay also calling-locations. That number of ships was an increase of 16 and the number of passengers was close to 250,000 – an increase of almost 40,000 - on the previous year. As dictated by Government policy, the ports are in competition with each other and the cruise ship business is one of their primary targets, though port administrations say that local businesses and the economy generally benefits more than they do from calls by cruise ships.

With more ships being built, many with bigger-than-ever passenger capacity, is the best approach for Ireland that its ports should be competing with each other for the business?

That’s the question I have been discussing on THIS ISLAND NATION Podcast this week, with a man in a position to see both sides, Capt. Michael McCarthy is Cork Port’s Commercial Manager and also Chairman of Cruise Europe. I talked to him in Cobh, as the town celebrated its latest international award for the handling of cruise ships.

• Listen to the Podcast below: 

Published in Island Nation
Page 6 of 25

Fastnet Yacht Race 

This race is both a blue riband international yachting fixture and a biennial offshore pilgrimage that attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge. For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between. The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish is in Plymouth, Devon via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland.

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Plymouth.
  • The lighthouse first shone its light on New Year’s Day in 1854
    Fastnet Rock originally had six keepers (now unmanned), with four on the rock at a time with the other two on leave. Each man did four weeks on, two weeks off

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2020

Wave button for Afloat new dates

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

quantum sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating