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#Rowing: Ronan Byrne of Shandon Boat Club won the Cork Sculling Ladder time trial in an excellent time of six minutes 20.2 seconds today. Byrne had been the joint winner last year. Margaret Cremin of Lee Rowing Club was the fastest woman, in a time of 7:10.5.

One hundred and sixty six scullers competed in 44th time trial, sponsored by Hanley Calibration Ltd, over the 1800 metre course at the Marina. Some scullers competed twice: most sculled on the early incoming tide until nearly 11 am, helped by an easterly wind. Conditions early on were good, but once the tide changed they deteriorated and the ladder finished at 12 noon.

 Cremin, winner of the novice championship of Ireland this year, easily won from her clubmates, Willow Littlewood and Eimear Cummins.

 The 2015-2016 Cork Sculling Ladder continues with challenge races until the 28th March.  Scullers can join at any stage.

Cork Sculling Ladder, time trial (Selected Results) 

Men

1. Ronan Byrne (Shandon Boat Club) 6 mins 20.2 seconds,  2. Colm Hennessey (Shandon Boat Club) 6:23.1,  3. Jack Casey (UCC Rowing Club) 6:23.6, 4. Stephen O’Sullivan (Shandon Boat Club) 6:24.9,  5. Sean Lonergan (Shandon Boat Club) 2:27.5, 6. Darragh Larkin (Lee Rowing Club) 6:27.6.

Women

53. Margaret Cremin (Lee Rowing Club) 7:10.5,  67. Willow Littlewood (Lee Rowing Club) 7:26.5,  73. Eimear Cummins (Lee Rowing Club) 7:34.4,  74. Jennifer Crowley (Shandon Boat Club) 7:35.8.    

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Dave Neale was an impressive winner of the Tullamore Time Trial. The Offaly man, competing for Old Collegians, had almost nine seconds to spare over Queen’s University lightweight Chris Beck. Rebecca Edwards of Queen’s was the fastest woman over the course, while Claire Feerick of Neptune was the fastest junior woman.

Tullamore Time Trial, Saturday (Selected Results)

Men – Senior: D Neale 8 mins 19.5 seconds, 2 C Beck 8:28.3, 3 P Doyle 8:33.2. Junior 18: A O’Connor 8:50.5. Jun 16: O Clune 9:12.1. Jun 15: J Keating 9:19.0.

Women – Sen: R Edwards 9:33.3 (head three), 2 Edwards 9:40.0 (hd 4), 3 C Feerick 9:53.0. Jun 18: C Feerick 9:54.4. Jun 16: S Dooley 10.30.1. Jun 15: E Dowling 10:43.7.

 

RACENUMBERNAMECLUBGRADELAUNCH StartFinishTime
          
435Gorman AORCMJ 1213.21    
          
327Keogh ATCMJ 1411.25FIRST TO53:41.1201:03:35.0709:54.0
326Flynn LTCMJ 1411.25 53:09.4101:03:05.8109:56.4
328Hennessy BGNMMJ 1411.24LAUNCH54:13.6601:04:41.6710:28.0
119Gorman JORCMJ 147.59 41:03.2653:43.0212:39.8
          
110Keating JCWMJ 158.07 36:33.5245:52.5009:19.0
312Keating JCWMJ 1511.36 46:07.1900:55:34.5109:27.3
424Dempsey SGNMMJ 1513.24 41:34.6451:29.9809:55.3
426Moylan JGNMMJ 1513.23 43:05.3453:09.8410:04.5
423Bolger BGNMMJ 1513.24 40:56.6451:17.8510:21.2
315Sutton LNRMJ 1511.34 47:38.8700:58:29.6310:50.8
314McGrath MNRMJ 1511.35 47:13.9700:58:08.5310:54.6
313Becker JNRMJ 1511.35 46:43.6400:57:43.9711:00.3
233Sutton LNRMJ 159.19 51:46.3701:02:47.9311:01.6
232McGrath MNRMJ 159.19 51:23.1401:02:31.3011:08.2
231Becker JNRMJ 159.18LAUNCH50:53.2201:02:01.5711:08.4
425Gladney JGNMMJ 1513.23 42:13.4154:32.3812:19.0
118Mann CORCMJ 157.59 40:35.7354:26.5213:50.8
427Mann CORCMJ 1513.22    
336Brennan C (TO)ORCMJ 1511.29TIMING ONLY   
          
220Clune OTCMJ 169.26 45:18.4554:30.5509:12.1
310Harte SORCMJ 1611.36 45:06.3154:23.9009:17.6
18O'Brien RCWMJ 168.08 35:28.3944:50.7709:22.4
17Harte SORCMJ 168.08 35:09.8844:32.4809:22.6
221McKnight TTCMJ 169.26 45:53.4455:17.1409:23.7
224Quinn RTCMJ 169.23 46:51.2956:22.8809:31.6
222Gilheany DTCMJ 169.25 46:24.2155:59.9209:35.7
38Cuskelly DORCMJ 1611.38 44:39.4754:23.3609:43.9
19Cuskelly DORCMJ 168.07 35:58.2645:42.3209:44.1
37O'Brien RCWMJ 1611.38 44:11.2554:23.0010:11.8
416Duffy EGNMMJ 1613.27 35:55.4546:34.0610:38.6
226Cumming BORCMJ 169.21 47:25.6158:14.2810:48.7
418Cumming BORCMJ 1613.26 37:33.5448:27.9710:54.4
311McMahon J (TO)CoSMJ 1611.36TIMING ONLY45:40.0600:56:36.1310:56.1
223Chiltern NCoSMJ 169.24TIMING ONLY52:30.8801:03:39.5611:08.7
417O'Leary BGNMMJ 1613.27 36:38.9249:18.5712:39.7
225Early FCoSMJ 169.22TIMING ONLY59:50.0801:12:49.0112:58.9
39Irwin ATCMJ 1611.37    
          
214O Connor ACCMJ 189.29 43:21.9152:12.4008:50.5
14Nolan OCWMJ 188.09 34:21.8743:27.6909:05.8
33Nolan OCWMJ 1811.41 42:07.6300:51:15.1409:07.5
218Lennon AGNMMJ 189.27 44:49.6554:00.0309:10.4
212McKeonCCMJ 189.32 42:55.0452:06.4509:11.4
211Meehan NCCMJ 189.32 42:29.3451:45.0609:15.7
217EarleyCoSMJ 189.27 43:50.4153:06.4309:16.0
16Merkevicius DORCMJ 188.09 34:47.6744:15.8209:28.2
36Merkevicius DORCMJ 1811.39 43:47.1553:17.1609:30.0
35WhelanCoSMJ 18  43:18.2053:31.1310:12.9
13Byrne SCWMJ 188.12 45:10.2001:05:22.9220:12.7
26Munnelly PAthloneMJ 189.36    
215Duffy LGNMMJ 189.29    
216Kennedy SGNMMJ 189.29    
219Scully KGNMMJ 189.26    
34Byrne SCWMJ 1811.39    
          
247O BrienCWMM TO  49:21.7058:39.7309:18.0
227Hogan SORCMM(a)9.21 48:04.3457:29.6009:25.3
419Hogan SORCMM(a)13.26 38:12.1648:08.3009:56.1
228Hogan DORCMM(b)9.19 48:38.1358:47.7610:09.6
422Hogan DORCMM(b)13.25 40:08.2050:39.2210:31.0
420Murnane JOCMM(f)13.26    
421Dooley ACWMM(h)13.25 39:15.9050:00.8510:44.9
230O'Keeffe JTCMM(H)9.18FIRST TO50:10.7801:01:32.0311:21.3
330Kirby TOCMM(h)11.25 55:12.8501:08:38.6313:25.8
          
329McConigley CORCMN11.25 54:40.0401:05:22.4210:42.4
229McConigley CORCMN9.19    
335Raulynaitis RPTDNMN11.29 58:16.66DNF 
          
21Neale DOCMS9.39 38:16.7246:36.2608:19.5
43BeckCQUBBCMS13.35 26:33.2635:01.5708:28.3
25Doyle PQUBBCMS9.36 40:15.1548:48.3208:33.2
23Beck CQUBBCMS9.37 39:25.8147:59.1808:33.4
28Oliver TQUBBCMS9.35 41:11.2449:47.6108:36.4
46Oliver TQUBBCMS13.34 28:37.2537:15.4608:38.2
45Doyle PQUBBCMS13.34 27:47.6836:29.9908:42.3
41Neale DOCMS13.35 25:20.1134:04.8708:44.8
24Coughlan KCWMS9.37 39:55.6948:40.6108:44.9
27Whittle ECCMS9.35 40:43.2349:29.4708:46.2
44Coughlan KCWMS13.35 27:09.9935:58.4208:48.4
42McKeownPTDNMS13.35 25:57.4234:53.1708:55.7
22McKeown SPTDNMS9.39 38:46.9647:44.1808:57.2
47Crowley FKGNMS13.33 29:19.4738:24.3309:04.9
31Mozdzer ACCMS11.41 41:07.0450:15.8109:08.8
29CrowleyKGNMS9.35 41:40.2450:52.3809:12.1
48Laivins APTDNMS13.32 30:03.9439:25.1409:21.2
32Gannon AORCMS11.41 41:36.9500:50:59.5309:22.6
210Laivins APTDNMS9.33 42:06.6751:32.8709:26.2
12Gannon A.ORCMS8.12 34:07.5143:39.3809:31.9
11Hughes TUCDBCMS8.12 SCR  
          
246Connon JORCMTA  01:00:16.8101:19:47.1219:30.3
          
441Hannon GAthWJ 1213.27 51:44.0701:04:09.0512:25.0
          
121Tierney SNRWJ 147.57LAUNCH41:40.4952:46.8511:06.4
436Tierney SNRWJ 1413.22 48:30.8259:37.3711:06.5
244Scully SCWWJ 149.27 58:45.6601:09:53.0011:07.3
122Murphy AORCWJ 147.59 42:10.2253:19.4311:09.2
438Murphy AORCWJ 1413.23 49:48.8601:01:12.7211:23.9
124Slater DCWWJ 148.01 43:02.1154:38.2911:36.2
437Pendergast FNRWJ 1413.23 49:06.2901:00:55.6011:49.3
333Doyle Matthews ZCWWJ 1411.27 56:59.7601:09:04.9412:05.2
440Byrne ANRWJ 1413.26 51:02.6801:03:24.0312:21.4
125Pendergast FNRWJ 148.01 43:40.3256:11.8312:31.5
439Prendergast RNRWJ 1413.24 50:23.8301:02:59.9012:36.1
126Prendergast RNRWJ 148.02 44:08.0656:53.8012:45.7
245Pennick LORCWJ 149.28 59:10.8401:14:54.4915:43.7
123Byrne ANRWJ 147.59 42:35.60DNF 
          
431Dowling EORCWJ 1513.19FIRST TO46:18.7957:02.5210:43.7
243Dowling EORCWJ 159.26 57:59.4401:08:45.1310:45.7
242Coughan CORCWJ 159.26 57:40.0901:08:30.3510:50.3
432Coughlan CORCWJ 1513.19LAUNCH46:51.9057:49.7510:57.9
433Coughlan ANRWJ 1513.21 47:22.5458:31.5811:09.0
115Brown LNRWJ 158.04 39:23.1450:38.0611:14.9
430Brown LNRWJ 1513.21 45:36.0356:54.2911:18.3
429Scully SCWWJ 1513.21 44:54.8956:14.7311:19.8
116Coughlan ANRWJ 158.02 39:47.0351:13.4411:26.4
331Slater DCWWJ 1511.26 55:44.5501:07:40.2711:55.7
117Flanagain C.NRWJ 158.02 40:12.3252:37.4612:25.1
434Flanagain CNRWJ 1513.21 47:56.3201:00:51.5612:55.2
332Harris GGNMWJ 1511.26 56:25.5601:09:24.0312:58.5
          
320Dooley SGNMWJ 1611.29 50:26.4601:00:56.5510:30.1
322Duggan TCoSWJ 1611.28 51:44.1601:02:24.3910:40.2
240Duggan TCoSWJ 169.25 56:32.0601:07:17.0710:45.0
112McKeagney EORCWJ 168.06 37:16.0748:08.3910:52.3
238Dambrehte JORCWJ 169.23 55:13.0801:06:41.2511:28.2
114Carragher SORCWJ 168.04 38:49.4950:18.6711:29.2
113Doyle JNRWJ 168.04 37:39.9549:13.5611:33.6
428Carragher SORCWJ 1613.22 43:59.0055:46.6611:47.7
323Doyle JNRWJ 1611.27 52:16.5101:04:07.9711:51.5
239Tully ONRWJ 169.24 55:52.3501:08:17.1312:24.8
325Tully ONRWJ 1611.26 52:41.9201:05:16.4412:34.5
321Hennessy AGNMWJ 1611.29 51:08.1301:04:33.8513:25.7
237Murphy SNRWJ 169.22    
324Murphy SNRWJ 1611.26    
          
236Feerick CNEPWJ 189.22 54:27.8201:04:22.3409:54.5
415Mooney AORCWJ 1813.27 33:36.8343:34.5009:57.7
111Mooney AORCWJ 188.06 36:57.7147:03.0610:05.4
          
 42Nolan COrcWM  52:19.1701:04:30.6412:11.5
120Nolan CORCWM7.57FIRST TODNSDNF 
241Patterson JNRWM (b)9.25 57:00.7401:09:27.2312:26.5
334Patterson JNRWM(b)11.29 57:25.6001:09:16.0311:50.4
          
318Edwards RQLWS11.31 49:24.4800:58:57.7409:33.3
413Edwards RQULBCWS13.28 32:21.1642:01.1409:40.0
49Feerick CNEPWS13.32 30:47.2840:40.2509:53.0
316Kilkenny RCCWS11.33 48:13.7900:58:17.0310:03.2
414Maguire RQULBCWS13.28 33:02.1843:22.7210:20.5
319Maguire RQLWS11.31 49:54.4001:00:15.0410:20.6
412Brown RQULBCWS13.28 31:31.7341:52.5010:20.8
317Brown RQLWS11.31 48:44.3400:59:05.4910:21.1
410Martin APTDNWS13.31 34:16.9545:45.8011:28.9
234Martin APTDNWS9.21 53:18.8701:04:57.4411:38.6
235Narkeviciute APTDNWS9.21 53:54.9001:06:10.1112:15.2
411Narkeviciute APTDNWS13.29 34:49.8647:22.7612:32.9
Published in Rowing

#RowingIrelandAGM: Delegates at the annual general meeting of Rowing Ireland in Dublin passed all the motions put before it by the board. Rowers entering the Irish Championships must now have competed at two events in Ireland; those in the high performance system will only be allowed to compete as seniors in that year. Two new, unelected, officers can be added to the board. There were also more techncial changes: the tracker system will now be the officially accepted way to do draws; the 100-metre breakages rule has been removed: fixtures submissions submitted late can be allocated a date of its choosing by the Domestic Events Committee.

 At a meeting before the AGM, Morten Espersen, the Ireland high performance director, and Don McLachlan, the Ireland lead coach, made the case for changes in the domestic season which they believe would benefit the international programme.

 Awards at AGM of Rowing Ireland: Connacht: Peadar O hIci; Leinster: John O’Keeffe; Munster: Dermot Wall (RIP); Ulster: Iain Kennedy. Presidents’ Award: Robert Northridge.  

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

A crew of 20 rowers who set off to circumnavigate the island of Ireland – a round trip of almost 1000 nautical miles – in a self-built 15ft skiff to raise funds for Cystic Fibrosis Ireland (CFI) have today arrived home after a challenging four months at sea.

The team, comprising 20 rowers of mixed ability and experience, set off from Bray, Co. Wicklow on May 30th with crews of two oarsmen/women at a time rowing in relays. The rowers stopped at over 50 designated points along the coast before arriving home to a warm welcome from friends and family and members of the Bray community.

‘Row-A-Round Ireland’ is the brainchild of Bray-based maritime enthusiast Ger Crowley, who says the success of the trip was down to the dedicated crew of rowers and volunteers and the communities who came out to support the Row-A-Round Ireland team nationwide. 

“It’s was an ambitious project, a journey of almost 1000 nautical miles, but I am delighted to say we have arrived home today after completing the challenge safely. I’d like to take this time to thank each and every individual who provided support to this challenge whether it was by offering accommodation or providing invaluable local knowledge – we couldn’t have done it without the Irish people doing what they do best,” Crowley said.

“The other objective, of course, was to raise funds and awareness for Cystic Fibrosis Ireland. At the start of this initiative, we all decided upon a target we would like to hit, and while we have raised a huge amount so far, we are going to give it one last push over the next few weeks to hit that top note,” he said.

Their arrival was met with celebrations as the crew enjoyed a welcome home party on Bray Beach and Harbour with refreshments from Row-A-Round Ireland sponsor, Lyons Tea.

The team heavily relied on local community support along the way, with many members of the maritime community including rowing, sailing and diving clubs around the country providing support by offering food, accommodation as well as valuable advice and local knowledge.

Funds have been made as the boat rowed around the county, with all money going towards fighting Cystic Fibrosis, a fatal genetic disease that affects approximately one in 1600 births in Ireland, the country with the highest incidence of CF in the developed world.

To donate to Cystic Fibrosis Ireland simply text ROW4CF to 50300 to donate €4 or to get in touch with the crew in relation to the challenge visit www.rowaroundireland.com.

Published in Rowing

#rowingworldmasters – Ireland had an impressive set of wins at the World Masters Regatta, the four-day event which finished today in Hazewinkel in Belgium. There was a notable win in the men’s eight in the E category (average age 55 or more) where the Irish crew beat one of Russia’s best clubs, Dynamo Moscow, by less than a canvas - .31 of a second. The strokeman of the Russian crew, Vitali Eliseev, stroked the World Championship-winning four in 1981. The Irish crew was a composite of Old Collegians, Belfast Boat Club, Neptune, Waterford and Commercial. Denis Crowley – who was in the eight – won single sculls races in three different age categories. 

World Masters 2015

The Irish composite which beat Dynamo Moscow at the World Masters Regatta

World Masters Rowing Regatta, Hazewinkel, Belgium (Ireland Wins):

Men – Eight, E (Average 55 yrs or more): Old Collegians, Belfast BC, Neptune, Waterford, Commercial (John Hudson, Denis Crowley, Gerard Murphy, Michael Heavey, Colin Dickson, Colin Hunter, Francis O’Toole, Donal McGuinness, Al Penkert) 3 min 11.13 (1,000m)

Four, coxed, E (Average 55 yrs or more): Commercial, Belfast, Old Collegians, Waterford. Pair, E: Belfast BC. Pair, D (Avg 50+): Commercial. Pair, F (Avg 60+): Cappoquin.

Sculling – Double, F (Avg 60+): Carlow, Athlone. Single: B (36+), C (43+) and D (50+): Commercial (D Crowley). C (43+): Galway RC (S Heaney). 

Women – Sculling, Single, A (27+): Three Castles (B Quinn).

Published in Rowing

The best race of the World Rowing Championships in Aiguebelette was the men’s senior single sculls final. This pitted the favourite, Olympic champion Mahe Drysdale of New Zealand, against the 2014 world champion, Ondrej Synek of the Czech Republic, with double Olympic champion Olaf Tufte of Norway and Angel Fournier Rodriguez also contending. Lithuania’s Mindaugas Griskonis set the early pace only for Synek to take over. Drysdale rowed him down and passed him in the final quarter. Game over. But it wasn’t. From somewhere, Synek produced a closing burst. He gained purchase on Drysdale metre by metre and then passed him coming up to the bubbles on the line. A stunning win in a memorable race.
Griskonis was third and Tufte, who has qualified for his fifth Olympics, fourth.
Listen to Drysdale, Tufte and Fournier Rodriguez talk about the friendly rivalry in this most difficult of all disciplines in the run up to the World Championships.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

Hundreds of reusable plastic bottles are being distributed to participants in St Michael’s Rowing Club 2015 (SMRC) Urban Run on Sunday October 11th as part a campaign to encourage more people, particularly those engaged in outdoor pursuits and sports activities, to invest in a reusable bottle.

The Environment section of Limerick City and County Council, in conjunction with the Southern Waste Regional Office, is providing 500 participants in the event with the bottles.

Launching the SMRC Urban Run today (Monday, 7 September 2015), Cllr. Liam Galvin, Mayor of the City and County of Limerick, said: "I would like to congratulate St Michael's Rowing Club for opening their doors to celebrate health, community and the spirit of competition with the club’s third SMRC Urban Run. I also welcome the involvement of St Michael's Rowing Club's Urban Run in this project which encourages the use of reusable water bottles."

Antoinette Ahern, St. Michaels Rowing Club Captain stated: "The SMRC Urban Run is now in its 3rd year. We are delighted to assist with this reuse project. Water is hugely important for rowing, from respecting the Shannon and other rivers as the natural resource they are, to ensuring that our athletes are hydrated."

"Our rowers are encouraged to drink water every 15 minutes during training. We have a fresh drinking water tap that we refill bottles from. I would encourage all those involved in sports at a competitive and leisure to invest in a reusable bottle," added Ms. Ahern.

Sinead Mc Donnell, Environment Awareness Officer, Limerick City and County Council commented: "According to a recent article in The Guardian newspaper, globally we now drink as much bottled water as we do milk! Global sales are likely to exceed 233 billion litres in 2015. Over 90% of the cost of a water bottle can be traced back to the bottle, lid and label. You can save a lot of money and help the environment by investing in a multi use reusable water bottle and drinking tap water."

The reusable water bottle project is part of the Local Authority Prevention Network (LAPN), which is funded by the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) under the National Waste Prevention Programme.

"Plastic dominates the bottled water industry," explained Pauline McDonagh Southern Regional Waste Prevention Officer.

She added: "In production, most bottled water is packaged in PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottles which are derived from crude oil. It can take up to 3L of water to produce 1L of water. Transportation of bottled water around the world requires burning of fossil fuels. Although plastic bottles are recyclable, 20% or 14 million of all the drinks in plastic bottles sold in Ireland last year were not recycled instead they ended up in in landfill and take up to 1000 years to break down. When littered they are a blight on water, land and sea. If that wasn't enough bottled water is expensive.

Helen O Donnell, City Centre Tidy Towns said: "Projects which encourage us to reuse are very important in relation to the National Tidy Towns competition. This ‘Row Run Reuse’ project will definitely be a feature in the City Centre Tidy Towns application for 2016."

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Sanita Puspure came up just short of gaining Olympic qualification for the Ireland single scull in a tight finish of the B Final at the World Championships in Aiguebelette in France this morning. The Old Collegians woman carved out an impressive lead of just over a length after 500 metres and held it until the final quarter. Just three from this race would qualify boats for Rio, and the field caught Puspure coming up to the finish. On the line, Puspure took fifth, .66 of a second behind third-placed Magdalena Lobnig of Austria.

World Rowing Championships, Aiguebelette, France – Day Eight (Irish interest)

Men

Lightweight Four - B Final (Places 7 to 12): 3 Britain (2 P Chambers) 5:56.29.  

Single Sculls – B Final (Places 7 to 12):  2 Britain (A Campbell) 6:46.68

Women

Single Sculls – B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 Sweden 7:26.60, 2 Lithuania 7:27.30, 3 Austria 7:27.52; 4 Belarus 7:27.86, 5 Ireland (S Puspure) 7:28.18, 6 Zimbabwe 7:31.74.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland qualified two boats for the Olympic Games at the World Rowing Championships in Aigubebelette in France. The lightweight men’s and women’s doubles had to finish in the top 11 to qualify, which meant a place in the top five of their B Finals.

 The lightweight men’s crew of Paul and Gary O’Donovan took the final place. In a tense race, where the boats were tightly packed for much of the 2,000 metres, the O’Donovan’s sprinted to the line taking fifth just ahead of Greece – the margin was .28 of a second.

 In the women’s race which followed, Ireland’s Sinead Jennings and Claire Lambe carved out a clear lead in the second quarter and held it until the pack caught them coming towards the line. However, the Irish were determined not to miss their chance, and took third behind China and Poland. This placed them ninth in the world.  

World Rowing Championships, Aiguebelette, France – Day Seven (Irish interest)

Men

Lightweight Double Sculls – B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 Poland 6:20.25, 2 United States 6:20.55, 3 Austria 6:22.04, 4 Switzerland 6:22.34, 5 Ireland (P O’Donovan, G O’Donovan) 6:23.20; 6 Greece 6:23.48.

Women

Lightweight Double Sculls – B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 China 6:59.31, 2 Poland 7:00.37, 3 Ireland (C Lambe, S Jennings) 7:00.67, 4 Russia 7:00.79, 5 United States 7:02.21; 6 Sweden 7:02.45.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland’s women’s double and lightweight single sculler Denise Walsh finished their campaigns at the World Rowing Championships in Aiguebelette in France with good performances. Walsh took second in her C Final, 14th overall. She sprinted to the line and almost caught winner, Kate Johnstone of South Africa. Helen Hannigan and Lisa Dilleen won their D final, pushing Italy into second. The Ireland crew places 19th overall.

World Rowing Championships, Aiguebelette, France – Day Six (Irish interest)

Men

Lightweight Four – Semi-Final Two (First Three to A Final): 4

Britain (2 P Chambers) 6:58.68.  

Lightweight Pair – A Final: 1 Britain (J Cassells, S Scrimgeour) 6:29.40. B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 Ireland (M O’Donovan, S O’Driscoll) 6:46.44, 2 Spain 6:46.59, 3 Czech Republic 6:47.54.

Single Sculls – Semi-Final Two: 5 Britain (A Campbell) 6:51.24.

Women

Four – A Final: 1 United States 6:25.22, 2 Britain 6:31.52, 3 China 6:35.56; 5 Ireland (A Keogh, M Dukarska, L Kennedy, B O’Brien)  6:43.49.

Double Sculls – D Final (Places 19 to 24): 1 Ireland (H Hannigan, L Dilleen) 7:17.04, 2 Italy 7:18.38, 3 Ukraine 7:21.82.

Single Sculls – Semi-Final (First Three to A Final; rest to B Final): 1 China 7:24.41, 2 Czech Republic 7:26.48, 3 United States 7:27.39; 5 Ireland (S Puspure) 7:33.94.

Lightweight Single Sculls – C Final (Places 13 to 18): 1 South Africa 8:07.16, 2 Ireland (D Walsh) 8:07.96.

Published in Rowing
Page 11 of 75

The Rolex Fastnet Race - This biennial offshore pilgrimage attracts crews from all walks of life:- from aspiring sailors to professional crews; all ages and all professions. Some are racing for charity, others for a personal challenge. For the world's top professional sailors, it is a 'must-do' race. For some, it will be their first-ever race, and for others, something they have competed in for over 50 years! The race attracts the most diverse fleet of yachts, from beautiful classic yachts to some of the fastest racing machines on the planet – and everything in between.  The testing course passes eight famous landmarks along the route: The Needles, Portland Bill, Start Point, the Lizard, Land’s End, the Fastnet Rock, Bishop’s Rock off the Scillies and Plymouth breakwater (now Cherbourg for 2021 and 2023). After the start in Cowes, the fleet heads westward down The Solent, before exiting into the English Channel at Hurst Castle. The finish is in Plymouth, Devon via the Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland

  • The leg across the Celtic Sea to (and from) the Fastnet Rock is known to be unpredictable and challenging. The competitors are exposed to fast-moving Atlantic weather systems and the fleet often encounter tough conditions
  • Flawless decision-making, determination and total commitment are the essential requirements. Crews have to manage and anticipate the changing tidal and meteorological conditions imposed by the complex course
  • The symbol of the race is the Fastnet Rock, located off the southern coast of Ireland. Also known as the Teardrop of Ireland, the Rock marks an evocative turning point in the challenging race
  • Once sailors reach the Fastnet Rock, they are well over halfway to the finish in Plymouth. The lighthouse first shone its light on New Year’s Day in 1854
  • Fastnet Rock originally had six keepers (now unmanned), with four on the rock at a time with the other two on leave. Each man did four weeks on, two weeks off

At A Glance – Fastnet Race

  • The world's largest offshore yacht race
  • The biennial race is 605 nautical miles - Cowes, Fastnet Rock, Plymouth
  • A fleet of over 400 yachts regularly will take part
  • The international fleet is made up of over 26 countries
  • Multihull course record: 1 day, 8 hours, 48 minutes (2011, Banque Populaire V)
  • Monohull course record: 1 day, 18 hours, 39 minutes (2011, Volvo 70, Abu Dhabi)
  • Largest IRC Rated boat is the 100ft (30.48m) Scallywag 100 (HKG)
  • Some of the Smallest boats in the fleet are 30 footers
  • Rolex SA has been a longstanding sponsor of the race since 2001
  • The first race was in 1925 with 7 boats. The Royal Ocean Racing Club was set up as a result

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