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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Navigation

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that Jons Civil Engineering will be carrying out works on Carrick-on-Shannon bridge on Friday 7 and Monday 10 June.

Navigation will be restricted to one arch of the bridge and masters of vessels should proceed with additional caution in the area, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Tarmonbarry’s lifting bridge on the Shannon Navigaton has finally reopened after an extended closure for essential maintenance, Waterways Ireland has confirmed.

Diversions had been in place since early February when the bridge in Co Roscommon was closed for works that eventually required procuring specialist parts from abroad.

The news will come as a relief to southern Shannon boaters who say they have been prevented from participating in rallies in northern reaches due to the closure.

“This has had disastrous consequences for boating on the Shannon so far this season,” one boater told Afloat.ie in recent days. “To date [there has been] very little activity on Lough Ree as boats cannot get down from Carrick, etc, nor can the southern boats make it up north.”

Elsewhere on the inland waterways, Levitstown lifting bridge in Co Kildare on the Barrow Navigation has also reopened following maintenance works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and users of the Shannon Navigation that that the Spencer Harbour public jetty and amenity area, and the areas of Lough Allen immediately upstream and downstream of the harbour, will be closed from Monday 20 to Friday 24 May due to planned site preparation works for the construction of the new slipway.

The cross-border body of Ireland’s inland waterways regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in relation to this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels on the Shannon Navigation that water levels in all areas north of Lough Ree are now at Ordinary Summer Level.

Water levels on the Shannon Navigation south of Lough Ree are approaching Ordinary Summer Level.

Levels are expected to continue to lower in the coming weeks, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Masters of vessels, particularly those with deep drafts, are advised to navigate with additional caution and to remain within the navigation at all times.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland wishes advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the Office of Public Works’ hydrometric section is holding a water flow measurement regatta next Wednesday 15 May.

The event will take place from 8am to 3pm for a distance of 200 metres from the floating pontoon located at the Red Bridge on the River Inny near Ballymahon in Co Longford.

Masters of Vessels and users of the Inny River are requested to proceed with additional caution during the event, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that in-river works for the construction of a wastewater treatment plant outfall pipe will take place from Tuesday 7 May to Friday 7 June downstream of Killaloe/Ballina.

Two isolated danger buoys will mark the extremity of the in-river works which will extend from the Ballina side into the river for around 70 metres.

Masters of vessels are requested to proceed at slow speed (5 knots, no wash) with additional caution in the vicinity of the works and to follow the instructions of the safety boat crew.

Elsewhere, boaters on the Shannon-Erne Waterway are advised that the waterfront jetty in Leitrim village is now owned and managed by Waterways Ireland, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

This jetty is located upstream of the slipway on the northern side of the waterway. The Shannon Navigation Bye Laws apply to this jetty as of 17 April 2023.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the closure of Tarmonbarry Bridge will be extended until at least Monday 27 May.

This further delay is due to additional repair works requiring specialist components being manufactured and delivered from international suppliers.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says the parts required are essential to the safe operation of the bridge.

A diversion route remains available via the Camlin River with additional staff being deployed to Clondra Lock to aid vessel movements along the Camlin.

Waterways Ireland says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in relation to this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the Gaelforce Great River Swim will take place between Tarmonbarry and Ballyleague next month.

Around 500 swimmers will participate in the swim event in Lanesborough on Saturday 18 May.

The Shannon Navigation between Tarmonbarry lock and Ballyleague bridge will be closed on the day between 9am and 2pm. Tarmonbarry lock and Cloondara Canal lock will also be closed and vessels will be prohibited from proceeding upstream from Ballyleague bridge during thus time.

A series of large bright green and red buoys branded with Gaelforce will be positioned along the swim route on the evening of Friday 17 May and will be removed after the swim on Saturday 18 May, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon Navigation that the lifting bridge at Tarmonbarry in Co Roscommon will now reopen on Friday 3 May.

This extension of the bridge’s closure since February is a result of additional repair works required following a bridge strike.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it apologises for extending this closure “but the additional work is essential to ensure the bridge is safely operational in advance of the bank holiday weekend”.

A diversion route remains available via the Camlin River.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation that in-river works for the construction of the Killaloe Bypass upper bridge superstructure are progressing as planned and will continue until October 2024.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the bridge is being constructed around 1km downstream of the current Killaloe–Ballina bridge.

A buoyed navigational channel continues to be provided for 100 metres either side of the in-river works.

The following plant and equipment will be operating on or overhead the navigation during the upper bridge works:

  • 600t crawler crane set up on the east shore
  • Stabilising crane barge (30m x 23m x 1.88m)
  • 100t crawler crane
  • Tugboat/pusher boat
  • Dumb barge (23m x 9m) and mobile elevated work platforms
  • Safety boat
  • Landing pontoon and gangways

From next Tuesday 2 to Friday 19 April, the final steel girders will be lifted into position in the central spans of the bridge.

This is a heavy lift operation and deemed high-risk work, requiring calm waters for operation of mobile elevated work platforms (MEWP) on barges.

Masters of vessels are requested to proceed at slow speed (5 knots, no wash) with additional caution in the vicinity of the works, and to follow the instructions of the safety boat crew as there are hazards such as bridge piers, steel piles and mooring lines to navigate.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways thanks its customers for their cooperation in relation to these works.

Published in Inland Waterways
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About the Golden Globe Race

The Golden Globe Race is the original round the world yacht race. In 1968, while man was preparing to take his first steps on the moon, a mild mannered and modest young man was setting out on his own record breaking voyage of discovery. Off shore yacht racing changed forever with adventurers and sailors, inspired by Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, following in his pioneering wake. Nine men started the first solo non-stop sailing race around the World. Only one finished. History was made. Navigating with a sextant, paper charts and an accurate and reliable time piece, Sir Robin navigated around the world. In 2018, to celebrate 50 years since that first record breaking achievement, the Golden Globe Race was resurrected. It instantly caught the attention of the worlds media as well as adventures, captivated by the spirit and opportunity. The original race is back.

The Golden Globe Race: Stepping back to the golden age of solo sailing

Like the original Sunday Times event back in 1968/9, the 2018 Golden Globe Race was very simple. Depart Les Sables d'Olonne, France on July 1st 2018 and sail solo, non-stop around the world, via the five Great Capes and return to Les Sables d'Olonne. Entrants are limited to use the same type of yachts and equipment that were available to Robin Knox-Johnston in that first race. That means sailing without modern technology or benefit of satellite-based navigation aids.

Competitors must sail in production boats between 32ft and 36ft overall (9.75 10.97m) designed prior to 1988 and having a full-length keel with rudder attached to their trailing edge. These yachts will be heavily built, strong and steady, similar in concept to Robin's 32ft vessel Suhaili.

In contrast to the current professional world of elite ocean racing, this edition travels back to a time known as the 'Golden Age' of solo sailing. Suhaili was a slow and steady 32ft double-ended ketch based on a William Atkins ERIC design. She is heavily built of teak and carried no computers, GPS, satellite phone nor water-maker, and Robin completed the challenge without the aid of modern-day shore-based weather routing advice. He had only a wind-up chronometer and a barograph to face the world alone, and caught rainwater to survive, but was at one with the ocean, able to contemplate and absorb all that this epic voyage had to offer.

This anniversary edition of the Golden Globe Race is a celebration of the original event, the winner, his boat and that significant world-first achievement. Competitors in this race will be sailing simple boats using basic equipment to guarantee a satisfying and personal experience. The challenge is pure and very raw, placing the adventure ahead of winning at all costs. It is for 'those who dare', just as it was for Knox-Johnston.

They will be navigating with sextant on paper charts, without electronic instruments or autopilots. They will hand-write their logs and determine the weather for themselves.

Only occasionally will they talk to loved ones and the outside world when long-range high frequency and ham radios allow.

It is now possible to race a monohull solo around the world in under 80 days, but sailors entered in this race will spend around 300 days at sea, challenging themselves and each other. The 2018 Golden Globe Race was a fitting tribute to the first edition and it's winner, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston.

Background on Don McIntyre (61) Race Founder

Don is an inveterate sailor and recognised as one of Australia s greatest explorers. Passionate about all forms of adventure and inspiring others, his desire is to recreate the Golden Age of solo sailing. Don finished 2nd in class in the 1990-91 BOC Challenge solo around the world yacht race. In 2010, he led the 4-man Talisker Bounty Boat challenge to re-enact the Mutiny on the Bounty voyage from Tonga to West Timor, in a simil