Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: J109

After five races sailed and a discard applied at the ICRA National Championships at the Royal St. George Yacht Club, John Maybury is two races away from an impressive fourth win of the Class One title after another impressive day on Dublin Bay sees the Royal Irish Yacht Club skipper lead 18-boat class one by five nett points with three wins from five races.

As predicted, J109s continue their stranglehold of class one and are in the top three places. Second, on 10 points, is Howth Yacht Club's Storm skippered by Pat Kelly and one point behind in third overall is clubmate and ICRA Commodore Richard Colwell in the new Outrajeous campaign.

Current J109 National Champion Andrew Algeo sailing his brand new J99 is fourth overall. 

Three solid windward-leeward races, with beats of 1.1 nautical miles, were held today in shifting westerly breezes of 280 to 290 degrees that placed an emphasis on sailing the high tack and staying in the strongest pressure, upwind and down. The 10-14 knot breeze was heaviest in the morning with gust up to 20 knots over relatively flat seas. 

"It was very tight racing - again - and it was tough with 20 knots for all three races and good courses too," said Colwell.  "It's very close in our class, one mistake and you pay heavily - the way it should be!"

Results are here. The final two races are scheduled tomorrow from 11 am with breeze forecast to be westerly at eight knots on Dublin Bay

Class One start 2895With just seconds to the start gun, the Strangford Lough Ker 32 HiJacKer from Down Cruising Club wins the pin end of the 400 metre line Photo: Afloat

Storm J109 Kelly 2545Pat Kelly's Storm has moved up to second overall Photo: Afloat

Outrajeous 1892Richard Colwell in the new Outrajeous campaign is lying third overall Photo: Afloat

J99 J109 2747Andrew Algeo's J99 on port with Colwell's Outrajeous in today's windward-leeward races

Grand soleil Nieulargo 2550Kinsale's Grand Soleil Nieulargo was fourth in the third race to be 11th overall Photo: Afloat

Gringo 2060Dublin Bay local IMX38 Gringo (Tony Fox) from the National Yacht Club won race three and is sixth overall Photo: Afloat

Jelly Baby 2022Seventh-placed Jelly Baby (above) - Despite her advertised tactician being Olympic skiff campaigner Seafra Guilfoyle, the 49er crew was spotted otherwise engaged on Dublin Bay (below) Photos: Afloat

49er 1772

Read all the latest from the ICRA National Championships in one handy link here.

Published in J109
Tagged under

Kenneth Rumball and John White are taking the Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School’s popular ‘man overboard’ lecture to the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s London clubhouse this evening (Thursday 16 May).

On 29 June 2018, the J109 yacht Jedi started the Round Ireland Yacht Race — but little did her crew of eight know that just says later, at 1am on 2 July, crew member John White would be swept overboard south-west of the Blasket Islands.

After well received talks at Wicklow Sailing Club in January and the Royal Irish Yacht Club in February, Rumball and White are in London to tell the story of how Jedi’s crew dealt with the situation — and what lessons were learnt from the incident.

Tonight’s RORC talk from 7pm is free for members and £10 for non-members, with booking available online HERE. For dinner reservations following the presentation email [email protected] or call +44 (0)207 493 2248.

Published in INSS

In a very tightly contested weekend of racing White Mischief with Richard Goodbody helming came through in the last race to win the J109 Eastern Championships hosted by the National Yacht Club by a Class Association reporter.

The Saturday race was the DBSC Coastal Race which comprised in the main a series of long close reaches down and back to the Bray Outfall mark. Paul Barrington in Jalapeno and Brian Hall in Something Else managed to get clear early on while the rest of the fleet battled against Cruisers 0 and other Cruisers 1 for clear air with very few passing lanes. Jalapeno led the fleet home followed by Something Else with White Mischief next. Class Captain Andrew Craig said after the race that this format was clearly not appropriate for a One Design Championship and would be rethought for next year.

J109 Dublin start 3116J109s line up for the final race of the Eastern Championships on Sunday Photo: Afloat.ie

By contrast, Sunday presented Champagne conditions and PRO Con Murphy had the whole bay to set excellent windward/leeward courses in 12 - 18 knots. The first race was won by White Mischief followed by Jalapeno and the newest members of the class Richard Colwell and John Murphy in Outrageous. The next race was won by Andrew Craig in Chimaera followed again by Jalapeno and John Maybury in Joker 2. The Championship would be decided in the last race in a brisk 18 knots of wind. Japaleno on 3 points with a very strong discard was lead boat followed by White Mischief on 4 with Chimaera on 5 - only a win by White Mischief could deprive Jalapeno. Chimaera led around the first mark but spinnaker handling difficulties gave White Mischief an opportunity which she grabbed and went on the win the race and claim her first j109 One Design Championship beating Jalapeno on countback. Chimaera finished 3rd overall. The generous sponsorship of North Sails, Bushmills and Porterhouse meant that all competitors were rewarded for their efforts at the prize giving.

The J109 fleet will now fan out across the IRC scene with good representation at the Scottish Series at Tarbert, ICRAs, Dun Laoghaire - Dingle Race, Sovereigns and the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta and they will be hard to beat in the IRC classes.

The J109 Irish Championship will be held in the Royal Irish Yacht Club on Saturday and Sunday 5/6 October.

More photos from the championships here

Published in J109
Tagged under

Scottish RC35 champion Debbie Aitken's First 36.7 Animal has taken first blood of the season beating the Howth Yacht Club J109 Storm (Pat Kelly) at this weekend's two-day Kip Regatta on the Clyde.

As Afloat readers will know, the Storm crew who hail from Rush in North County Dublin opted to defend their 2018 Kip title instead of racing closer to home at the J109 Eastern Championships on Dublin Bay.

Animal took four wins to produce a convincing victory in the ten-boat fleet on four nett points with Kelly's Storm second on ten points, some five points clear of the Scottish J109 Blue Jay.

Full results are here.

Following the Royal Western Yacht Club hosted event, the next big event in the Irish Sea is, of course, the Scottish Series at Tarbert in a fortnight where a bigger than normal Irish fleet is expected.  Storm is also the Scottish Series RC35 class winner so will face Animal again in two weeks time.

Published in ICRA
Tagged under

After a mix of coastal and inshore races, Tim and Richard Goodbody's White Mischief of the Royal Irish lived up to her pre-championship billing as favourite and won the J109 Eastern title but only after a tie-break on Dublin Bay this afternoon. 

The ten boat fleet sailed three thrilling windward-leeward races today in a perfect 15-knot southerly breeze. It followed a DBSC coastal race on Saturday, results are here.

Second overall at the National Yacht Club hosted event was the Dun Laoghaire Club's own Jalapeno (P Barrington, W Despard and B O'Sullivan) 

Points were so close at the top of the fleet that third and fourth place was also separated by the tie break rule with Royal Irish's Andrew Craig Chimaera third and Brian Hall's Something Else fourth.

It was the first event for Richard Colwell and John Murphy in their new acquisition Outrajeous from Howth Yacht Club and they finished fifth.

J109 Dublin start 3116The Goodbody's White Mischief gets a good start at the committee boat end of the line to win the final race of the series Photo: Afloat.ie

Full results are below

J109 Yacht Dublin 3030Second overall - Jalapeno (P Barrington, W Despard and B O'Sullivan) Photo: Afloat.ie

Chimaera J109 Dublin downwind 2777Third overall - Chimaera (Andrew Craig) Photo: Afloat.ie

J109 Dublin start 3149Evenly matched after the start of race four - Dear Prudence (left), Outrajeous and overall winner White Mischief to weather Photo: Afloat.ie

J109 Yacht Dublin 2725Tight racing at the windward mark (above) and downwind (below) Photo: Afloat.ie

J109 Dublin downwind 2759

J109 Yacht Dublin 2919Above and below - it wasn't all plain sailing at the J109 Easterns Photo: Afloat.ie

J109 Yacht Dublin 3080

J109 dear Prudence 3022

2019 J109 Eastern Championships Results

SailNoClubHelmNameR1R2R3R4TotalNett
1242 RIYC R & T Goodbody 3.0 1.0 (11.0 DNF) 1.0 16.0 5.0
5109 NYC P Barrington, W Despard, B O Sullivan 1.0 2.0 2.0 (5.0) 10.0 5.0
2160 RIYC A Craig 4.0 4.0 1.0 (11.0 DNF) 20.0 9.0
29213 NYC B & J Hall 2.0 (7.0) 4.0 3.0 16.0 9.0
19109 HYC R Colwell & J Murphy (11.0 DNF) 3.0 6.0 2.0 22.0 11.0
1206 RIYC J Maybury 5.0 (8.0) 3.0 4.0 20.0 12.0
1543 HYC S Knowles (6.0) 6.0 5.0 6.0 23.0 17.0
1095 RORC/HYC/RIYC DP Partners 8.0 5.0 7.0 (11.0 DNF) 31.0 20.0
1383 NYC T,B,W, A & P Shanahan 7.0 9.0 (11.0 DNF) 11.0 DNC 38.0 27.0
1129 RIYC M Monaghan & J Kelly 9.0 (11.0 DNC) 11.0 DNC 11.0 DNC 42.0 31.0
Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

The J109 East Coast Championship this weekend at the National Yacht Club on Dublin Bay comprises a coastal race on Saturday and three windward/leeward races on Sunday under international race officer Con Murphy.

2018 winner Andrew Algeo has moved on to a J99 but there will still be a strong fleet in this very competitive class and you can expect top Dun Laoghaire boat, Tim Goodbody’s White Mischief from the Royal Irish is expected to lead the charge but look out also for Goodbody's clubmate and J109 class captain Andrew Craig’s Chimaera.

J109 White Mischief2 2591Tim Goodbody's White Mischief from the RIYC Photo: Afloat.ie

From the host club, the Hall father and son team in Something Else, and Paul Barrington’s team in Jalapeno will also be in the mix.

J109 Chimaera from RIYC 1958Andrew Craig's Chimaera from RIYC Photo: Afloat.ie

Offshore specialists, the Shanahans in Ruth, also from NYC, are likely to feature as leading contenders in the coastal race while the event will be the first outing for Richard Colwell and John Murphy in their new acquisition Outrajeous.

Something else J109 0283John and Brian Hall's Something Else from the National Yacht Club Photo: Afloat.ie

At the recent Howth spring warmer weekend, where Outrajeous came up against J109’s Storm and Indian in a three-race series, Outrajeous came out ahead of both. In that event, Class 2 was included with Class 1 and Nigel Biggs Half tonner, Checkmate won overall with Outrajeous second. Storm finished 4th and Indian 5th overall. results are here.

J109 Storm from Howth 1685Pat Kelly's Storm from Howth and Rush will not compete this weekend on Irish waters as the past champions are racing at Kip Regatta in Scotland Photo: Afloat.ie

North Sails Ireland, Bushmills and Porterhouse continue their generous support for the Irish J109 class.

J109 start 2353There will be three windward/leeward races on Sunday in the J109 Eastern Championships Photo: Afloat.ie

Published in National YC
Tagged under

J109 National Champion Andrew Algeo of the Royal Irish Yacht Club will have his first regatta in his new J99, Juggerknot II (IRL3990) at Spi Ouest Regatta, this Friday, and it looks like the fleet of 436 boats gathering at La Trinite Sur Mer, will be the biggest in six years.

A very interesting class IRC B line up means the Irish boat will meet stiff competition from the get-go. Afloat reported on the arrival of the new J99 into Dublin in January.

A J99 sistership will be also competing in La Trinite. Called J Lance 14 she is sailed by French pro–sailor Didier Le Moal, so there's going to be plenty of pacing opportunities for the new Irish marque that has a summer of Irish-based regattas awaiting her.  

Here is the full class line up at Spi-Ouest with boat types and TCCs also listed: 

IRC B - Spi Ouest

 ID.   Bateau Voile Skipper Club Bateau TCC
124   AD HOC FRA44058 Jf. Cheriaux C N LORIENT JPK 10.10 1.0010
211   ANAVEL FRA43914 H. Cardon Y C CARNAC JPK 10.10 1.0050
127   APLYSIA 3 43918 C. Faure   SUN FAST 3200 1.0000
146   CAVOK FRA53119 P. Gach Y C CROUESTY ARZON POGO 30 1.0450
149   CLIFDEN FRA44059 F. Jooris Y C TRINITE SUN FAST 3200 0.9950
199   CRESCENDO FRA39098 P. Sauzieres S N TRINITE S/MER JPK 10.10 1.0000
284   DELNIC FRA9210 B. Rousselin S N TRINITE S/MER JPK 10.10 1.0040
221   EDM SERVICE FRA39201 B. Daniels S R ROCHELAISES SUN FAST 3200 0.9940
355   ENEDIS FRA44737 J. Rigalleau SNSablais SUN FAST 3200 1.0000
332   EXETERA FRA21859 A. Rougeulle S N TRINITE S/MER X 36S 0.9990
181   FOGGY DEW FRA37310 N. Racine S N P H jpk 10.10 0.9990
135   HAKUNA MATATA 35914 Jf. Nouel C N PORNIC SUN FAST 3200 1.0000
158   HEY JUDE FRA9624 P. Girardin S N TRINITE S/MER J 120 1.0400
192   IOALLA FRA1382 G. Prietz/Y. Le Trequesser S N TRINITE S/MER X 382 1.0140
394   J LANCE 14 FRA53145 D. Le Moal S R ROCHELAISES J 99 2.0000
171   JACKPOT 9679 H. Mehu S N TRINITE S/MER J 109 1.0040
136   JIBOULIX 25577 Jb. Prot S N TRINITE S/MER X362S 1.0060
137   JUGGERKNOT 2 IRL3990 A. Algeo   J 99 1.0170
410   LEMANCELLO FRA43904 Fx. Mahon C N FERRET SUN FAST 3200 0.9930
138   LINGOBJECTS FRA9804 B. Le Marec S R ROCHELAISES OFCET 32 1.0120
139   MUSIX FRA43893 P. Baetz S N TRINITE S/MER J 122E 1.0430
183   PEN KOENT FRA53160 E. Le Men Y C VAL ANDRE FIRST 40.7 1.0410
141   RACING BEE 2 FRA43933 Lm. Dussere   JPK 10.80 1.0420
314   REALAX FRA21706 Jy. Le Goff S N TRINITE S/MER A 35 1.0210
421   TIGER 5 3303 M.Menesguen   MMW33 1.0070
125   TIP FRA39430 G. Pages YC LA GRANDE MOTTE SUN FAST 3600 1.0520
151   VALORIS&BENEFITS FRA43673 J. Bouic S R ROCHELAISES A 35


Didier's previous very successful boat was another J Lance, a J112e which won both the IRC Europeans and IRC Worlds last year. 

Other interesting boats in the class will be a J112e, Musik, a very well sailed Beneteau 40.7 Pen Koent, a number of A35s, a number of JPK 10.10s, Jpk 10.80s and Jeanneau sunfast 3200s.  These three last designs will perform well if the conditions turn out strong, but will not be great if conditions are light and the long range forecast looks light.

Algeo previewed his new J99 for Afloat in January here and he gave one of the reasons for downsizing to the newer but smaller J model as local crew availability. 

On board for Algeo's maiden sail in France as part of the Irish crew is North Sails Ireland's, Nigel Young.

The J99 type has been sailed recently under IRC at the Warsash Spring series and so far the IRC optimised J109s are still holding sway. Unfortunately, there won’t be many tricked up J109s at Spi Ouest to see how they go. Unlike the Warsash J99, both J99s that will be sailing in La Trinite will be using Symmetric Configurations (with spinnaker poles) as against the sprit asymmetric configuration of the Warsash J99.

From a Dublin Bay and also a national perspective, it will be interesting to see how she goes.

Symmetric v Asymmetric Spinnakers

Another J109 in Ireland, the new Outrageous of Richard Colwell and John Murphy launches this week complete with a symmetric configuration, with the ability to change to asymmetric, if she wishes. Pat Kelly's J109 Celtic Cup champion Storm changed over to symmetric in 2017 too with well-documented success in the Scottish Series. The all-conquering J112e, J Lance, mentioned above, is also a symmetric setup.  

Storm Symmetric(Above) Howth J109 Storm sailing to success in the 2017 Scottish Series with an 'experimental' symmetric kite Photo: Mark Turner and (below) Storm using an asymmetric at last year's Irish Nationals on home waters Photo: Afloat.ie

Storm Assymetic 2782

Generally, it is thought that windward leeward events, especially in medium to strong winds suit boats with poles, whereas offshore likely would suit sprit boats.

Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club
Tagged under

It was while crossing the Atlantic on the Sail Training Brigantine Asgard II during a celestial navigation module of his Naval Service education in 1999 that Barry Byrne had something of an epiphany writes W M Nixon. He’d been introduced to sailing through the welcoming approach of Wicklow Sailing Club in his home town. This led on to joining the Naval Service after he left school.

The thought of transferring to the Army had arisen. Yet it took a long voyage on Asgard II to make the decision for him. His enjoyment of it gave him back his love of sailing and he considered that maybe a career at sea might not be conducive to continuing sailing as a sport.

Thus he changed course, transferring to the Army and a successful career in which he has specialized in technology and served with the UN in peacekeeping missions throughout the world, rising to the rank of Commandant.

In sailing, Barry and his team in the 704-mile Volvo Round Ireland Race 2018 won the Corinthian Class and placed second overall, and then went on to successfully defend the highly competitive Beaufort Cup in Cork Week just two weeks later.

shea and barry byrne2Barry Byrne (right) with his father Shea at Wicklow Sailing Club’s celebration of becoming Mitsubishi Motors “Sailing Club of the Year” 2017. Barry’s captaining of the team which won the inaugural Beaufort Cup in 2016 played a key role in Wicklow SC’s year of achievement. Photo: Angela Higgins

Currently doing an intensive Masters degree in Leadership and Management in the military Staff College at The Curragh, he reflects on how military principles served his team well during last year’s sailing campaign.

While many top sailors achieve success by using proven business administration and motivational means, Commandant Byrne shares the ways in which the success of the J/109 Joker II and her crew might stand up to classic military analysis. He sets the scene:

“Half of the team that competed in the Round Ireland (June 30th) and Cork Week/Beaufort Cup (starting July 16th) had never sailed together before. Like many of us, I had just returned from overseas service with the United Nations in February. We had very little time to put together a campaign aimed at winning two of Ireland’s premier competitions. For this, we used military principles.

Plans are nothing, but planning is everything

General Dwight D Eisenhower is credited with this statement. The point here is that no plan survives first contact with the enemy (or the West Coast of Ireland in a rugged mood). But if you have been through an effective planning process, it will stand to you. We used the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP) and Mission Analysis, essentially breaking down the mission ahead of us by factor, deduction and task. This helped in allocating clear areas of responsibility and job ownership in a short timeframe.

misson analysis3It may seem a long way from racing the Atlantic, but a proper Mission Analysis beforehand set the time-limited preparations on the right trac

SMART Goals

The first event was the Volvo Round Ireland, and we set ourselves the goal of winning the inaugural Halpin Trophy, the armed forces trophy introduced by Wicklow Sailing Club. We would be up against international military teams, most notably the semi-professional British Soldier team who had their own race yacht, the X41 British Soldier, which went on to win the RORC annual series. We used the principle of SMART goals, with which many readers will be familiar (Editors' Note: SMART is Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Timely). This was an ambitious target, but we assessed it as achievable and it focused our efforts.

Weapon of Choice

There is no point assembling a team if you do not have the tools for the job, and thanks to John Maybury, we had our weapon of choice; the seasoned and very successful J109 Joker 2. John is himself an inspirational leader. He is very supportive of the Defence Forces, indeed some of his own crew of longtime friends have enduring connections to the three services.

Focused Training

The training we completed on Joker2 in such a short time had to be very specific. Every training session had a clearly defined goal and timeframe, and we conducted After Action Reviews following every session. We also enlisted the help of a professional coach, Mark Mansfield, who gave our training focus and direction and was a valuable source of knowledge on J109 rig set up. Mark’s experienced insights on the Cork coastal area were particularly helpful in the Beaufort Cup.

mark mansfield4Mark Mansfield in racing mode. The former Olympic sailor and all-Ireland champion provided valuable insights for the Defence Forces’ crew in intensive training and rig-tuning sessions

Logistics

Much of the preparation involved getting the boat ready. Getting to the start line of a challenging Cat 3 Offshore Race is a marathon in itself. The safety regulations your boat must pass and the training - such as sea survival - is substantial. Clearly defined areas of responsibility (which emerged from our mission analysis) were key.

One secret weapon we had was Flight Sergeant Adrian Mulligan, an aircraft technician who led much of the boat preparation, particularly regarding instruments. Unfortunately, Adrian suffered a back injury prior to the race. Exemplifying the Defence Forces values of loyalty and selflessness, instead of dropping off the campaign completely, he actually increased his contribution shoreside to compensate for being unable to sail.

military ration packs5One of the pre-race preparation areas given special attention was nutrition, food and water. The Military Ration Packs may not be some people’s idea of haute cuisine, but they were exactly what was needed.

He brought another technical member of our race crew, Captain Wietse Buwalda, up to speed with all the instrumentation and power systems on the boat. This was later to prove vital in our success on the water. Other areas we focused on were nutrition, food and water. We had exactly the right amount of high energy military ration pack food, with Sergeant Paddy McGrath and Lt Richie O’Hagan leading the charge here.

Mission command 

Another military principle is mission command. You pick the right person for a job and tell them what needs to be done, but not how to do it. A good friend, Captain Mick Liddy, was my navigator just as I had been his navigator on the last Round Ireland we did together. My brief to Mick was to win the Round Ireland… beyond this, I didn’t second guess him.

Mick Liddy trimming 4279While every crewmember had a primary role, they also took on many other tasks – here, navigator Mick Liddy is on trimming duties shortly after the start.

round ireland downwind7When the going was good. As seen from one of the French competitors, although the sun may not be shining, Joker II is making excellent progress along the south coast.

When we were off the West Coast in those extremely strong and very persistent north to northeast winds which kick up seas of special viciousness, we were way, way, further West than any other team on the racecourse. Joker 2 was enduring the worst of the weather in the hope of being first to find a suggested slight backing of the breeze. It has to be admitted my resolve was tested, but I’m glad to say I managed to keep my mouth shut. A team in the most recent Volvo Ocean Race fell foul of this inter-personal hazard, with the skipper and navigator second-guessing each other, which ultimately led to an overall slowing down and a harsh lesson for themselves and other offshore campaigners.

fastnet rounding8Joker II reaches the Fastnet Rock – the sky may still be blue, but those ominous cloud streaks to the west hint at the fierce headwinds in prospect

Values

Our rough-and-then-some experiences far out to the westward further tested other areas of character.

The Defence Forces core values are Respect, Loyalty, Selflessness, Physical Courage, Moral Courage and Integrity. I saw all of these when things got difficult on the West Coast. Due to a sudden diesel leak and the violent conditions, the interior of the boat had become a hellhole and the cause of seasickness among those who had never succumbed before.

Far from strengthening and sustaining ourselves with all those carefully-selected rations, the team could not even keep water down without vomiting, yet everyone dug deep. Mick and I bailed the diesel out of the bilge with a rag and bucket while the boat was slamming into 35 knots of wind. We trusted the team to run the show while the skipper and nav were down there for several hours. My routine was to fill a bucket of sea-watery diesel, empty it over the side, vomit, go back down and fill another bucket. Every member of the crew was a leader that day. Everyone stayed on the rail. Even at 3 am, team members who had not eaten in 30 hours and were continually being drenched to the core with ice cold Atlantic waves, were volunteering to rotate to the bow. 

jokerII round ireland route9Most crews go off in the Round Ireland Race expecting a fast run down the west coast. But for 2018’s Race, the Atlantic was in a vicious mood with strong to gale northerlies, and Joker II went far to the west in the hope of finding a backing of the breeze suggested by some forecasts. It was a tactic by which they neither gained nor lost, but up off Donegal as the wind slackened, they made some good choices which put them well into the hunt.

It was a brutal two nights. Just a few miles from us, a crew had rescued one of their team who had gone overboard in pitch black horrific conditions. (Editor’s Note: In the stream of information coming through from the Round Ireland fleet, the J/109 Jedi, skippered by Michael Boyd with Kenneth Rumball of Irish National Sailing School as first mate, tersely reported an MOB situation. But very quickly, they followed it with a brief message to the effect that the man overboard was retrieved, there were no injuries, and they were immediately resuming the race. This calm approach was so redolent of the best traditions of offshore racing that the incident became just one of many in a tough race. But happily at the RORC Annual Prize Giving in London in November, that briefly-recorded achievement in the Atlantic received the special recognition it deserved, with Michael Boyd and Kenneth Rumball being awarded the RORC’s Seamanship Trophy).

Barry Byrne continues: While this kind of offshore sailing may sound grim, even dangerous, it is precisely why we do adventurous training in the military; to test leaders at all levels.

My dad always says there are no atheists in a foxhole. I don’t think there was an atheist on Joker 2 that night either. Not when we were in the thick of it, nor when we eventually converged with the fleet off northwest Mayo and checked to see where we had ended up in the rankings. Once we’d crossed Donegal Bay, our navigator continued to resist the temptation to hug the coast, and we were looking good approaching Tory Island.

The Final Stages

When the wind eventually eased, it did the worst possible thing - it died completely. Teams were left in tortuous drifting conditions off the North Coast of Ireland where tides would frequently send you backwards at five knots if local seabed conditions or sheer depth of water prevented kedging.

During this particularly trying time, our electronic instruments died completely, thanks to having taken such a hammering off the West Coast. But Captain Wietse Buwalda, a communications officer, who - as mentioned already - had closely studied the electronic systems with Flight Sergeant Adrian Mulligan prior to the race, effectively rebuilt the system in about four hours of relentless work.

jokerII good progress10When it all started to come right – having finally escaped from the North Coast, Joker II makes good progress down the Irish Sea

As all this went on, a minke whale followed our boat for about 24 hours. I’m not sure if we were delirious with tiredness, but superstition got the better of us, and we took to sacrificing our tastiest treats from our ration packs to Minkie in the hope he would send some wind…

jokerII near finish11One of the most difficult stages was the final 15 miles, with the wind drawing ahead and total concentration needed to get the best out of the boat

And - eventually – he did. We escaped the North Coast with a great spin down the East Coast in twenty knots of favourable breeze. But about fifteen miles from the finish line, we encountered yet more drifting conditions and a nail-biting finish after five days of nonstop racing and minimal sleep. Finally, we got there. The legendary welcome in the wonderful Wicklow Sailing Club was everything I had remembered in previous races.

The fact that we collected the Halpin Trophy meant Mission Accomplished, so it was icing on the cake to get first in the Corinthian Division, first Irish boat and place second overall, in all coming first in four divisions of the 56-strong international fleet of the Volvo Round Ireland Race 2018.

round ireland result12Military principles and values achieve the desired result

wicklow prize giving13Prize-giving for Joker 2 at Wicklow at the conclusion of the Volvo Round Ireland Race with (back row, left to right) Hal Fitzgerald (Race Director), Denise Cummins (Commodore Wicklow SC), Commandant Barry Byrne, Lt. Alexander Rumball, Capt. Wietse Buwalda and David Thomas of Volvo Car Ireland. Front row (l to r) Cdr Brian Mathews (Commodore Defence Forces SC), Ens. Marcus Ryan, Sgt. Patrick McGrath, and Capt Mick Liddy (Rtd).

Beaufort Cup

It was a hectic turnaround to get the boat ready for the Beaufort Cup in Cork just two weeks later. This was made even busier as I am involved with running the series itself and liaising with all the visiting teams. This was the second iteration of the event, and it was a huge success, involving 160 competitors and 30 Defence Forces sailors, making up 16 teams including the US Marines, UK armed forces and Irish emergency services teams including national champions and Olympians, with eight of the 16 boats being highly competitive J109s.

Central to the Beaufort race programme is the short offshore to the Fastnet Rock, a scenic 24-hour drag race down and back. We didn’t manage to get the lead until the last three hours. Until then, we had been schooled from ahead at different times by Simon Coveney, Stefan Hyde, Youen Jacob, Peter O’Leary and Fastnet expert Tim Goodbody.

However, we’d had a solid night race and our navigator Comdt. Ian Travers made a good decision to split from the pack and go offshore for breeze in the final miles. It was a winning move. My brother Teddy had raced with us for this offshore, and it was a great moment crossing the finish line.

beaufort fastnet finish14After a spot-on tactical call over the final few miles. Joker 2 sweeps across the lines to win the Fastnet Race in the Beaufort Cup series in Volvo Cork Week.

The rest of the week was a tough battle, particularly the last race when we were over the start line and had to go back and re-cross the line in a double points race. But yet again, in adversity true teamwork came into its own. Huge performances were put in by the whole team, notably Ensign Marcus Ryan and Louis Malloy sailing a flawless race to get us back into the fifth position we needed to secure overall victory in the event.”

A €10,000 prize goes to the winning Beaufort Cup team, and we gave €5,000 of this to Crumlin Children’s Hospital in Dublin, while the other €5,000 went to the RNLI, something special for us as the Baltimore RNLI crew skippered by Youen Jacob had run us a very close second in the overall series in Cork.

In summary, military tools for campaign planning combined with values of teamwork and resilience stood to the Defence Forces sailing team throughout last year’s ambitious campaign”.

beaufort prizegiving15Mission accomplished. Joker II’s team with the Beaufort Cup include (left to right) Cpl. Brian Phelan (Rtd), Louis Malloy, Ens. Marcus Ryan, Commandant Barry Byrne, Malcolm Moir, Capt. Ian Travers (Rtd), David Thomas of Volvo Car Ireland, Lt. Richie O’Hagan, and Sgt Patrick McGrath

Published in Navy

The Irish Championship winning J109 Juggerknot campaigned so successfully last season by Andrew Algeo of the Royal Irish Yacht Club on Dublin Bay is up for sale.

The boat is offered for sale at €99,000 Tax Paid or US$ 114,355

Juggerknot has had two owners from new and has benefited from extensive updates and additions in her current ownership throughout 2017 and 2018.

As previously reported by Afloat.ie, results last season include the Irish J/109 National championship title 2018, Wave Regatta Howth 2018 1st overall IRC1, Irish J/109 Easterns Champions, local club regatta and club racing wins.  

According to a brokerage advert posted online here, "the boat presents a great opportunity to own a young and well maintained J/109 with proven success on the race circuit and a very substantial and fresh suit of sails".

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

On the 29th of June 2018, Jedi, the highly competitive J109, started the Round Ireland Yacht Race in stunning sunshine and a fresh northerly breeze propelling her down the East coast of Ireland.

Little did her seasoned crew comprising of Michael Boyd (Skipper), Kenneth Rumball, James Gunn, John White, Philip Connor, Lorcan Tighe, Kylie McMillan and Diarmud McLaughlin would have in store for them some days later.

At 1 am on the 2nd of July 2018 just South West of the Blasket Islands, well reefed down in 30-35kts of a Northerly breeze, crew member John White was swept overboard.

"Crew member John White was swept overboard"

You can hear the story of how Jedi’s crew dealt with the situation and successfully recovered John back on board within minutes and most importantly the lessons learnt from the incident.

Kenneth, John and members of the crew will be giving two talks and all are welcome, with each club offering donations to different charities.

  • Wicklow Sailing Club 1930hrs on the 12th January 2018 donations to Wicklow Hospice, food and refreshments available from 1830hrs.
  • Royal Irish Yacht Club 1930hrs on 7th of February with Sailing Supper Afterwards, bookings with [email protected]
Published in INSS
Page 1 of 7

The Round Ireland Yacht Race is Ireland's classic offshore yacht race that starts from Wicklow Sailing Club (WSC) and is organised jointly with the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) and the Royal Irish Yacht Club (RIYC). This page details the very latest updates from the 2008 race onwards including the race schedule, yacht entries and the all-important race updates from around the 704-mile course. Keep up to date with the Round Ireland Yacht Race here on this one handy page.

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

mgm sidebutton
bjmarine sidebutton
xyachts sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events

tokyo sidebutton
sovscup sidebutton
vdlr sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
viking sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating