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“Momentum behind this innovative and exhilarating dinghy is building in Ireland, and opportunities to engage a wide range of dinghy sailors cannot be overlooked”. Irish RS dealer Kenneth Rumball, is sure in his assessment of what the RS Aero can do for sailing in Ireland.

What makes the Aero such a good fit for the sailor?

The design philosophy for the Aero was to prioritise ultra-light weight, performance and practicality in producing a dinghy for suit sailors between 35 and 100kg. Weighing about the same as an Optimist, and with a variety of rig sizes, you’re sure to have fun afloat, no matter the wind strength. The lightweight design allows for easy transport to and from the water, and even onto the roof of a car, and places the aero as the perfect dinghy for kids, women and men.

The Aero was designed as a hiking boat from the outset. Dun Laoghaire Aero sailors attest to the comfort when sailing – you may not even need hiking pads! This comfort extends to tacks and gybes, with a high boom removing the need to stoop very low when crossing the boat. The Aero has been developed with lessons learnt from previous successful designs, such as improved ergonomics, centre mainsheet system and foils that slot with precision into their cases

Owners will benefit from the unrivalled RS dealer back up and support for spares. Up to 100 shipments leave RS Sailing’s HQ daily, heading all around the world, with excellent freight cost efficiency.

Worldwide numbers of boats are growing rapidly, and event programmes are building quickly, with World Championships being held annually since 2017. While the Aero was not successful at the recent World Sailing Olympic equipment selection process, it did receive the highest score in the One-Person Olympic Equipment Evaluation Report, unanimously considered the best option by the wide range of experts involved. RS Sailing have worked tirelessly to provide an unrivalled international support network for the class, and coupled with the ethos of RS sailing, it would be very foolish to write off the prospects of seeing the Aero one day at the Olympics.

Dynamic three rig system

Key to this broad appeal is the dynamic three rig system. The RS Aero 5, RS Aero 7 and RS Aero 9 rigs cater for a 35-100kg weight range. Using common top sections and booms, but differing bottom sections, these rigs options have been designed with sufficient control to totally flatten and twist the head of the sail upwind reducing the healing moment. This allows a greater sail area to be carried – a big benefit downwind and in lighter conditions. The tracked mast and halyard allow for easy mast stepping, especially in big breeze.

Why the RS Aero is perfect for Dublin Bay

When most of us get to sail there rarely is enough wind to propel foiling boats, and the Aero with is lightweight construction allows for an exhilarating sail in all wind conditions. If foiling takes your fancy, the lightweight full design allows for many non-RS approved, but thoroughly usable, foiling kits available.

With 4 boats now sailing in the DMYC Frostbite Series, the class is growing rapidly. Coupling this with the scheduled RS Aero Irish Open, there never has been a better time to get afloat in an Aero!

The Irish RS Dealer, Irish National Marine Services, is working in conjunction with RS Sailing to offer a special price for the first four additional boats brought into the country. If you’re still not convinced, a demo sail can be organised.

RS Aero Irish Open – 2nd and 3rd May 2020

The RS Aero Irish Open takes place on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd May 2020. The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School will host the inaugural event from Dun Laoghaire harbour with racing on Dublin Bay.

RS Sailing will support the event with a charter fleet and there is already good interest from RS Aero sailors in both the north and south of the UK. Added to the emerging Irish RS Aero fleet we should be in for a fabulous first event in Ireland!

The early event page is here which shall evolve as more informative and online entry is launched in due course.

Contact:

  •  Irish National Marine Services: marineservices.ie
  • Telephone Kenneth Rumball: 086 407 4275

What are Irish RS Aero owners saying?

Brendan Foley on why he chose the Aero over other options

After racing big boats for 20 years when I wanted to get back into dinghies, I wanted a boat that would be; fun, fast, easy (for a 43 year old!) and challenging enough to push me too. Foiling looked cool but I didn’t fancy flip flopping from wing to wing in light weather. The more traditional single handers of my youth felt a bit dated. The RS Aero was intriguing as you get sailing in all conditions plus the option of foiling. After sailing the boat, I was hooked by the simplicity and the windsurfer like acceleration. The square top main and carbon rig is super responsive, and the lightness of the hull and its shape make hiking bearable! - Brendan

Paul McMahon – RS Aero Owner details what a new sailor can expect from the class

I have been lucky enough to race the RS Aero in four events over the last few years, each time I was able to avail of RS Sailing’s generous charter scheme (their shore side support at the events is also second to none).

My first impressions of the boat were extremely positive. Cockpit layout is well thought out, outhaul and cunningham very close to your forward hand for easy adjustment – and my favourite the water bottle holder at the back!

I remember thinking that it was in effect a modern laser, it’s not! It is a very different boat, one that needs to be sailed to understood. The boat is really rewarding to sail, upwind, it responds well to body movement and sail control. Reaching, it has a bit of get up and go, she planes easily. Downwind, she responds well to changes in angles and gusts – Loads of gains to be made on the runs with good positioning and technique.

After my first sail in the Aero, I was hooked, the purchase decision was made. It took a little longer to persuade my partner – not much to be fair.  Racing in the class is very competitive, but there is a good spread of abilities – so wherever you end up in the fleet there will be close racing. The top sailors in the class are extremely generous in sharing their knowledge, so you can quickly get up to speed. This also makes the class a good class for the first steps into dinghy racing.

Peter Barton (probably the fasted Aero sailor about) will often give a detailed introduction to the boat along with go-fast tips – similar to below;

Any of the Aero sailors are happy to help and offer useful bits of advice when needed.

I’m really looking forward to the first real Aero Class racing event in Ireland, without a doubt the boat is going to appeal to dinghy racers in the country. Early interest from the Irish dinghy sailors is strong and it will be a great opportunity to show any travelling U.K boats some Irish hospitality. - Paul

Published in Dublin Bay
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What is the Irish National Sailing School at Dun Laoghaire Harbour up to now? The answer to that question is: "We're off to film Iceland", School Principal Alistair Rumball told Afloat as his film services division was packed on to trailers this week.

The intrepid Dublin sailing school and film services company have a much sought after marine expertise and that means the INSS crew are often travelling far and wide with plenty of equipment including RIBS, trailers and props such as Viking ships.

Rumball wouldn't be drawn on the name of the next blockbuster, such is the level of confidentiality on these matters, but he did tell Afloat the INSS is heading to Reykjavik on a special assignment. 

Rumball has developed a busy marine services division for film and television, with titles such as “Saving Private Ryan”, “Robin Hood”, “PS I Love You” and “The Guard” part of the INSS show reel.

INSS trailerThe INSS trailer

The largest and most recent project was the TV series “Vikings” filmed in Ireland at locations including Lugala, Loch Dan and off Wicklow head. Alistair not only provides marine co-ordination for up to 200 cast and crew on the water but also organises all the logistics of getting countless craft, including 50ft Viking Ships, onto location.

Check out a few of the videos for a flavour of this work here

Published in INSS

Last weekend over 60 international skippers and boaters were welcomed to the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School at Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The West Pier venue hosted Quarterdeck Academy’s annual Skipper and Host Regatta, which saw close, lively and enjoyable racing from Dun Laoghaire aboard twelve 1720s. Crews comprised people from all over the globe, with the many European countries, the United States, Canada and South Africa particularly well represented.

Racing commenced on Sunday morning and Race Officer Kenneth Rumball got five races in for the day. Racing was facilitated by teamwork from a variety of Dun Laoghaire sailing establishments, with INSS boats, joined by RIYC and RSGYC fleets. This close cooperation happens every week of the Summer months, and it is a testament to all these organisations committed to facilitating participation on the bay.

Check out a video of the racing action…

Monday’s programme was lost to 35-40 knot gusts, however, the international guests more used to Sunnier climes of Croatia, Greece and the British Virgin Island took to the water to experience and Irish Sea South Easterly in the school’s fleet of large passenger RIBs.

Chief Instructor Kenneth Rumball was thrilled to see so many familiar faces, both former instructors in the school now making a living in the marine industry as well as graduates of the school’s yachting courses. “The weekend was particularly rewarding, seeing skills and training put to use. This is what the school is all about, allowing people to live out their boating dreams”.

In total, over 100 Quarterdeck Academy members spent a long weekend in Dublin, with the itinerary including a trip to the Guinness Storehouse on Saturday, Dinner in the CHQ on Sunday evening, and plenty of time to sample the Dublin nightlife too. The draw for all of this tourist group was well organised and fun racing on the ideal training ground of Dublin Bay – drawing over 200 bed nights on the weekend alone. Both why come to Ireland for a weekend, when you can tour the country for the rest of the week? One Irish Skipper turned tour guide, encouraged a large crew to travel the length and breadth of the country seeing all it is Ireland has to offer, after of course, seeing what in the school’s humble opinion is Ireland’s best offering, it's sailing!

The event has served as an excellent trial run for this style of activity, and plans are already afoot to build on the success of the weekend with a similar programme tailored to introducing more people to racing on Dublin Bay.

Published in INSS

Next Saturday 5 October sees the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire host an outboard engine course designed and presented by Brian Hughes.

With 48 years of experience in the industry — most notably and recently with Dalkey outboard engine specialists Killen Marine — Hughes will bring his wealth of knowledge and know-how to the day-long course at the INSS’s West Pier base.

Hughes says: “I feel quite strongly that a lot of boat owners really have very little knowledge about quite simple and basic aspects of their outboard (and to a certain extent inboards) so hopefully this is something I can help rectify … and keep me out of mischief while retired!”

The course fee is €89 and bookings can be made at 01 284 4195. For more visit INSS.ie

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing School (INSS) is seeking a full-time Instructor and co-ordinator. The successful candidate will also provide coordination assistance for the operation of a busy watersports centre.

Role Description

  • Role: Full Time Sailing Instructor / Operations Coordinator
  • Duration: 1-year contract starting immediately
  • Salary: Based on Experience
  • Hours: Wednesday to Sunday from September to May, Monday to Friday from June to August. Some flexibility is required.

  • Role Pre-requisites and Training Scope
  • Irish Sailing/RYA Dinghy Instructor Certificate
  • Irish Sailing/RYA Powerboat Level 2 Certificate
  • Applications are also welcome for candidates who hold senior instructor qualifications.

The school is also happy to take on a candidate with a dinghy instructor qualification, who will be mentored by a team of experienced senior instructors with a view to undertaking a senior instructor qualification during the contract.

Additional training in all aspects of boating may be made available with significant potential for advancement in the marine sector.

Applications

All parties with interest should send their CV to [email protected], using the reference "Full Time Sailing Instructor / Operations Coordinator" in the subject title. Interviews will be happening immediately.

Published in Jobs

Kenneth Rumball and John White are taking the Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School’s popular ‘man overboard’ lecture to the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s London clubhouse this evening (Thursday 16 May).

On 29 June 2018, the J109 yacht Jedi started the Round Ireland Yacht Race — but little did her crew of eight know that just says later, at 1am on 2 July, crew member John White would be swept overboard south-west of the Blasket Islands.

After well received talks at Wicklow Sailing Club in January and the Royal Irish Yacht Club in February, Rumball and White are in London to tell the story of how Jedi’s crew dealt with the situation — and what lessons were learnt from the incident.

Tonight’s RORC talk from 7pm is free for members and £10 for non-members, with booking available online HERE. For dinner reservations following the presentation email [email protected] or call +44 (0)207 493 2248.

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School is hosting its annual Open Day this Sunday 5 May with opportunities to try sailing, kayaking or paddleboarding for only €10.

Children aged 7 and up and their families can get to grips with the INSS’ fleet of 1720 Sportboats, as well as easy-to-master sit-on-yop kayaks and popular stand-up paddleboards, guided by the school’s experienced instructors.

Waterproof overalls and lifejackets will be provided for sailors, wetsuits and buoyancy aids for kayakers and paddleboarders, and hot showers will be provided after your fun on the water — so all you need to bring is your enthusiasm!

Three times slots are available on the day (10am-12pm, 12.30pm-2.30pm and 3pm-5pm) and booking must be made in advance. For more details see the INSS website HERE.

Published in INSS

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Irish National Marine Services are hosting a demonstration day for the RS Sailing range at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire this Sunday 28 April.

Included in the line-up will be the new RS21 keelboat, with opportunities to get sailing on the exciting design.

There’ll also be a selection of RS Sailing’s training fleet of RS Quests and RS Zests, while a demo RS Aero will be on the water for trials.

Time slots will be managed by the INSS office to ensure everyone gets out on their chosen boat for a test sail of between 60 and 90 minutes. For more details see the Facebook event page HERE.

Full changing and clubhouse facilities will be provided by the INSS ashore, and RS Sailing agent Kenneth Rumball will be afloat to chat about the boats and help out with the demos.

Ahead of the demonstration day, the RS21 will sail to Greystones tomorrow afternoon (Saturday 27 April) to coincide with the RS Easterns at Greystones Sailing Club.

Published in INSS
Tagged under

Irish National Marine Services have announced a demonstration day of RS Sailing craft on Sunday 28th April at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire. Included in the line up will be the new RS21 keelboat, with opportunities to get sailing on this exciting design.

There’ll also be a selection of RS Sailing’s training fleet of RS Quests and RS Zests. A demo RS Aero will also be on the water for trials.

"Included in the line up will be the new RS21 keelboat"

The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School’s office will manage bookings for time slots to ensure everyone gets out on their chosen boat for a test sail of between an hour and an hour and a half. Full changing and clubhouse facilities will be provided by the INSS ashore, and the RS Sailing Agent Kenneth Rumball will be afloat to chat about the boats and help out with the demos.

Irish National Marine Services are looking forward to welcoming all on the 28th of April. 

Enquiries about time slots to 01 2844195 or email [email protected]

Published in INSS

Since beginning to teach the yachting courses in 2015 the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School has been inundated with requests to charter their vessels. At first this was met by using the downtime of the school’s two training vessels, however, such is demand for teaching that there is no longer sufficient availability to meet all these requests.

It’s fantastic to see such a healthy growth in demand to get out on the water by more and more people, however, the common trend is that they do not have the time to take on the rigours of ownership. Ultimately, sailing in Ireland requires more boat owners, however, there’s no reason why these owners cannot be financially supported in keeping vessels afloat by those who cannot commit in the same way.

The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School is looking for boat owners who might consider working in partnership to meet the demands of this new emerging market. All the management of bookings, handovers and cleaning of the vessels would be completed by the school, along with certifying that charters have sufficient training, qualifications and experience to operate the yacht or powerboat. 

Speaking about the concept, Chief Instructor Kenneth Rumball is encouraged by the opportunity for the sailing and boat owning community to make getting afloat easier. “While many may view this as facilitating participants to reduce their level of commitment, our experience is that those who are given the opportunity to sail regularly go on, in time, to become owners of their own vessels, both dinghies and yachts. Any formula to increase the number of times someone participates can only help the long-term future of sailing in Ireland”.

You can contact Kenneth Rumball by email, [email protected], or call the school’s office on 01 2844195 for more details and a full breakdown of the proposals.

Published in INSS
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Dun Laoghaire Regatta –  From the Baily lighthouse to Dalkey island, the bay accommodates eight separate courses for 25 different classes racing every two years for the Dun Laoghaire Regatta.

In assembling its record-breaking armada, Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta (VDLR) became, at its second staging, not only the country's biggest sailing event, with 3,500 sailors competing, but also one of its largest participant sporting events.

One of the reasons for this, ironically, is that competitors across Europe have become jaded by well-worn venue claims attempting to replicate Cowes and Cork Week.

'Never mind the quality, feel the width' has been a criticism of modern-day regattas where organisers mistakenly focus on being the biggest to be the best.

Dun Laoghaire, with its local fleet of 300 boats, never set out to be the biggest. Its priority focussed instead on quality racing even after it got off to a spectacularly wrong start when the event was becalmed for four days at its first attempt.

The idea to rekindle a combined Dublin bay event resurfaced after an absence of almost 40 years, mostly because of the persistence of a passionate race officer Brian Craig who believed that Dun Laoghaire could become the Cowes of the Irish Sea if the town and the local clubs worked together.

Although fickle winds conspired against him in 2005, the support of all four Dun Laoghaire waterfront yacht clubs since then (made up of Dun Laoghaire Motor YC, National YC, Royal Irish YC and Royal St GYC), in association with the two racing clubs of Dublin Bay SC and Royal Alfred YC, gave him the momentum to carry on.

There is no doubt that sailors have also responded with their support from all four coasts. Entries closed last Friday with 520 boats in 25 classes, roughly doubling the size of any previous regatta held on the Bay.

Running for four days, the regatta is (after the large mini-marathons) the single most significant participant sports event in the country, requiring the services of 280 volunteers on and off the water, as well as top international race officers and an international jury, to resolve racing disputes representing five countries.

Craig went to some lengths to achieve his aims including the appointment of a Cork man, Alan Crosbie, to run the racing team; a decision that has raised more than an eyebrow along the waterfront.

A flotilla of 25 boats has raced from the Royal Dee near Liverpool to Dublin for the Lyver Trophy to coincide with the event. The race also doubles as a RORC qualifying race for the Fastnet.

Sailors from the Ribble, Mersey, the Menai Straits, Anglesey, Cardigan Bay and the Isle of Man have to travel three times the distance to the Solent as they do to Dublin Bay. This, claims Craig, is one of the major selling points of the Irish event and explains the range of entries from marinas as far away as Yorkshire's Whitby YC and the Isle of Wight.

Until now, no other regatta in the Irish Sea area could claim to have such a reach. Dublin Bay weeks such as this petered out in the 1960s, and it has taken almost four decades for the waterfront clubs to come together to produce a spectacle on and off the water to rival Cowes.

"The fact that we are getting such numbers means it is inevitable that it is compared with Cowes," said Craig. However, there the comparison ends.

"We're doing our own thing here. Dun Laoghaire is unique, and we are making an extraordinary effort to welcome visitors from abroad," he added.

The busiest shipping lane in the country – across the bay to Dublin port – is to close temporarily to facilitate the regatta and the placing of eight separate courses each day.

A fleet total of this size represents something of an unknown quantity on the bay as it is more than double the size of any other regatta ever held there.

The decision to alter the path of ships into the port was taken in 2005 when a Dublin Port control radar image showed an estimated fleet of over 400 yachts sailing across the closed southern shipping channel.

Ships coming into the bay, including the high-speed service to the port, will use the northern lane instead.

With 3,500 people afloat at any one time, a mandatory safety tally system for all skippers to sign in and out will also operate.

The main attraction is undoubtedly the appearance of four Super Zero class yachts, with Dun Laoghaire's Colm Barrington's TP52 'Flash Glove' expected to head the 'big boat' fleet. At the other end of the technology scale, the traditional clinker-built Water Wags will compete just as they did at a similar regatta over 100 years ago.

The arrival of three TP 52s and a Rogers 46 to Dun Laoghaire regatta is a feather in the cap of organisers because it brings Grand Prix racing to Dublin bay and the prospect of future prominent boat fixtures on the East Coast.

With 38 entries, the new Laser SB3s are set to make a significant impact although the White Sail Class five almost rivals them numerically. The Fireball is the biggest dinghy class, with 27 entries, while there are 25 entries for the Ecover Half Ton Classics Cup which began on Monday.

Class 0 is expected to be the most hotly contested, if the recent Saab IRC Nationals, Scottish Series and Sovereign's Cup are any indication. Three Cork boats ­- Jump Juice (Conor and Denise Phelan), Antix Dubh (Anthony O'Leary) and Blondie (Eamonn Rohan) - are expected to lead the fleet.

(First published in 2009)

Who: All four Dun Laoghaire Waterfront Yacht clubs

What: Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta

Why: A combined regatta to make Dun Laoghaire the Cowes of the Irish Sea.

Where: Ashore at Dun Laoghaire and afloat at eight separate race courses on Dublin Bay. Excellent views from both Dun Laoghaire piers, Sandycove and Seapoint.

Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021

The 2021 Regatta runs from 8-11 July

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