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Displaying items by tag: Wave Regatta

A reception at Howth Yacht Club tonight (Wednesday) was told of the special challenges faced in running the re-shaped season’s major sailing fixture in September, which will see the ICRA National Championship absorbed into Howth YC’s biennial block-buster event, the Wave Regatta, which in turn has developed around the time-honoured Lambay Race with its history dating back to 1904.

However, that remarkable history is now only a small part of it all, for as any of the hundreds, indeed thousands of keen sailors who took part in the first Wave Regatta in 2018 will agree, it has become a thoroughly modern event in its concept, organisation, and high level of sport provided.

Howth Yacht Club Wave Regatta receptionHowth Yacht Club staged a Wave Regatta reception to outline plans for September's second edition

But while the direct and unfettered approach could successfully fulfil its enormous potential two years ago, the restricted situation in 2020 is very different, and Wave Regatta Organising Committee Chairman and former HYC Commodore Brian Turvey was completely frank in outlining the challenges which he and his colleagues have been facing in re-structuring their programme in the age of COVID-19:

“During the months when Ireland has been learning to deal with the new circumstances, the Wave Regatta team has been regularly meeting online to consider the ever-changing route ahead. Our initial and early decision to defer the event by ten weeks from what we hope will be its regular schedule in every second year on the June Bank Holiday, carefully dove-tailing with Dun Laoghaire Regatta, was intended to allow us to see off the Coronavirus.

National Yacht Club Commodore Martin McCarthy, Dublin Bay Sailing Club Turkey Shoot organiser Fintan Cairns and Royal St. George Yacht Club Commodore Peter Bowring(From left) National Yacht Club Commodore Martin McCarthy, Dublin Bay Sailing Club Turkey Shoot organiser Fintan Cairns and Royal St. George Yacht Club Commodore Peter Bowring

At that time, we also had the requirement of finding a suitable weekend in what would normally be a busy national sailing schedule. It now seems like a very long time ago when we were searched for that right decision. But the pandemic continues to keep us guessing, yet with the help of our versatile and agile team here in Howth, and guidance from our national governing body Irish Sailing, we are planning to deliver an excellent event on that chosen weekend of the 11th of September.

Our re-designing of Wave Regatta for 2020 has centred around the provision of safety for our competitors. Inevitably this has meant that there will be tight restrictions on visitors this year, with the result that our after-sailing entertainment program will be significantly curtailed.

Michael Wright, Ann Marie Farrelly, Richard Colwell and Mayor David Healy(From left) Michael Wright, Ann Marie Farrelly, Richard Colwell and Mayor David Healy

However, our sport affords us lots of fresh air and wide-open spaces on Fingal’s very special coastline, and this allows us the opportunity to showcase this club’s world-class racing resources with a team that is anxious to do what it does best. Then too, our decision to combine Wave Regatta with the Irish Cruiser Racing National Championships will demonstrate a natural synergy, presenting the regatta as Ireland’s focal sailing event of 2020, while at the same time being one which is compliant with the national health requirements

In addition to the specially invited guests here this evening, we’re also delighted to welcome our sponsors including Fingal County Council, Wright Hospitality Group, Euro Car Parks, Cassidy Travel, WD40 and EasyTrip.ie. And let’s make no mistake about it - our sponsors’ supportive commitment to Wave Regatta during these very uncertain times has been - and continues to be - crucial to our ability to be agile with planning, affording us the confidence to reconstruct such a major sailing event.

Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta Chairman Don O'Dowd, Wave Regatta's Dave Cullen and VDLR Secretary Ciara Dowling(From left) Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta Chairman Don O'Dowd, Wave Regatta's Dave Cullen, VDLR Secretary Ciara Dowling and Patrick Burke of the Royal Irish Yacht Club

Sailing is a sport that is not without risk, a fact incorporated in its fundamental rules and the healthy challenge it provides. But risk management is also vital for onshore planning even in the best of times, and these are not the best of times. Thus I would like to take this opportunity to thank HYC for their detailed diligence in this area in helping to ensure that we have a safe regatta for all, visitors and members alike, at the club during the Wave Regatta.

We are preparing to deal with competitor and visitor registration in respect of contact tracing obligations, as well as aligning with governmental and Irish Sailing guidelines and precautions. Competitors and visitors to the event will very quickly realise it is a different experience to the last time round two years ago, though by the second week of September, most will probably be well aware of the requirements of the new reality.

Wave Regatta reception guests enjoy the evening sunshine on the deck at Howth Yacht ClubWave Regatta reception guests enjoy the evening sunshine on the deck at Howth Yacht Club

But we aren’t going to assume that. The organisers of an event of this significance can make no easy assumptions. Thus we will create a total framework within which everyone will feel reassured by an environment where their safe enjoyment will be paramount, something that will be very significantly aided by the fact that Howth’s attractive marina/clubhouse complex provides a closed compound within which effective safety requirements can be confidently and fully implemented

In addition to the provision of specially-designed sport facial masks for all competitors, in conjunction with the highly-developed expertise of Wright Hospitality Group the organising team and Howth Yacht Club will provide a unique and innovative hospitality food and drinks system, maximizing the use of the huge open space that the club forecourt provides, as well as encouraging crews to utilise their boats on the marina, and encouraging teams to remain in their own groups after racing.

Daily online registration for teams and visitors to this club will be de rigeur by September, as will the extensive hand-washing and social distancing protocols. Other COVID-led innovations - include a novel pared-back style of prize-giving - will be introduced, thereby avoiding the old-style awards system of large and crowded groups with exhausting and unreasonably extended ceremonies. In considering this, some may well assert: “About time, too”. So who knows, but we may even be setting a new and welcome trend in our sport.

Richard Colwell, former ICRA Commodore Norbert Reilly and Ian Byrne(From left) Richard Colwell, former ICRA Commodore Norbert Reilly and Ian Byrne

Our message for the competitive sailing community is that, for Wave 2020, we are looking forward to welcoming you and showing you how this new detailed format will look, and how it will function, and function successfully too. We are really excited to be rolling forward with what we have been told will be one of the only major sailing regattas to be held not just in Ireland, but in the world, in this very challenging year of 2020. We certainly recognise the very special demands we face. But in Howth, we feel our great sport of sailing makes it worthwhile to take on the challenge.

Published in Wave Regatta
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The effective full return to sailing announced last week is good timing for Howth’s Wave Regatta team who continue to work towards what is now likely to be the key sailing regatta of this very short sailing season.

Wave Regatta chairman Brian Turvey enthusiastically welcomed Irish Sailing’s news last week, which effectively allows a return to full sailing activities from this today, explaining ‘This confirms that our decision to postpone Wave Regatta until September 11th was both timely and correct. The fact that sailors can now return to racing with full crews means that they will enjoy 10-weeks of racing before the event and should have time to get boats and crew prepared. We are also delighted with the organisation team’s experience and work in respect of preparation for a ‘safe regatta’ and in line with sport and hospitality guidelines.’

In addition to their plans to make Wave 2020 the safest and most attractive regatta of the year, the team has advised of some further improvements to their original hugely successful regatta in 2018.

The format for this year’s event has been further modified to provide an additional ‘round-the-cans‘ race on the Saturday morning before Howth Yacht Club’s famous Lambay Race. Similarly, scoring has been modified, whereby the Lambay Race will score single points for those competing in the ICRA National Championships and will be discardable - whilst it will be non-discardable and carries a 1.5 weighting for boats competing for Wave Regatta prizes.

Early entry discount concludes this coming Friday (July 3rd) and it is expected that this week will draw many more entries, all availing of the reduced early-rate.
As plans evolve for the ‘shoreside’ set-up, the latest news is that a more complete hospitality offering will be in place, albeit carefully managed in respect of pandemic precautions. A huge outdoor lounge is to be built on Howth Yacht Club’s large forecourt, with extensive menus and top-class food available morning until night-time.

Online entry and Notice of Race can be accessed at waveregatta.com and a discount is still available until next Friday.

Published in Wave Regatta

The J80 class will join Wave Regatta this September for its national championships in the latest details just announced by Howth Yacht Club.

Given the seismic shake-up to the sailing calendar this year, Wave Regatta will certainly be a focal Irish sailing regatta for 2020, not least by incorporating the Irish Cruiser Racing Association National Championships and as such the event will focus on delivering an excellent championship for all the competing sailors over the 3 days from September 11th.

Howth Yacht Club is preparing with a ‘front-up’ focus on safety in respect of COVID-19. They will be ensuring that we fully comply with the protocols and guidelines as outlined by the HSE and also in conjunction with Sport Ireland and Irish Sailing.

Plans are already in place for controlled access to the club, along with an innovative self-assessment protocol for all competitors. Much of the live entertainment will be replaced by a creative offering, including food and drink service to ‘crew pods’ onshore and also a service direct to boats on the marina.

Race Director Dave Cullen was delighted to confirm that Jamie McWilliam’s Ker 43 ‘Signal 8’ competing in the event as part of it’s slightly delayed 2020 regatta programme. ‘It’s great to see Jamie and team back in Howth for Wave Regatta’ and Dave added ‘we’re looking forward to giving all the competing sailors an event to remember. We’re also delighted to confirm that the J80 class will join other one-design and ICRA classes that will enjoy their national championships within Wave Regatta’.

Jamie McWilliam's Ker Signal 8 will race at Wave Regatta in SeptemberJamie McWilliam's Ker Signal 8 will race at WAVE Regatta
Wave Regatta’s Brian Turvey understands the anxiety that sailors are feeling ‘We’re delighted to be rolling on with the event and plan to deliver a superb regatta for everybody who comes to Howth. Whilst we’re scaling back on the original hospitality offering and we’ll be concentrating on delivering the very highest quality racing event and providing a safe shoreside experience. The committed support from our sponsors has enabled us to proceed with the evolution and roll-out of Wave Regatta, ensuring that the rescheduled dates could be firmly secured.’

Event details and online entry are available here with a special discount in place for entries before the fast-approaching July 3rd. All entries are refundable as per the normal prescriptions.

Published in Wave Regatta

Howth Yacht Club has decided to move its WAVE Regatta from the end of May to 11-13th September.

The decision comes today as the Government moved to stem the spread of the coronavirus.

WAVE Regatta is the first of the Summer's big Irish sailing regattas and along with the second edition of the three-day event, the club's traditional Lambay Races will also move to the Autumn date.

The schedule will continue to offer keelboat classes the options of racing in the 3-day regatta or a single-day entry for Saturday’s Lambay Races.

More on the new date as we have it.

Published in Wave Regatta

The buoyant Flying Fifteens are looking forward to competing in Howth Yacht Club's Wave Regatta in May for the first time as part of the 2020 Irish fixtures calendar announced by Class President Chris Doorly today. 

After the excitement and the full programme leading up to the recent successful Subaru sponsored World Championships hosted by the National Yacht Club, next season promises to be as exciting but maybe a bit more relaxed. Doorly says he is hopeful the good numbers that attend the regional events will continue.

Regional championships attract up to 20 boats or more with the centre of racing on Dublin Bay regularly seeing high teens turnouts for DBSC club races.

The Championships of Ireland takes place in August at Waterford Harbour Sailing Club while the East Coast Championships return to the National Yacht Club.

For those wishing to travel further afield, the European Championships are in Crozan-Morgat, in Brittany in May.

MAY:
Thurs 21-Sat 23: European Championships- Crozan Morgat, France.

Sat 30- Sun 31: Southern Championships- Howth Wave Regatta

JUNE
Sat 20-Sun 21: Northern Championships- Portaferry

AUGUST
Fri 21-sun 23: Championship of Ireland- Dunmore East (WHSC)

SEPTEMBER
Sat 19-Sun 20: East Coast Championships- NYC

OCTOBER:
Sat 10-Sun 11: West Coast Championships -Lough Derg

Published in Flying Fifteen

Sailors for the Sea, the international “Green Boating” support organisation, has awarded Howth Yacht Club’s very successful Wave Regatta 2018 – staged from June 1st to 3rd – their Gold Certificate in enthusiastic recognition of the special efforts made by the Organising Committee to encourage recognition of environmental needs and awareness in every possible way before, during and since the event.

It is rare for a complex event on this scale to receive the top award. But Sailors for the Sea were particularly impressed by the way the Brian Turvey-chaired main Committee and the various sub-committees worked in their different and sometimes potentially conflicting areas towards the shared goal.

Sailors for the Sea highlight a wide variety of initiatives large and small undertaken in Howth which significantly contributed to the greater good - everything from the installation of bicycle racks through the provision of drinking water dispensers and the use of reusable water containers, paper straws, energy conservation, online forms, recyclable drinks and coffee containers, the promotion of public transport and ferry, implementation of Word Sailing Rule 55, recyclable food containers, and the elimination of all unnecessary plastic.

"the Gold Certificate award to Wave Regatta is a timely reminder that the enormous task of cleansing our world is only beginning"

It is only since the Wave Regatta concluded that the international Turn the Tide on Plastics movement has gained real traction as a tsunami of frightening images from the world’s most polluted areas has hit screens across the planet, and the Gold Certificate award to Wave Regatta is a timely reminder that the enormous task of cleansing our world is only beginning.

Published in Wave Regatta

Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta

From the Baily lighthouse to Dalkey island, the bay accommodates six separate courses for 21 different classes racing every two years for the Dun Laoghaire Regatta.

In assembling its record-breaking armada, Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta (VDLR) became, at its second staging, not only the country's biggest sailing event, with 3,500 sailors competing, but also one of Ireland's largest participant sporting events.

One of the reasons for this, ironically, is that competitors across Europe have become jaded by well-worn venue claims attempting to replicate Cowes and Cork Week.'Never mind the quality, feel the width' has been a criticism of modern-day regattas where organisers mistakenly focus on being the biggest to be the best. Dun Laoghaire, with its local fleet of 300 boats, never set out to be the biggest. Its priority focussed instead on quality racing even after it got off to a spectacularly wrong start when the event was becalmed for four days at its first attempt.

The idea to rekindle a combined Dublin bay event resurfaced after an absence of almost 40 years, mostly because of the persistence of a passionate race officer Brian Craig who believed that Dun Laoghaire could become the Cowes of the Irish Sea if the town and the local clubs worked together. Although fickle winds conspired against him in 2005, the support of all four Dun Laoghaire waterfront yacht clubs since then (made up of Dun Laoghaire Motor YC, National YC, Royal Irish YC and Royal St GYC), in association with the two racing clubs of Dublin Bay SC and Royal Alfred YC, gave him the momentum to carry on.

There is no doubt that sailors have also responded with their support from all four coasts. Running for four days, the regatta is (after the large mini-marathons) the single most significant participant sports event in the country, requiring the services of 280 volunteers on and off the water, as well as top international race officers and an international jury, to resolve racing disputes representing five countries. A flotilla of 25 boats regularly races from the Royal Dee near Liverpool to Dublin for the Lyver Trophy to coincide with the event. The race also doubles as a RORC qualifying race for the Fastnet.

Sailors from the Ribble, Mersey, the Menai Straits, Anglesey, Cardigan Bay and the Isle of Man have to travel three times the distance to the Solent as they do to Dublin Bay. This, claims Craig, is one of the major selling points of the Irish event and explains the range of entries from marinas as far away as Yorkshire's Whitby YC and the Isle of Wight.

No other regatta in the Irish Sea area can claim to have such a reach. Dublin Bay Weeks such as this petered out in the 1960s, and it has taken almost four decades for the waterfront clubs to come together to produce a spectacle on and off the water to rival Cowes."The fact that we are getting such numbers means it is inevitable that it is compared with Cowes," said Craig. However, there the comparison ends."We're doing our own thing here. Dun Laoghaire is unique, and we are making an extraordinary effort to welcome visitors from abroad," he added. The busiest shipping lane in the country – across the bay to Dublin port – closes temporarily to facilitate the regatta and the placing of six separate courses each day.

A fleet total of this size represents something of an unknown quantity on the bay as it is more than double the size of any other regatta ever held there.

Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta FAQs

Dun Laoghaire Regatta is Ireland's biggest sailing event. It is held every second Summer at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Dublin Bay.

Dun Laoghaire Regatta is held every two years, typically in the first weekend of July.

As its name suggests, the event is based at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. Racing is held on Dublin Bay over as many as six different courses with a coastal route that extends out into the Irish Sea. Ashore, the festivities are held across the town but mostly in the four organising yacht clubs.

Dun Laoghaire Regatta is the largest sailing regatta in Ireland and on the Irish Sea and the second largest in the British Isles. It has a fleet of 500 competing boats and up to 3,000 sailors. Scotland's biggest regatta on the Clyde is less than half the size of the Dun Laoghaire event. After the Dublin city marathon, the regatta is one of the most significant single participant sporting events in the country in terms of Irish sporting events.

The modern Dublin Bay Regatta began in 2005, but it owes its roots to earlier combined Dublin Bay Regattas of the 1960s.

Up to 500 boats regularly compete.

Up to 70 different yacht clubs are represented.

The Channel Islands, Isle of Man, England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Ireland countrywide, and Dublin clubs.

Nearly half the sailors, over 1,000, travel to participate from outside of Dun Laoghaire and from overseas to race and socialise in Dun Laoghaire.

21 different classes are competing at Dun Laoghaire Regatta. As well as four IRC Divisions from 50-footers down to 20-foot day boats and White Sails, there are also extensive one-design keelboat and dinghy fleets to include all the fleets that regularly race on the Bay such as Beneteau 31.7s, Ruffian 23s, Sigma 33s as well as Flying Fifteens, Laser SB20s plus some visiting fleets such as the RS Elites from Belfast Lough to name by one.

 

Some sailing household names are regular competitors at the biennial Dun Laoghaire event including Dun Laoghaire Olympic silver medalist, Annalise Murphy. International sailing stars are competing too such as Mike McIntyre, a British Olympic Gold medalist and a raft of World and European class champions.

There are different entry fees for different size boats. A 40-foot yacht will pay up to €550, but a 14-foot dinghy such as Laser will pay €95. Full entry fee details are contained in the Regatta Notice of Race document.

Spectators can see the boats racing on six courses from any vantage point on the southern shore of Dublin Bay. As well as from the Harbour walls itself, it is also possible to see the boats from Sandycove, Dalkey and Killiney, especially when the boats compete over inshore coastal courses or have in-harbour finishes.

Very favourably. It is often compared to Cowes, Britain's biggest regatta on the Isle of Wight that has 1,000 entries. However, sailors based in the north of England have to travel three times the distance to get to Cowes as they do to Dun Laoghaire.

Dun Laoghaire Regatta is unique because of its compact site offering four different yacht clubs within the harbour and the race tracks' proximity, just a five-minute sail from shore. International sailors also speak of its international travel connections and being so close to Dublin city. The regatta also prides itself on balancing excellent competition with good fun ashore.

The Organising Authority (OA) of Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta is Dublin Bay Regattas Ltd, a not-for-profit company, beneficially owned by Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club (DMYC), National Yacht Club (NYC), Royal Irish Yacht Club (RIYC) and Royal St George Yacht Club (RSGYC).

The Irish Marine Federation launched a case study on the 2009 Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta's socio-economic significance. Over four days, the study (carried out by Irish Sea Marine Leisure Knowledge Network) found the event was worth nearly €3million to the local economy over the four days of the event. Typically the Royal Marine Hotel and Haddington Hotel and other local providers are fully booked for the event.

©Afloat 2020

Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2023

The dates of the 2023 Dun Laoghaire Regatta are July 6-9

 

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