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Displaying items by tag: sprint

#Canoeing: Ronan Foley produced another promising result at the canoe sprint World Junior and Under-23 Championships in Plovdiv in Bulgaria. The Ireland paddler won the B Final of the junior men’s K1 500 metres. He had also won the B Final of the K1 1,000 metres. He placed 10th overall in both K1 500 and K1 1,000.

Canoe Sprint Junior World Championships, Plovdiv, Bulgaria (Irish interest)

Men, K1 500m – B Final (Places 10 to 19): 1 Ireland (R Foley) 1 min 41.398 sec.

Published in Canoeing

#Canoeing: Ronan Foley won the B Final of the Junior K1 1,000 metres at the Canoe Sprint World Junior and Under-23 Championships in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, today. The Kilcullen man had over two seconds to spare over his nearest rival, Philip Miles of Britain. The win places him 10th overall.

 Just three weeks ago, Foley took gold in the canoe marathon European Championships in Croatia.

Canoe Sprint World Junior Championships, Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Junior K1 1,000 – B Final (Places 10 to 18): 1 Ireland (R Foley) 3 min 38.463 sec.

Published in Canoeing

#CANOEING: Andrzej Jezierski finished sixth in his semi-final of the men’s C1 200m at the Canoe Sprint World Championships and will compete in tomorrow’s B Final in Moscow. Peter Egan and Simas Dobrovolskis were seventh in their semi-final of the men’s K1 200m and will go to the C Final. Jenny Egan made her exit from the K1 200m, as she finished eighth in her semi-final, and finished 11th in the women’s 5,000 metres. Jenny Burke placed 4th in the B final of the K1 1,000m, 13th overall.

Canoe Sprint World Championships, Day Four (Irish interest, selected results)

Men

K2 200m – Semi-Final: 7 P Egan, S Dobrovolskis 34.004.

C1 200m – Semi-Final (First Three to A Final; next Three to B Final; rest out): 1 Lithuania 38.320; 6 A Jezierski 39.638.

Women

K1 – B Final (Places 10 to 18): 4 J Burke 3:05.18.

K1 200 – Semi-Final: 8 J Egan 43.097.

K1 5,000 – Final: 1 Britain 23 mins, 10.957 secs; 11 J Egan 24:08.510

 

Published in Canoeing
The Irish Canoe Union will host a sprint head-to-head regatta in Kildare next weekend.
All canoeists in classes K1 200m and 500m are welcome to take part in the event, on the Grand Canal in Prosperous on Saturday 26 March starting at 10.30am.
Heats will be seeded based on previous regatta performances and personal best times. The event finals will then be decided on fastest time from heats.
Entries are open till 8pm on Wednesday 23 March. Entry forms are available via the Canoeing Ireland website.

The Irish Canoe Union will host a sprint head-to-head regatta in Kildare next weekend.

All canoeists in classes K1 200m and 500m are welcome to take part in the event, on the Grand Canal in Prosperous on Saturday 26 March starting at 10.30am.

Heats will be seeded based on previous regatta performances and personal best times. The event finals will then be decided on fastest time from heats.

Entries are open till 8pm on Wednesday 23 March. Entry forms are available via the Canoeing Ireland website.

Published in Canoeing

About Currachs

A currach is a type of boat unique to the west coasts of Ireland and Scotland. Traditionally, currachs have a wooden frame over which animal skins or hides are stretched. These days, the wooden frame is more likely to be covered in canvas, which is then painted with tar to make it waterproof.

"Naomhóg" is the name given to the type of currach which used by coastal communities in Cork and Kerry. Currachs differ from each other from region to region. Naomhógs are slightly longer than the currachs used in the West of Ireland.
 
Some believe that currachs first came to the Dingle Peninsula in the early 19th century. They say this type of boat was introduced from Clare, where currachs are known as "canoes". 

Currachs are a unique type of boat that can be found on the west coasts of Ireland and Scotland. These boats are traditionally constructed using a wooden frame over which animal skins or hides are stretched. While this practice is still observed by some, many modern currachs now feature a canvas covering which is painted with tar to make it waterproof.

In coastal communities located in the Cork and Kerry regions, a specific type of currach is used which is known as a Naomhóg. Naomhógs are slightly longer than other types of currachs used in the West of Ireland. It is believed that currachs were first introduced to the Dingle Peninsula in the early 19th century, having been brought over from Clare where they are known as "canoes".

Despite the fact that currachs have been in use for centuries, the different regions in which they are used have developed their own unique variations. As such, currachs can differ from one another significantly depending on their geographic location. Nonetheless, these boats remain an integral part of coastal communities, serving as a reminder of our shared maritime heritage.

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