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Displaying items by tag: pump

#dieselforboaters – The problem of lack of fuel supplies around the Irish coast just got a little bit easier with the news that the popular south coast marina at Kilmore Quay in County Wexford has installed a new diesel fuel oil facility. The new equipment dispenses filtered low sulphur marked gas oil. Payment for the service can be made by credit and debit card. The self service system is available on a 24/7 basis and available to all harbour users.

More information from Marine Officer, Captain Phil Murphy, Wexford County Council, email :[email protected], Tel 053 9129955 (Kilmore Quay) / 9122300 (Wexford Harbour) and Fax 053 9129915.

Published in Irish Marinas

#RESCUE - BreakingNews.ie reports that two men have been rescued from a sinking fishing boat in Galway Bay this afternoon.

One of the two men on board the vessel alerted rescue services around 2pm after they began taking on water close to Salthill west of the city.

Two other fishing boats aided the duo before the Galway RNLI lifeboat crew boarded the vessel and used a pump to keep it afloat.

The stricken boat has since been towed back to the city docks.

Published in Rescue
Last night, Lough Derg RNLI lifeboat, Toshiba Wave Warrior, was requested by Valentia Coast Guard to go to the assistance of 1 person, on board a 33ft cruiser on rocks after suffering engine failure, and which was now taking on considerable amounts of water. Mathew Gallagher, skipper of Aftermath was standing by, but was unable to get close to the casualty.

At 17.54hrs the lifeboat, with helm Eleanor Hooker, Colin Knight and Ger Egan was launched. The lifeboat carried its salvage pump, and in addition, Lifeboat Operations Manager, Charles Stanley-Smith made contact with Fergal Kerney, Lifeboat Deputy Launching Authority, who agreed to take a second salvage pump to Portumna by road.

At 18.15hrs the lifeboat was alongside the casualty vessel which was listing to port and on rocks. There were two persons on board (the skipper has been joined by a friend, a marine mechanic). The lifeboat transferred an RNLI crew member and the salvage pump to the casualty vessel and the lifeboat salvage pump was immediately put to work. The cruiser Aftermath met Fergal Kerney and took him to the scene. At 18.21hrs the lifeboat transferred the second salvage pump to the casualty vessel, set up a tow and held off head to weather.

At 19.25, (it was now dusk) and with two pumps running, the vessel was not floated. At 19.34hrs, RNLI Lifeboat helm agreed one last attempt to float the vessel before taking all persons off. Eamon Egan, Marine Engineer, brought a third, larger pump to the vessel from Portumna. At 19:45hrs, when the boat was not floated with three pumps running, the lifeboat made the decision to take all persons off and advised Valentia Coast Guard of same. At 20.15hrs, the two persons from the casualty vessel were transferred onto Aftermath, who had offered to take them back to Portumna. The owner will attempt to refloat his vessel in daylight tomorrow. The lifeboat returned to station and was ready for service again at 21.10hrs.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under
26th December 2010

Protect Your Boat in the Thaw

After weeks of snow a thaw is underway across Ireland today but melting snow will produce even more difficulties for boat owners.

For starters boats without an automatic bilge pump can end up flooded but even if fitted prolonged pump use can drain batteries.

It's very easy to make one of the five most common winterising mistakes. Check them HERE.

It's not too late to check on your boat and shake off that snow! 

snowonboat

Published in Boat Maintenance
Tagged under

Ireland's Trading Ketch Ilen

The Ilen is the last of Ireland’s traditional wooden sailing ships.

Designed by Limerick man Conor O’Brien and built in Baltimore in 1926, she was delivered by Munster men to the Falkland Islands where she served valiantly for seventy years, enduring and enjoying the Roaring Forties, the Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties.

Returned now to Ireland and given a new breath of life, Ilen may be described as the last of Ireland’s timber-built ocean-going sailing ships, yet at a mere 56ft, it is capable of visiting most of the small harbours of Ireland.

Wooden Sailing Ship Ilen FAQs

The Ilen is the last of Ireland’s traditional wooden sailing ships.

The Ilen was designed by Conor O’Brien, the first Irish man to circumnavigate the world.

Ilen is named for the West Cork River which flows to the sea at Baltimore, her home port.

The Ilen was built by Baltimore Sea Fisheries School, West Cork in 1926. Tom Moynihan was foreman.

Ilen's wood construction is of oak ribs and planks of larch.

As-built initially, she is 56 feet in length overall with a beam of 14 feet and a displacement of 45 tonnes.

Conor O’Brien set sail in August 1926 with two Cadogan cousins from Cape Clear in West Cork, arriving at Port Stanley in January 1927 and handed it over to the new owners.

The Ilen was delivered to the Falkland Islands Company, in exchange for £1,500.

Ilen served for over 70 years as a cargo ship and a ferry in the Falkland Islands, enduring and enjoying the Roaring Forties, the Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties. She stayed in service until the early 1990s.

Limerick sailor Gary McMahon and his team located Ilen. MacMahon started looking for her in 1996 and went out to the Falklands and struck a deal with the owner to bring her back to Ireland.

After a lifetime of hard work in the Falklands, Ilen required a ground-up rebuild.

A Russian cargo ship transported her back on a 12,000-mile trip from the Southern Oceans to Dublin. The Ilen was discharged at the Port of Dublin 1997, after an absence from Ireland of 70 years.

It was a collaboration between the Ilen Project in Limerick and Hegarty’s Boatyard in Old Court, near Skibbereen. Much of the heavy lifting, of frames, planking, deadwood & backbone, knees, floors, shelves and stringers, deck beams, and carlins, was done in Hegarty’s. The generally lighter work of preparing sole, bulkheads, deck‐houses fixed furniture, fixtures & fittings, deck fittings, machinery, systems, tanks, spar making and rigging is being done at the Ilen boat building school in Limerick.

Ten years. The boat was much the worse for wear when it returned to West Cork in May 1998, and it remained dormant for ten years before the start of a decade-long restoration.

Ilen now serves as a community floating classroom and cargo vessel – visiting 23 ports in 2019 and making a transatlantic crossing to Greenland as part of a relationship-building project to link youth in Limerick City with youth in Nuuk, west Greenland.

At a mere 56ft, Ilen is capable of visiting most of the small harbours of Ireland.

©Afloat 2020