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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Erne Waterway

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that tree trimming and hedge cutting will be carried out at various locations during the autumn/winter period from September 2023 to February 2024.

During this operation, floating pontoons will be located on the water with mechanical plant operating. Mechanical plant will also be in operation along the banks of the waterway.

Masters will be advised by Waterways Ireland staff when making a passage and the co-operation of masters is requested at this time.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience caused to its customers.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that diving operations will be taking place between Lough Scur and Lock 9 on Wednesday 30 August to remove debris from the navigation channel.

Masters of vessels and all water users should proceed with additional caution in the area during this period, adds the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and other users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that Inland Fisheries Ireland will be conducting a fish stock survey on Lough Scur between Monday 14 and Thursday 17 August.

All nets will be clearly marked by orange buoys marked ‘IFI Survey’, adds the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

Masters of vessels and all water users should proceed with additional caution when operating on Lough Scur during this period.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland informs masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that the waterfront jetty in Leitrim village is now owned and managed by Waterways Ireland.

This jetty is located upstream of the slipway on the northern side of the waterway. The Shannon Navigation Bye Laws apply to this jetty from Monday 17 April, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway that the 2022-23 winter mooring period for public harbours on these navigations has ended as of Friday 31 March.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds that Shannon Navigation Bye-law No. 17(3) now applies: vessels should not berth in the same harbour for longer than the statutory period of five consecutive days nor more than a total of seven days in any one month.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that all 16 locks on the inland waterway will be out of service from Friday 23 December to Monday 2 January inclusive.

No lock passage by boat will be possible during this period. Normal service will resume at 9am on Tuesday 3 January.

The service blocks at Aghalane and Haughton’s Shore are closed until Wednesday 15 March. Service blocks at Ballyconnell, Ballinamore, Keshcarrigan and Leitrim shall remain open.

All associated land-based and water-based Blueway trails shall remain open.

Further information is available during normal business hours from Waterways Ireland’s Carrick-on-Shannon office at +44 (0)71 965 0562.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that tree trimming and hedge cutting will be carried out at various locations along the waterway during the winter period from now until February 2023.

During this operation, floating pontoons will be located on the water with mechanical plant operating. Mechanical plant will also be in operation along the banks of the waterway.

Masters will be advised by Waterways Ireland staff when making a passage, and the cooperation of masters is requested at this time, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway that the winter mooring period for public harbours on these navigations will commence on Tuesday 1 November.

Masters wishing to avail of winter mooring — which continues until 31 March 2023 — are required to register online and pay the winter mooring fee of €63.50 prior to 1 November.

Masters must apply for winter mooring at a specific harbour. They will then receive by email their approval, rejection or an alternative location of application. Upon approval, follow the link in the email to pay the required fee online.

Masters are reminded that Bye-law 17 of the Canals Act — the “5 consecutive days/ 7 days in one month rule” — continues to apply for those not availing of winter mooring.

Waterways Ireland says it will be disconnecting its electricity supply points and water supply at public moorings for the winter period. Both services will be reinstated prior to the commencement of the 2023 boating season, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Owners are urged to note that vessels are moored in public harbours at the owners risk at all times and may be directed to other harbours “as operational exigencies require”.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft that maintenance dredging will be taking place on the Shannon-Erne Waterway in Co Cavan until Friday 30 September.

The dredging will take place on the inland waterway in the vicinity of Lock 1 in Corraquill and Lock 2 at Ballyconnell.

During this operation a floating pontoon will be located on the water with mechanical dredging plant operating. The navigable channel will remain open outside of the immediate area being dredged.

Masters of vessels are asked to comply with safety signage and heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area. 

Published in Inland Waterways

Safety on the water must be improved as demand for staycations on the inland waterways increases.

That’s the warning from boat operators on the Shannon, as reported in The Irish Times, who have raised various issues such as a lack of qualified mechanics for maintenance, poor boat handling and a lack of enforcement of existing bye-laws.

“The Government have a huge thing about water safety at the minute,” says Leslie Shaw, proprietor of Portumna Marine, “but it seems to be only for swimmers.”

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways
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The Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School is based on Dun Laoghaire's West Pier on Dublin Bay and in the heart of Ireland's marine leisure capital.

Whether you are looking at beginners start sailing course, a junior course or something more advanced in yacht racing, the INSS prides itself in being able to provide it as Ireland's largest sailing school.

Since its establishment in 1978, INSS says it has provided sailing and powerboat training to approximately 170,000 trainees. The school has a team of full-time instructors and they operate all year round. Lead by the father and son team of Alistair and Kenneth Rumball, the school has a great passion for the sport of sailing and boating and it enjoys nothing more than introducing it to beginners for the first time. 

Programmes include:

  • Shorebased Courses, including VHF, First Aid, Navigation
  • Powerboat Courses
  • Junior Sailing
  • Schools and College Sailing
  • Adult Dinghy and Yacht Training
  • Corporate Sailing & Events

History of the INSS

Set up by Alistair Rumball in 1978, the sailing school had very humble beginnings, with the original clubhouse situated on the first floor of what is now a charity shop on Dun Laoghaire's main street. Through the late 1970s and 1980s, the business began to establish a foothold, and Alistair's late brother Arthur set up the chandler Viking Marine during this period, which he ran until selling on to its present owners in 1999.

In 1991, the Irish National Sailing School relocated to its current premises at the foot of the West Pier. Throughout the 1990s the business continued to build on its reputation and became the training institution of choice for budding sailors. The 2000s saw the business break barriers - firstly by introducing more people to the water than any other organisation, and secondly pioneering low-cost course fees, thereby rubbishing the assertion that sailing is an expensive sport.