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Dublin Bay and Greystones sailor Marshall King of the Royal St. George Yacht Club, who is the corinthian World Champion in the J70 class, has some work to do in the Class's British National Championships if he is to move up from sixth in IRL 1123 'Soak Racing' to retain the national title in the final three races on the Solent today.

The Solent is a tricky place to sail, especially when the wind is all over the place. Uber wind shifts postponed the start of the second day of the J/70 UK National Championships, but once the wind direction stabilized, three windward leeward races were hard fought for the 22-strong fleet. Paul Ward’s Eat Sleep J Repeat took a brace of bullets to lead the regatta by two points. Graham Clapp’s Jeepster scored a 1-2-1 to move up to second. Martin Dent’s Jelvis drops to third but is still in with a shot at the title going into the final day.

22 teams are competing for the 2020 J/70 National Championships on the Solent22 teams are competing for the 2020 J/70 National Championships Photo: Louay Habib

Eat Sleep J Repeat’s Ruairidh Scott is a World Champion in the J/70, J/80 and J/111 classes, and commented after racing: “It wasn’t easy in a competitive fleet, especially upwind when the chop gets going, it is challenging to keep the speed up. Crew weight, technique and also mast rake has a big influence on performance. This fleet is spirited and upwind there is not a lot in it. However, the first downwind leg today, we were the first boat to go into wing-on-wing, and that got us away.”

Ben Saxton, NACRA 17 World Champion, has been racing in the J/70 Class for four years, Ben is part of Graham Clapp’s crew on Jeepster. “To win in the J/70 Class, you need good teamwork,” commented Saxton. “If you start well and you are quick enough, then you can bring your tactics into play. We are pretty stacked for weight, so quick upwind but not as fast downwind. We have been working on downwind technique and we are getting faster, which shows in the results. We have worked hard to get it right and we passed Eat Sleep upwind today for our win, so that was a good feeling.”

Tales from the J70 Peloton

Patrick Liardet’s Cosmic is currently lying in 12th position with a crew of young talented sailors including; son Freddie, Jack Hanslope and Richard Anderton. On the racecourse and in the results, Cosmic is mixing it with sailors from the Olympics, World Champions and top professional sailors.

“It is the first time we have all sailed together and mixing it up in the fleet has been good fun,” commented Patrick. “This is a very tough fleet with strong sailors, and it’s tremendous. Richard is a World Champion Fireball crew, Freddie is very strong in dinghies and keelboats and Jack is his friend from Uni’ who is a great team racer. The boats are evenly matched, so you are really fighting for every place, all the way down the fleet.”

Racing at the J/70 UK National Championship concludes Sunday 13th September with three races scheduled in The Solent.

Results here

Published in News Update
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Greystones helmsman Marshall King from County Wicklow but who lives in the UK has won the J/70 Corinthian World Championship in dramatic style on Soak Racing yesterday. In the last race, Soak Racing was four places ahead of Doug Struth (GBR) racing DSP. A tie on points for the series was settled by countback, a single place after 14 races gave Soak Racing victory. Denis Cherevatenko (RUS) racing Joyfull was third. Fiona Hampshire (GBR) racing Elizabeth was best Corinthian Woman Helm in the championship.

“Amazing, we have been trying to win this for six years, so it feels just amazing. Torbay has been exceptionally tricky, and we have had great competition at a really well-organised regatta, and it is great to come away with the win. Today's racing was really exciting, we were 10 points behind DSP going into the last two races. We had an excellent Race 13 and then it was about staying with DSP and making sure there were not too many boats between us. It all came down to the last 100 metres, and we did just enough.”

The Darwin Escapes 2019 J/70 World Championships Awards Ceremony was held in the Event Marquee. Event Director Bob Penfold introduced Admiral of the Royal Torbay Yacht Club, Nigel Wollen to present the prizes and winners trophies. Darwin Escapes Chief Executive Anthony Esse described the event as a “complete triumph” and showing gratitude to Bob Penfold generously announced a free holiday at Darwin Escapes for Bob and his wife Sue. GAC Pindar represented by Andrew Pindar, who has been sponsoring sailing events for 39 years, was also invited to the stage and was full of praise for an amazing regatta.

The Royal Torbay Yacht Club and their dedicated volunteer support were roundly applauded by all of the J/70 sailors for producing a fantastic regatta. Stuart Childerley and the Race Management team received huge applause for providing high-quality race courses in tricky conditions.

Published in Racing
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Marshall King and Ian Wilson’s Soak Racing was the new leader in the Corinthian class after posting 2-34-9 yesterday (Wednesday 4 September) in the Darwin Escapes 2019 J/70 World Championship, writes Louay Habib.

The Greystones-linked pair’s performance saw Doug Struth (GBR), racing DSP, drop to second in the standings. Denis Cherevatenko (RUS) racing Joyfull retains third but is under pressure from a top performance today by Charles Thompson (GBR) in Brutus.

“It is really difficult to track the boats in the Corinthian fleet because we are all out on one race course and we are racing against the pros and we can give them a really good run for their money but we do keep an eye out for our mates from Hamble, DSP, if we are in front of them, we know we are doing well,” said Ian Wilson, who is also J/70 international class president.

“It was brilliant today, blowing 20 knots, wind all over the place, a great day out with boats hooning all over the place – just great fun. We are hoping for more of the same tomorrow, big breeze and great racing in Tor Bay.”

Indeed, the breeze piping in from the north created full-on battle conditions for the 20 nation fleet on Wednesday, and for the third consecutive day both the Corinthian and Open leaders have changed.

In the Open class, Paul Ward (GBR) and Eat, Sleep, J, Repeat scored a 1-4-15 to take the overall lead, and Pichu Torcida (ESP) racing Noticia has climbed to second after scoring a 5-17-6.

Joel Ronning (USA) racing Catapult, dropped to third after scoring 14-14-10., while yesterday’s leader Alberto Rossi (ITA), racing Enfant Terrible, started the day well posting 9-8 but a 28 in the last race after broaching out drops Enfant Terrible to fourth.

Teams from nine nations occupy the top 10 places after a day that also race wins for Henry Brauer (USA) on Rascal, and Carlo Alberini (ITA) racing Calvi Network.

Provisionals results can be found HERE.

Published in Racing

Marshall King from Greystones and Ian Wilson’s Soak Racing followed up their Corinthian UK National title win at Royal Torbay last week with a strong start in the Darwin Escapes 2019 J/70 World Championship at the same venue, writes Louay Habib.

The event kicked off yesterday (Monday 2 September) with three races in Torbay, where big wind shifts and changes in wind speed tested the 78 teams competing as well as the race management team led by Stuart Childerley.

In the Corinthian class, Patrick Liardet (GBR) racing Cosmic ended the day leading by just one point from Doug Struth (GBR) racing DSP.

Wilson & King (IRL) completed a trio of British Isles boats leading the championship for the Corinthian title. There were also race wins for Pichu Torcida (ESP) racing Noticia, Reg Lord (AUS) racing Juno, and Nelson Mettraux (SUI) racing CER Aprotec–Ville de Genève.

In the Open class, Joel Ronning (USA) racing Catapult, led the championship after three races. Second was Claudia Rossi (ITA) racing Petite Terrible, which recovered from a 28th place in Race 1 to post two podium finishes. Andrey Malygin (RUS) racing Maria was third.

Published in Racing

Marhall King and Ian Wilson's Soak Racing is the Corinthian UK National Champion at Royal Torbay writes Louay Habib

Michael Goldfarb's Warcanoe from Seattle (USA) was the top team out of all the 35 international teams competing. Calascione & Ripard's Calypso (MLT) was third for the Open UK Championship, and second for the Corinthian entries. 2018 J/70 UK Champion, Doug Struth's DSP, was third this year.

For the final day light airs conditions continued, two races were completed won by the highly impressive Luis Albert's Patakin (ESP) and Peter Duncan's Relative Obscurity, which finally found a vein of form. Sergei Dobrovolskii's Amaiz Sailing Team (CYP) continued their sensational form to finish the regatta third overall. Marcos Soares' Highlanders and Renato Faria's To Nessa, both from Brazil, also impressed.

Paul Ward was awarded the J/70 UK National Championship Trophy by UK Class Captain, Hannah Le Prevost. “A big thank you to Bob Penfold and the Royal Torbay Yacht Club for all of their hard work in hosting this event. I would also like to thank all of our friends from the international fleet, which have helped us Brits to go faster! I am sure I speak on behalf of all the competitors to congratulate the race committee led by Stuart Childerley for giving us great racing in difficult conditions.” commented Paul Ward. “Looking at the trophy, it dates back to 2013, when I was thinking about buying my first J Boat. Since then I have been lucky enough to get involved with a very good team, which really enjoys being together. We have spent a lot of time sailing together and that is paying off.” continued Ward.

Ian Wilson and Marshall King won the championship in 2017, and third in 2018. “We are back with a bang this year, and this is a special one with so many great international teams competing. It was brutal out there; you made a mistake and you dropped 10-15 places, just by being slow out of a tack.” commented Ian Wilson, who is also President of the J/70 International Class. “I brought the nationals and the worlds here because it is one of the hardest places to sail in the UK if not the world – they don't play the US Open Golf at Augusta because it is a nice easy golf course, and so we have come to Torbay. This race area rewards those that keep their head out of the boat and it punishes those that don't.”

Published in Greystones Harbour
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The J/70 UK National Championship kicks off this UK Bank Holiday weekend hosted by the Royal Torbay Yacht Club where an Irish entry is a major contender writes Louay Habib.

The event precedes the Darwin Escapes 2019 World Championship (29 Aug – 06 Sept). However, this weekend's regatta is far more than a curtain-raiser for the big event. 35 teams will be racing at the open national championships with top British teams taking on a stellar international fleet from Australia, Brazil, Cyprus, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the USA.

2018 J/70 UK National Champion, Doug Struth's DSP, will be defending their title and will face stiff opposition from the best of British and Irish challenges to retain the trophy. Paul Ward's Eat, Sleep, J, Repeat and Soak Racing, sailed by Ian Wilson and Greystones Olympian Marshall King, have been the top two teams in this year's UK Grand Slam Series. Martin Dent's Jelvis, Jeremy Thorp's Phan, and Graham Clapp's Jeepster will all be in the running, as will Calascione and Ripard's Calypso, and Charles Thompson's Brutus. Fiona Hampshire's Royal Thames YC team will also be one to watch.

Entry List for 2019 J/70 UK National Championship here

Published in Racing
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Eight races were held in champagne conditions for 18 J/70 teams in The Solent. Bright sunshine and a huge range of wind conditions provided spectacular racing with fun-filled social events all organised by the Royal Thames Yacht Club. 2017 UK National Champions, Ian Wilson & County Wicklow's Marshall King in Soak Racing scored all podium finishes including five bullets to win the regatta and lift the Myosotis Cutter Cup.

“To be honest, the results flattered us,” commented Ian Wilson. “The J/70 UK fleet are getting faster and smarter, which is great to see. I think it is very important for the leading UK teams to race in the Solent because it does bring on the competition, and that pushes everybody on for a better performance. The Royal Thames event is a great won to win because it means you go to the their end of season prize giving, it took me two days to recover after the last one!”

In second place was John Greenland's Jdog, flying the colours of the Royal Thames, the team was racing one of the J/70s owned by the RTYC, four of which are available for charter. Despite not winning a race, Greenland's team was only out of the top five in one race during the eight race series.

Graham Clapp's Jeepster representing the Royal Southern YC started the regatta with a bullet and went on to score two more podium finishes, and no worse than eighth in the series resulted in third for the regatta.

In addition to the top three teams, six more teams made the race podium during the regatta: Niklas Zennstrom's Rán, Joshua Flack's Elizabeth, Patrick Liardet's Cosmic, Simon Cavey's Just4Play, Tara Gill-Taylor's RTYC Academy, and Phil Rys' Bryn.

The 2019 J/70 UK Grand Slam Series continues 18-20 July with Round 5,the J/70 UK Class Training Event, organised by the Royal Southern Yacht Club. Early entry fee applies until July 15, 2019. For more information: https://yachtscoring.com/emenu.cfm?eid=9454

Published in Racing
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Warsash Spring Championships on the Solent Ian Wilson & former Greystones-based sailor Marshall King's Soak Racing started the J/70 UK Grand Slam Series in style, winning the opening round of the nine-regatta Grand Slam Series.

The Irish Olympian (1996 Soling sailor) scored five bullets out of eight races over the two days, including a hat trick on the last day. Second was Doug Struth's DSP, who scored two races wins, as well as two-second places. Paul Ward's Eat, Sleep. J, Repeat was third, just one point ahead of Phil Rees racing Bryn. Ten teams made the top five over the course of the weekend.

Full Results Link

Published in Greystones Harbour
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Lift out on to hard standing is the ideal way to keep a sportsboat clean but has the added burden of lift in and out each time you want to sail. VersaDock, the modular floats provider for pontoons and dock solutions, has introduced its latest dry dock to give sportsboat and other small sailing boat owners the benefits of low maintenance and convenience of berthing their boats clear of the water.

The latest generation Version 2 of the VersaDock DrySail™ System (V2) has been designed and engineered specifically for modern lifting keel sports boats. New technology and design has enabled the DrySail™ V2 to be extremely light and very easy to assemble.

Drysail ™V2 is sold as an alternative to marina drysailing contracts, or being in the water for lond periods. It’s easy to winch your own boat in and out of the water in around a minute at any time. The stable platform gives handy all round access to the boat.

Drysail ™V2 is less than half the weight of previous generations of drysail docks, and its frames are smaller and easier to pack, which claims Versadock means there are huge savings to freight costs to any part of the world. Best of all, the new design is so simple to assemble that you can do it yourself, saving on installation charges. 

The DrySail™ V2 system works in conjunction with all other VersaDock systems and can be integrated into their standard pontoons, platforms, drive on docks and walkways. The standard dock fits into a normal sized marina berth, turning it into a drysail platform, and it can be moored alongside other pontoons, or secured to river moorings. In fact its versatility means it can be put virtually anywhere where a boat can float onto it. It can even sit securely on the bottom if the tide dries out.

VersaDock has designed the new DrySail™ V2 dock for the J/70, Melges 24, SB20 and Longtze Premier, to name a few types of sportsboats, while the system can easily be optimised to fit individual requirements.

VersaDock are offering Drysail ™V2 at an introductory price of £6100  ex. tax and delivery for a typical J/70 dock until 1st July.

Published in Irish Marinas

#hyc – A Sportsboat Cup for Irish keelboat classes to be held around Midsummers day and tailored especially for 1720s, SB20s, Quarter Tonners, J24s, RS Elites, Dragons, J80s and J70s, is to be staged for the first time at Howth Yacht Club in north Dublin from 20th - 22nd June 2014.

At this multiclass event each of the sportsboat classes will be given their own start, results and prizes.

The event will incorporate the 1720 European championships as part of the event and there is an expectation of visiting UK and continental crews too.

Racing will be one design with the exception of the quarter tonners and mixed class who will race under IRC. Class rules will apply where applicable.

HYC says any other sportsboat type that has an IRC cert will also be accommodated in a mixed sportsboat fleet.

Howth is using the event to champion its sailing facilities both on the water and ashore at the 'bustling fishing village' venue that is also close to Dublin airport.

The largest club in the country has two cranes, a 300–berth marina, sizeable hardstanding, a large club house with bar, terrace and dining facilities not to mention secure changing and showering facilities

HYC is ideally placed to host this Sportsboat Cup. Car parking, craning, berthing and trailer storage are all included in the entry fee and racing will be organised by top National and International Race Officers.

With no racing starting before 12 each day there will be ample time to freshen up in the morning after the great social that is planned for each evening.

Online Entry available by clicking the HYC advert at the top of the Afloat homepage.

Published in Howth YC
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Annalise Murphy, Olympic Silver Medalist

The National Yacht Club's Annalise Murphy (born 1 February 1990) is a Dublin Bay sailor who won a silver medal in the 2016 Summer Olympics. She is a native of Rathfarnham, a suburb of Dublin.

Murphy competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in the Women's Laser Radial class. She won her first four days of sailing at the London Olympics and, on the fifth day, came in 8th and 19th position.

They were results that catapulted her on to the international stage but those within the tiny sport of Irish sailing already knew her of world-class capability in a breeze and were not surprised.

On the sixth day of the competition, she came 2nd and 10th and slipped down to second, just one point behind the Belgian world number one.

Annalise was a strong contender for the gold medal but in the medal race, she was overtaken on the final leg by her competitors and finished in 4th, her personal best at a world-class regatta and Ireland's best Olympic class result in 30 years.

Radial European Gold

Murphy won her first major medal at an international event the following year on home waters when she won gold at the 2013 European Sailing Championships on Dublin Bay.

Typically, her track record continues to show that she performs best in strong breezes that suit her large stature (height: 1.86 m Weight: 72 kg).

She had many international successes on her road to Rio 2016 but also some serious setbacks including a silver fleet finish in flukey winds at the world championships in the April of Olympic year itself.

Olympic Silver Medal

On 16 August 2016, Murphy won the silver medal in the Laser Radial at the 2016 Summer Olympics defying many who said her weight and size would go against her in Rio's light winds.

As Irish Times Sailing Correspondent David O'Brien pointed out: " [The medal] was made all the more significant because her string of consistent results was achieved in a variety of conditions, the hallmark of a great sailor. The medal race itself was a sailing master class by the Dubliner in some decidedly fickle conditions under Sugarloaf mountain".

It was true that her eight-year voyage ended with a silver lining but even then Murphy was plotting to go one better in Tokyo four years later.

Sportswoman of the Year

In December 2016, she was honoured as the Irish Times/Sport Ireland 2016 Sportswoman of the Year.

In March, 2017, Annalise Murphy was chosen as the grand marshal of the Dublin St Patrick's day parade in recognition of her achievement at the Rio Olympics.

She became the Female World Champion at the Moth Worlds in July 2017 in Italy but it came at a high price for the Olympic Silver medallist. A violent capsize in the last race caused her to sustain a knee injury which subsequent scans revealed to be serious. 

Volvo Ocean Race

The injury was a blow for her return to the Olympic Laser Radial discipline and she withdrew from the 2017 World Championships. But, later that August, to the surprise of many, Murphy put her Tokyo 2020 ambitions on hold for a Volvo Ocean Race crew spot and joined Dee Caffari’s new Turn the Tide On Plastic team that would ultimately finish sixth from seventh overall in a global circumnavigation odyssey.

Quits Radial for 49erFX

There were further raised eyebrows nine months later when, during a break in Volvo Ocean Race proceedings, in May 2018 Murphy announced she was quitting the Laser Radial dinghy and was launching a 49er FX campaign for Tokyo 2020. Critics said she had left too little time to get up to speed for Tokyo in a new double-handed class.

After a 'hugely challenging' fourteen months for Murphy and her crew Katie Tingle, it was decided after the 2019 summer season that their 'Olympic medal goal' was no longer realistic, and the campaign came to an end. Murphy saying in interviews “I guess the World Cup in Japan was a bit of a wakeup call for me, I was unable to see a medal in less than twelve months and that was always the goal".

The pair raced in just six major regattas in a six-month timeframe. 

Return to Radial

In September 2019, Murphy returned to the Laser Radial dinghy and lead a four-way trial for the Tokyo 2020 Irish Olympic spot after the first of three trials when she finished 12th at the Melbourne World Championships in February 2020.

Selection for Tokyo 2021

On June 11, Irish Sailing announced Annalise Murphy had been nominated in the Laser Radial to compete at the Tokyo Olympics in 2021. Murphy secured the Laser Radial nomination after the conclusion of a cut short trials in which rivals Aoife Hopkins, Aisling Keller and Eve McMahon also competed.

Disappointment at Tokyo 2021

After her third Olympic Regatta, there was disappointment for Murphy who finished 18th overall in Tokyo. On coming ashore after the last race, she indicated her intention to return to studies and retire from Olympic sailing.  

On 6th Aguust 2020, Murphy wrote on Facebook:  "I am finally back home and it’s been a week since I finished racing, I have been lucky enough to experience the highs and the lows of the Olympics. I am really disappointed, I can’t pretend that I am not. I wasn’t good enough last week, the more mistakes I made the more I lost confidence in my decision making. Two years ago I made a plan to try and win a gold medal in the Radial, I believed that with my work ethic and attitude to learning, that everything would work out for me. It didn’t work out this time but I do believe that it’s worth dreaming of winning Olympic medals as I’m proof that it is possible, I also know how scary it is to try knowing you might not be good enough!
I am disappointed for Rory who has been my coach for 15 years, we’ve had some great times together and I wish I could have finished that on a high. I have so much respect for Olympic sailing coaches. They also have to dedicate their lives to getting to the games. I know I’ll always appreciate the impact Rory has had on my life as a person.
I am so grateful for the support I have got from my family and friends, I have definitely been selfish with my time all these years and I hope I can now make that up to you all! Thanks to Kate, Mark and Rónán for always having my back! Thank you to my sponsors for believing in me and supporting me. Thank you Tokyo for making these games happen! It means so much to the athletes to get this chance to do the Olympics.
I am not too sure what is next for me, I definitely don’t hate sailing which is a positive. I love this sport, even when it doesn’t love me 😂. Thank you everyone for all the kind words I am finally getting a chance to read!"

Annalise Murphy, Olympic Sailor FAQs

Annalise Murphy is Ireland’s best performing sailor at Olympic level, with a silver medal in the Laser Radial from Rio 2016.

Annalise Murphy is from Rathfarnham, a suburb in south Co Dublin with a population of some 17,000.

Annalise Murphy was born on 1 February 1990, which makes her 30 years old as of 2020.

Annalise Murphy’s main competition class is the Laser Radial. Annalise has also competed in the 49erFX two-handed class, and has raced foiling Moths at international level. In 2017, she raced around the world in the Volvo Ocean Race.

In May 2018, Annalise Murphy announced she was quitting the Laser Radial and launching a campaign for Tokyo 2020 in the 49erFX with friend Katie Tingle. The pairing faced a setback later that year when Tingle broke her arm during training, and they did not see their first competition until April 2019. After a disappointing series of races during the year, Murphy brought their campaign to an end in September 2019 and resumed her campaign for the Laser Radial.

Annalise Murphy is a longtime and honorary member of the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire.

Aside from her Olympic success, Annalise Murphy won gold at the 2013 European Sailing Championships on Dublin Bay.

So far Annalise Murphy has represented Ireland at two Olympic Games.

Annalise Murphy has one Olympic medal, a silver in the Women’s Laser Radial from Rio 2016.

Yes; on 11 June 2020, Irish Sailing announced Annalise Murphy had been nominated in the Women’s Laser Radial to compete at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games in 2021.

Yes; in December 2016, Annalise Murphy was honoured as the Irish Times/Sport Ireland 2016 Sportswoman of the Year. In the same year, she was also awarded Irish Sailor of the Year.

Yes, Annalise Murphy crewed on eight legs of the 2017-18 edition of The Ocean Race.

Annalise Murphy was a crew member on Turn the Tide on Plastic, skippered by British offshore sailor Dee Caffari.

Annalise Murphy’s mother is Cathy McAleavy, who competed as a sailor in the 470 class at the Olympic Games in Seoul in 1988.

Annalise Murphy’s father is Con Murphy, a pilot by profession who is also an Olympic sailing race official.

Annalise Murphy trains under Irish Sailing Performance head coach Rory Fitzpatrick, with whom she also prepared for her silver medal performance in Rio 2016.

Annalise Murphy trains with the rest of the team based at the Irish Sailing Performance HQ in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

Annalise Murphy height is billed as 6 ft 1 in, or 183cm.

©Afloat 2020

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At A Glance – Annalise Murphy Significant Results

2016: Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Silver

2013: European Championships, Dublin, Ireland – Gold

2012: Summer Olympics, London, UK – 4th

2011: World Championships, Perth, Australia – 6th

2010: Skandia Sail for Gold regatta – 10th

2010: Became the first woman to win the Irish National Championships.

2009: World Championships – 8th

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