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Displaying items by tag: Ports & Shipping Review

#ShippingReview – Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene where among the stories are outlined below.

This year’s theme of World Maritime Day was “Maritime education and training” which was celebrated at the International Maritime Organisation's (IMO) headquarters in London and where other events will be held throughout the year.

d’Amico Tankers Ltd Ireland order construction and sale of two 75,000dwt product tankers with a Korean yard as part of a $755m fleet deal.

Afloat revealed as to the name chosen for Arklow Shipping’s second Royal Bodewes 5,100dwt trader cargoship currently under construction. She will be christened Arklow View and follows the launch of the leadship last month.

Consultants have been appointed by Rosslare Europort to evaluate the market interest of operating the harbour on a consession basis.

It was the place to be as 150 people attended the second Irish Maritime Forum held at the NMCI, Ringaskiddy, where speakers represented organisations and professionals from the broad Maritime Industry in Ireland.

The expansion of Galway Port faces an environmental hurdle, as parts of the plan would have a significant adverse impact on Galway Bay, said An Bord Pleanála in advance of next week's expected decision that already been delayed for many months.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview – Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported from the shipping scene, where Arklow Shipping's fifth out of six 'B' class 'green' newbuilds Arklow Brave was launched in the Netherlands.

Another newbuild, German built Loch Seaforth carried out sea trials in the Irish Sea for Scottish ferry operator CalMac, which involved departing the Clyde and heading south as far as the Codling Bank offshore of Wicklow Head.

The Permanent Representatives Committee reached agreement with European Parliament on new EU-wide rules regarding CO2 emissions from ships.

A sister of Anvil Point, the last ship to be built in Belfast by Harland & Wolff in 2003, the Dorset docked in Dublin Port having entered service for Colbelfret's (CLnD Ro-Ro) service from Zeebrugge.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where former officers, crew and staff attended a reunion to mark the 30th anniversary of Irish Shipping Ltd, the state company which went into liquidation in 1984.

The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) released figures that showed container shipping volumes, Lo/Lo have risen by 9% in the third quarter of 2014.

Arklow Shipping's fifth out of six B class general cargo 'green' newbuilds, Arklow Brave is to be christened and launched next month at a Dutch shipyard.

French global containership giant, CMA CGM in the third quarter, announced net profit of $201m as cargo volumes reached an all-time high and order for six mega 18,000TEU capacity ships due 2015.

Published in Arklow Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where the European Sea Port Organisation (ESPO) re-elected Garcia-Milà as Chairman following a vote of the organisation's General Assembly held in Brussels.

Tanker fleet operator Ardmore Shipping Corporation announced financial results and a $20 million Share Repurchase Plan.

As referred above ESPO, has awarded this year the Slovenian port of Koper in recognition of its environmental work in creating a sustainable future for the port and its surroundings.

The name of the contractor for a €10m plus upgrade of the east jetty at Foynes will be announced shortly by Shannon Foynes Port Company.

Within a fortnight two separate incidents involving a pair of vessels berthed in Warrenpoint, took place at the Co. Down port. The first incident was an oil spill followed by an overheating cargo of animal feed.

A cargoship currently berthed in Dublin Port, Arklow Willow has a similar name to a former Irish Shipping Ltd vessel, the Irish Willow. The timing is apt given yesterday a staff reunion in the capital marked the 30th anniversay of the liquidation of Irish Shipping Ltd.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where Warrenpoint Harbour  call for funding to construct relief road to avoid traveling through Newry City.

The European Sea Ports Organisation (ESPO) recognised the Italian Presidency efforts at the Transport Council to reach an agreement on Port Regulation proposals.

Shannon Foynes Port Company announced record profits for 2013, the fourth successive year in such growth, showing a 3% increase in Operating Profit at €4.1m, up from €3.1m in 2012.

Government to back Galway Harbour's €52 million redevelopment of a first phase of a port expansion.

The IMDO release report Irish Tonnage Tax: Opportunities for the International Shipping Industry. The independent report by PwC details the benefits of the tax regime established in 2004 and the attractions of maritime operations locating in Ireland.

Dublin Graving Docks Ltd faces closure as Dublin Port Company plan a €200m Alexandra Basin Redevelpment Project that incorporates the site of the 200m long graving dock. Currently the dry-dock is occupied by Arklow Ranger and Jeanie Johnston.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview - Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where The International Offshore Patrol Vessels Conference was held in Dublin, the three-day event was chaired by Rear Admiral Mark Mellett of the Naval Service.

Councillors at a Western Committee meeting held in Cork, were informed the start date for the redevelopment plans for Bantry Harbour costing up to €7m would not be until at least 2016.

Also in Cork city, more than 150 delegates from the maritime industry attended the inaugural Irish Maritime Forum hosted by the Port of Cork, in partnership with the Irish Ports Association (IPA).

It was then the turn of the IPA's counterpart in the UK, the British Ports Association (BPA) which held their annual conference yesterday which was hosted by Warrenpoint Harbour Authority in Newcastle, Co. Down.

The National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) celebrated its tenth anniversary.  As a provider of world class maritime education and training, an event to mark the occasion was to be led yesterday by Minister for Marine & Defence, Simon Coveney, TD.

Samskip CEO, Diederick Blom has said the increasing cost of new low-sulphur fuel from the regulations 'may drive a shift back to road transport on certain European shortsea routes'.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where the EU adopts a plan to improve customs risk management.

A Port of Cork proposal for a €100m upgrade at Ringaskiddy for a container terminal is to be heard by An Bord Pleanala on 10 September.

Newbuild oil products tanker, Kestral Fisher the second of a pair of 7,072dwt vessels managed by UK based James Fisher Everard docked in Dublin Port.

LD Lines cease operating Ireland-Spain ro-ro ferry services. The 'landbridge' service via France was a historic first to link the nations when launched at the start of this year.

Irish Ferries part of the Irish Continental Group (ICG) release half-year financial report. Since the introduction of ro-pax Epsilon on Welsh and French ferry services, there has been substantial growth from both freight and tourism business.  

An historic first for Waterford City Quays, as a record total of three cruiseships bringing more than 900 passengers and 500 crew visited the region.

Manx based Mezeron Freight Services 'classic' coaster cargoship, Silver River (1968/277grt) returned to the Irish Sea following a marine class survey in a Polish shipyard.

Arklow Beacon, the fourth of six 4,800dwt newbuild bulk cargoships, featuring a hull form with 'green' credentials is to be launched at a Dutch yard later this month.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where Dublin Port Company and investment company One51 are to sale Greenore Port.

It further transpired that the strategic port on the shores of Carlingford Lough drew the attention of the Burke Shipping Group, as a bidder in the final stages for the Co Louth port.

The Irish ports and shipping sectors saw a 2% rise in volumes in the Q2 of 2014 when compared to same period in 2013. The latest quarterly results from iShips Index were published by the IMDO.

An example of international shipping trading to Irish ports was the 57,000 tonnes Italian operated ro-ro multi-purpose Grande Atlantico. She  anchored in Dublin Bay fresh from an overhaul prior to resuming her Northern Europe-West African 'liner' service.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported from the shipping scene, where the Port of Cork's turnover increased by over 6% in 2013.

The Inishowen Peninsula in Co. Donegal is set to cash in on the lucrative cruise ship sector following investment to upgrade facilities at Greencastle Harbour.

Warrenpoint Port is on its way to economic recovery as a rise in trading activity saw the Co. Down port record a doubling of pre-tax profits to around £850,000 in 2013.

The port on Carlingford Lough welcomed Saga Pearl II, the first ever cruise ship last month and in October the port is to host the 2014 British Ports Association Conference.

Arklow Bank the leadship of six 'B' class 'greener' newbuilds of the Arklow Shipping fleet called to Dublin Port this week. She departed last night laden with a cargo from the Boliden Tara Mines terminal and is bound for Odda, Norway.

 

Published in Warrenpoint Port

#Ports&ShippingReview: Over the last fortnight, Jehan Ashmore has reported on the shipping scene, where the Port of Cork is to host the first Irish Maritime Forum on 26 September.

The forum themed 'Developing the Dynamic Future for Ireland's Maritime Sector' will focus on exploring the future of the maritime sector within Ireland and will look closely at the challenges and opportunities faced by many within the sector.

Having made an anchorage call off Galway Harbour, Holland America Line's 800 passenger Prinsendam and her fleet of tenders leave in their wake strong ties with the mid-west port.

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport,Paschal Donohoe TD, and the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Richard Bruton TD, announced the ratification by Ireland of the Maritime Labour Convention, which sets standards for working and living conditions for seafarers.

Dublin Port Company's 2013 Annual Report is now available as an 'online' version. The report in both Irish and English is downloadable in PDF format as well as an HTML version are now available through this LINK.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping
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Irish Olympic Sailing Team

Ireland has a proud representation in sailing at the Olympics dating back to 1948. Today there is a modern governing structure surrounding the selection of sailors the Olympic Regatta

Irish Olympic Sailing FAQs

Ireland’s representation in sailing at the Olympics dates back to 1948, when a team consisting of Jimmy Mooney (Firefly), Alf Delany and Hugh Allen (Swallow) competed in that year’s Summer Games in London (sailing off Torquay). Except for the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Ireland has sent at least one sailor to every Summer Games since then.

  • 1948 – London (Torquay) — Firefly: Jimmy Mooney; Swallow: Alf Delany, Hugh Allen
  • 1952 – Helsinki — Finn: Alf Delany * 1956 – Melbourne — Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1960 – Rome — Flying Dutchman: Johnny Hooper, Peter Gray; Dragon: Jimmy Mooney, David Ryder, Robin Benson; Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1964 – Tokyo — Dragon: Eddie Kelliher, Harry Maguire, Rob Dalton; Finn: Johnny Hooper 
  • 1972 – Munich (Kiel) — Tempest: David Wilkins, Sean Whitaker; Dragon: Robin Hennessy, Harry Byrne, Owen Delany; Finn: Kevin McLaverty; Flying Dutchman: Harold Cudmore, Richard O’Shea
  • 1976 – Montreal (Kingston) — 470: Robert Dix, Peter Dix; Flying Dutchman: Barry O’Neill, Jamie Wilkinson; Tempest: David Wilkins, Derek Jago
  • 1980 – Moscow (Tallinn) — Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson (Silver medalists) * 1984 – Los Angeles — Finn: Bill O’Hara
  • 1988 – Seoul (Pusan) — Finn: Bill O’Hara; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; 470 (Women): Cathy MacAleavy, Aisling Byrne
  • 1992 – Barcelona — Europe: Denise Lyttle; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; Star: Mark Mansfield, Tom McWilliam
  • 1996 – Atlanta (Savannah) — Laser: Mark Lyttle; Europe: Aisling Bowman (Byrne); Finn: John Driscoll; Star: Mark Mansfield, David Burrows; 470 (Women): Denise Lyttle, Louise Cole; Soling: Marshall King, Dan O’Grady, Garrett Connolly
  • 2000 – Sydney — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, David O'Brien
  • 2004 – Athens — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, Killian Collins; 49er: Tom Fitzpatrick, Fraser Brown; 470: Gerald Owens, Ross Killian; Laser: Rory Fitzpatrick
  • 2008 – Beijing (Qingdao) — Star: Peter O’Leary, Stephen Milne; Finn: Tim Goodbody; Laser Radial: Ciara Peelo; 470: Gerald Owens, Phil Lawton
  • 2012 – London (Weymouth) — Star: Peter O’Leary, David Burrows; 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; Laser Radial: Annalise Murphy; Laser: James Espey; 470: Gerald Owens, Scott Flanigan
  • 2016 – Rio — Laser Radial (Women): Annalise Murphy (Silver medalist); 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; 49erFX: Andrea Brewster, Saskia Tidey; Laser: Finn Lynch; Paralympic Sonar: John Twomey, Ian Costello & Austin O’Carroll

Ireland has won two Olympics medals in sailing events, both silver: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson in the Flying Dutchman at Moscow 1980, and Annalise Murphy in the Laser Radial at Rio 2016.

The current team, as of December 2020, consists of Laser sailors Finn Lynch, Liam Glynn and Ewan McMahon, 49er pairs Ryan Seaton and Seafra Guilfoyle, and Sean Waddilove and Robert Dickson, as well as Laser Radial sailors Annalise Murphy and Aoife Hopkins.

Irish Sailing is the National Governing Body for sailing in Ireland.

Irish Sailing’s Performance division is responsible for selecting and nurturing Olympic contenders as part of its Performance Pathway.

The Performance Pathway is Irish Sailing’s Olympic talent pipeline. The Performance Pathway counts over 70 sailors from 11 years up in its programme.The Performance Pathway is made up of Junior, Youth, Academy, Development and Olympic squads. It provides young, talented and ambitious Irish sailors with opportunities to move up through the ranks from an early age. With up to 100 young athletes training with the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway, every aspect of their performance is planned and closely monitored while strong relationships are simultaneously built with the sailors and their families

Rory Fitzpatrick is the head coach of Irish Sailing Performance. He is a graduate of University College Dublin and was an Athens 2004 Olympian in the Laser class.

The Performance Director of Irish Sailing is James O’Callaghan. Since 2006 James has been responsible for the development and delivery of athlete-focused, coach-led, performance-measured programmes across the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway. A Business & Economics graduate of Trinity College Dublin, he is a Level 3 Qualified Coach and Level 2 Coach Tutor. He has coached at five Olympic Games and numerous European and World Championship events across multiple Olympic classes. He is also a member of the Irish Sailing Foundation board.

Annalise Murphy is by far and away the biggest Irish sailing star. Her fourth in London 2012 when she came so agonisingly close to a bronze medal followed by her superb silver medal performance four years later at Rio won the hearts of Ireland. Murphy is aiming to go one better in Tokyo 2021. 

Under head coach Rory Fitzpatrick, the coaching staff consists of Laser Radial Academy coach Sean Evans, Olympic Laser coach Vasilij Zbogar and 49er team coach Matt McGovern.

The Irish Government provides funding to Irish Sailing. These funds are exclusively for the benefit of the Performance Pathway. However, this falls short of the amount required to fund the Performance Pathway in order to allow Ireland compete at the highest level. As a result the Performance Pathway programme currently receives around €850,000 per annum from Sport Ireland and €150,000 from sponsorship. A further €2 million per annum is needed to have a major impact at the highest level. The Irish Sailing Foundation was established to bridge the financial gap through securing philanthropic donations, corporate giving and sponsorship.

The vision of the Irish Sailing Foundation is to generate the required financial resources for Ireland to scale-up and execute its world-class sailing programme. Irish Sailing works tirelessly to promote sailing in Ireland and abroad and has been successful in securing funding of 1 million euro from Sport Ireland. However, to compete on a par with other nations, a further €2 million is required annually to realise the ambitions of our talented sailors. For this reason, the Irish Sailing Foundation was formed to seek philanthropic donations. Led by a Board of Directors and Head of Development Kathryn Grace, the foundation lads a campaign to bridge the financial gap to provide the Performance Pathway with the funds necessary to increase coaching hours, upgrade equipment and provide world class sport science support to a greater number of high-potential Irish sailors.

The Senior and Academy teams of the Performance Pathway are supported with the provision of a coach, vehicle, coach boat and boats. Even with this level of subsidy there is still a large financial burden on individual families due to travel costs, entry fees and accommodation. There are often compromises made on the amount of days a coach can be hired for and on many occasions it is necessary to opt out of major competitions outside Europe due to cost. Money raised by the Irish Sailing Foundation will go towards increased quality coaching time, world-class equipment, and subsiding entry fees and travel-related costs. It also goes towards broadening the base of talented sailors that can consider campaigning by removing financial hurdles, and the Performance HQ in Dublin to increase efficiency and reduce logistical issues.

The ethos of the Performance Pathway is progression. At each stage international performance benchmarks are utilised to ensure the sailors are meeting expectations set. The size of a sailor will generally dictate which boat they sail. The classes selected on the pathway have been identified as the best feeder classes for progression. Currently the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway consists of the following groups: * Pathway (U15) Optimist and Topper * Youth Academy (U19) Laser 4.7, Laser Radial and 420 * Development Academy (U23) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX * Team IRL (direct-funded athletes) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX

The Irish Sailing performance director produces a detailed annual budget for the programme which is presented to Sport Ireland, Irish Sailing and the Foundation for detailed discussion and analysis of the programme, where each item of expenditure is reviewed and approved. Each year, the performance director drafts a Performance Plan and Budget designed to meet the objectives of Irish Performance Sailing based on an annual review of the Pathway Programmes from Junior to Olympic level. The plan is then presented to the Olympic Steering Group (OSG) where it is independently assessed and the budget is agreed. The OSG closely monitors the delivery of the plan ensuring it meets the agreed strategy, is within budget and in line with operational plans. The performance director communicates on an ongoing basis with the OSG throughout the year, reporting formally on a quarterly basis.

Due to the specialised nature of Performance Sport, Irish Sailing established an expert sub-committee which is referred to as the Olympic Steering Group (OSG). The OSG is chaired by Patrick Coveney and its objective is centred around winning Olympic medals so it oversees the delivery of the Irish Sailing’s Performance plan.

At Junior level (U15) sailors learn not only to be a sailor but also an athlete. They develop the discipline required to keep a training log while undertaking fitness programmes, attending coaching sessions and travelling to competitions. During the winter Regional Squads take place and then in spring the National Squads are selected for Summer Competitions. As sailors move into Youth level (U19) there is an exhaustive selection matrix used when considering a sailor for entry into the Performance Academy. Completion of club training programmes, attendance at the performance seminars, physical suitability and also progress at Junior and Youth competitions are assessed and reviewed. Once invited in to the Performance Academy, sailors are given a six-month trial before a final decision is made on their selection. Sailors in the Academy are very closely monitored and engage in a very well planned out sailing, training and competition programme. There are also defined international benchmarks which these sailors are required to meet by a certain age. Biannual reviews are conducted transparently with the sailors so they know exactly where they are performing well and they are made aware of where they may need to improve before the next review.

©Afloat 2020