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Displaying items by tag: IFDS

#IFDS - Ten-time Irish Paralympian John Twomey has resigned as president of the International Association for Disabled Sailing (IFDS), as Olympics news site Inside The Games reports.

Afloat's Sailor of the Month for August 2013 departs from his role after sailing's axing from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics was confirmed after a review by the ISAF.

Though the ISAF, with which the IFDS merged last year, says it "will continue to work hard to reinstate sailing" in future Paralympics, that charge will now be headed by Twomey's interim replacement Bernard Destrubé – who paid tribute to the Kinsale sailor's leadership during a tumultuous time for the parasport.

Inside The Games has more on the story HERE.

Published in Olympic

#IFDS - The International Association for Disabled Sailing (IFDS) has agreed to a merger with the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) that will secure the future of competitive sailing for athletes with disabilities.

The ISAF's official website explains that the merger, to be completed in 12 months' time, will create a single governing body for member national authorities and sailors alike "to better serve the needs and interests of sailors with disabilities".

IFDS president and former Irish Paralympian John Twomey said he was "delighted" at the agreement and said he and his team "look forward to implementing" the new alliance, which would provide for consistent regulations across all sailing classes, both able bodied and differently abled.

The functions of the current IFDS leadership will be replaced by a new IFDS Committee within the ISAF Annual Conference schedule, and the IFDS chair will hold a full voting seat on the ISAF Council.

In addition, the IFDS will retain responsibility for the Paralympic Sailing Competition, including event and equipment selection as well as the IFDS World Championships - staged this summer in Kinsale.

The merger news comes just four months after Twomey warned of the potential bankruptcy of the IFDS, arising from the substantial legal costs incurred in an action over the results of the Sonar class at the 2012 Paralympics.

Published in World Sailing
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#ifds – What a week we have all enjoyed at Kinsale Yacht Club who ran a superb event that was enjoyed by all and sundry who had any connection with the Regatta writes Claire Bateman. It was no easy feat and John Stallard, the Event Director, must be a very happy and relieved man tonight. Sure we had two days when there was no sailing but Kinsale being what it is, the competitors were able to enjoy the wonderful facilities that Kinsale is famous for, not least being known as the gourmet capital of Ireland and set in some of the most glorious scenic areas in the locality. The forecast was uncanny in its accuracy and nobody had any doubts that there was going to be wind to enable a series to be completed and so it was.

Tuesday and Thursday produced unbeatable sailing conditions with sun, wind and hugely exhilarating conditions. Here again Kinsale are blessed with the fact that they have Bullen Bay where they sailed the 2.4Rs where these small boats, looking like miniature 12 metres, were able to sail comfortably without having to endure too much swell.

Today, the last day, produced the first rain and drizzle of the series that pretty well obscured the usual landmarks and even a very large black ship outside the sailing area was barely visible and the conditions must have been especially tough for the gallant sailors in the 2.4mRs. However, the rain and drizzle lifted and in some twelve knots of breeze the Sonars got in three races with the other two fleets getting in two races each.

The most eagerly and tensely awaited race was the final race for the 2.4mR class which was fought out all week between Heiko Kroger from Germany and Guus Bijlard from the Netherlands tied on equal points the top of the fleet and being hotly pursued by Damien Seguin from France. Finally it was Kroger, Billard and Seguin in that order making Heiko Kroger of Germany the 2.4mR World Champion.

In the Sonars it was obvious from the very start that the wily French sailor, Bruno Jourdren was not going to let anyone stand in his way. The French are so into their sailing and are really excellent and very hard to beat. He never allowed anyone to have a look in for the series and no matter how hard Udo Hessels from the Netherlands tried to break the French man's hold he could not succeed and had to settle for second place with the Australian sailor Colin Harrison taking the bronze with Bruno Jourdren is now the Sonar Class World Champion. IFDS President John Twomey of KinsaleYC finished in ninth position.

In the SKUD 18 fleet Alexandra Rickham and Niki Birrell with their unmistakable green kite were the unstoppable winners and took the world title with Italy's Marco Gualandris second and John McRoberts of Canada settling for bronze.

With such a successful event for Kinsale would it be too much to ask that we might see the competition return there at some future date?

Published in Olympic
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#ifds – Today the wind was up and the sun was shining and from early on there was certainly no sign of competitors and officials relaxing with coffee around the Kinsale Yacht Club writes Claire Bateman. Every one had gone to sea fully ready for action and determined to get the most out of the day. They were not to be disappointed.

The weather forecasters had got it spot on and a nice south westerly wind of about ten knots filled in and the Race Officers were anxious to get up and running.

Your intrepid photographer and scribe had been slightly delayed getting to Kinsale this am and as a result were in fact last leaving the marina . However, we managed to arrive bang on time and went first to the Sonar fleet who were in sequence. Here all praise must be given to the Race Officers and mark laying boats for all the fleets and they should certainly sleep well tonight. The slickness and timing of the entire operation had to be seen to be believed. In fact the two Race Officers were starting their races exactly on their scheduled times.

It was good to see Irish IFDS President, John Twomey getting off to an excellent start and rounding the first windward mark in third place. The Sonar Class have now completed six races and it is the French team of Bruno Lourdren, Eric Flageul and Nicolas Vimont-Vicary who are current leaders on seven points after one discard. They are followed by NED 1 helmed by Udo Hessels and crewed by Mischa Rossen and Marc el van de Veen on eighteen points. In third place is AUS 1 helmed by Colin Harrison, crewed by Jonathon Harris and Russell Boaden on twenty points. The top Irish score in the class is IFDS President John Twomey crewed by Ian Costelloe and Anthony Hegarty on thirty points. .

In the SKUD Class The battle is between Alexandra Rickham and crew Niki Birrell from the UK , the Italian team led by Marco Gualandrias and John Mcroberts of Canada in first, second and third places respectively. The British team are now counting four first places with the Italians counting a first and three seconds and Canada counting two seconds and two thirds.

Meanwhile in the 2.4mR class Heiko Kroger of Germany had two wins today and results are showing him in second place with Bijilard Guus NED in first place However, the other NED competitor Barend Kol is third place on equal points with Heiko Kroger while in the latter two races today Helena Lucas of Britain, Gold Medalist London 2012 was getting into her stride with a second and a first and it would be a foolish person that would write her off at this stage.

So, it is all to play for tomorrow and will make for a very interesting and nail biting day indeed.

Published in Olympic
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#ifds – Another fairly windless day in Kinsale yesterday morning with just a light breeze greeting the competitors in the Cork County Council IFDS Championships writes Claire Bateman. However, it was all extremely enjoyable with a lovely convivial atmosphere and most people enjoying their morning coffee while the postponement flag was flying. Suddenly the harsh sound of a hooter alerted all present to the fact the flag had been lowered and one could not believe the speed with which the clubhouse, marina and surrounds that had been packed were suddenly empty and silent.

Competitors needing assistance to get to their boats were speedily surrounded by their helpers and within what seemed like a matter of minutes the fleets were all heading to sea. Also disappearing with the speed of light were the committee boats, the support RIBS, jury RIBS, etc. and the event was on or, was it? To be or not to be, that was the question.

The first attempt at a start was on the Sonar course east of Kinsale. Race Officer Peter Crowley tried a start with a north westerly wind blowing but unfortunately the wind died half the way up the beat and that race had to be abandoned. After a short delay the wind that had been off the land had filled in from the sea with a nice 8/10knot south westerly breeze enabling a start for all three classes and they finished the day with three good races.

The Sonar fleet included Kinsale's own John Twomey, a veteran paralympian, and his crew Anthony Hegarty and Ian Costelloe, and Paul McCarthy and his crew Brian O'Mahony and Paul Ryan. The Sonar fleet also included Amy Kelehan, who previously raced in the SKUD fleet, and her crew Jacqui Browne and Austin O'Carroll.

The start line for the 2.4M s was quite something with all forty two of the lean mean machines like miniature 12 metres making their charge for the line. 

On the 2.4mR and SKUD 18 class courses, two races were completed when the wind eventually filled in. In the nine boat SKUD 18 fleet it was a second and a first for Italian Marco Gualandris who is now the leader overnight followed by the London 2012 bronze medalist Alexanda Rickham UK and John McRoberts from RVYC in Canada.

For full results see here.

Published in Olympic

#ifds – The practice race for the IFDS World Paralympic Sailing Championships was designated for today at 12 noon writes Claire Bateman.

Well, what a day it turned out to be. Before getting anywhere near Kinsale Yacht Club the town was buzzing.

There was a sense of something big happening on the day and I don't think a single person can have been disappointed.

Closer towards the yacht club the excitement became more and more palpable but everything seemed extremely orderly and well in hand. Competitors, officials and all connected with the organisation of the event went about their business in a very methodical manner as everything had obviously been planned with military precision for months under the stewardship of John Stallard, a former KYC Club Commodore and a veteran of many events of which Kinsale YC can be justly proud.

The seagoing vista was practically indescribable with brilliant sunshine, a nor westerly breeze making for wonderful sailing opportunities with great flat water sailing on gleaming waters, and all surrounded by the magnificent scenery that is synomous with Kinsale. One very noticeable item was the fact that every competitor had a smile and wave for everyone and that is certainly more than one could expect from many of the forty footers sailing in competition. None of this is to say that the calibre of competition for this event is not exceptionally high as these fleets rank among some of the most competitive in the world.

In the Sonar class, London 2012 Bronze medallist Norway's Aleksander Wang-Hansen did not compete in the practice race however the London 2012 Gold medallist Udo Hessels started and finished mid-fleet. Corkman Paul McCarthy on IRL697 had a good race finishing in second place but the race was won by USA's Rick Doerr and his crew. Irish Paralympian John Twomey, Anthony Hegarty and Ian Costello finished in 7th place.

On Course B, in the singlehanded 2.4mR class, 39 of the 46 competitors took part in today's practice race with Germany's Heiko Kroeger, who won silver at London 2012, getting the bullet. He was followed by Damien Seguin from France and Italian Antonio Squizzato in third. Helena Lucas from the UK who won Gold in Weymouth did not participate in today's race.

Also on Course B the nine Skud 18 sailors completed their race with John McRoberts from Royal Victoria Yacht Club in Canada taking line honours. The Netherlands' Vera Voorbach was second and Italy's Marco Gualandris third.

It would of course be impossible to name all the outstanding world championship names competing at Kinsale. It will be of huge interest to see how everybody fares and all that remains is to wish each and everyone fair winds and good sailing for the week.

The opening ceremony took place at 6pm this evening

Published in Olympic
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#IFDS – After months of preparation the IFDS world disabled sailing championships gets underway today in Kinsale, County Cork. Ireland will be represented in the competiton by Kinsale local and world IFDS president John Twomey, a ten time paralympian.

The event will be officially opened on Sunday 25th August at 6pm in the James O'Neill Memorial building in the centre of Kinsale by Mayor of Kinsale Cllr Tony Cierans and Cork MEP Brian Crowley. A parade to Kinsale Yacht Club to present nation's flags will follow the official opening.

There will be a practice race on Sunday 25th August at noon and racing will commence on Monday 26th August with two races scheduled daily starting at 12 noon until Friday 30th August.

The organising committee, led by Regatta Director John Stallard, have been working solidly for over two years to host this major event. Kinsale Yacht Club was redeveloped in the last year without grants and public funding and €800,000 was invested through fundraising by the members and a bank loan that was secured.

 

Published in Olympic
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#IFDS – On the eve of the International Federation for Disabled sailing (IFDS) World Sailing Championships being staged in Kinsale, County Cork next month, its President, Irish Paralympian John Twomey, has warned of the potential bankruptcy of the world body arising out of substantial legal costs incurred in an action over the results of the Sonar class at the London 2012 Paralymics.

Writing in the association's latest newsletter Twomey, who became IFDS president at last November's ISAF world sailing conference in Dublin, says the costs involved are 'a major problem for IFDS as we do not currently have sufficient funds to pay for the fees and costs incurred without third party assistance'.

Twomey goes on to say 'the insufficiency of funds could in turn lead to the Executive Committee having to place IFDS in bankruptcy'.

IFDS met with ISAF in London on 2 July 2013 to discuss the possible integration of both organisations. The situation is ongoing, according to the Kinsale based President.

In the recent case, Twomey writes the Arbitrator upheld IFDS's initial contention that CAS lacked jurisdiction in this case and the result of the Sonar class at the London 2012 Paralympic stand. The arbitrator also ruled that the British Paralympic Association (BPA) must reimburse the other parties for the substantial fees paid to CAS, but that each party must pay its own legal fees and costs. In addition to legal fees, IFDS has incurred substantial costs for witness travel and other expenses.

To date entries have been received from 19 countries in the One-Person Keelboat, 2.4mR; 4 countries in the Two-Person Keelboat, SKUD18 and 12 countries in the Three-Person Keelboat, Sonar for the IFDS world championships to be held at Twomey's home waters of Kinsale in August. 

Separately, this week the Irish Paralympic team signed a four year sponsorship deal with Providence Resources for the Rio Games.

 

Published in Olympic

#IFDS – The IFDS World Championships have drawn to a close and Ireland's sailors John Twomey, Anthony Hegarty and Ian Costello have finished seventh overall, a disappointing outcome for the Kinsale trio given they were tied for the top spot at the midpoint of the event.

Over ten races sailed Twomey counted a 1 3 6 4 7 9 [12] 6 9 8 in his 12-boat fleet at International Association for Disabled Sailing (IFDS) event at Laishey Park Marina. Results sheet below.

Twomey's preparations for the London Paralympics continue with Miami World Cup next week.

ifdsworldsresults

Published in Olympics 2012
Tagged under

There have been set backs for the Irish Paralympic crew today in the Sonar Class at Weymouth in the IFDS Worlds writes Claire Bateman.

Crews braved winds of more than 20 knots in Portland Harbour today as Weymouth and Portland's finally lived up to its reputation as a breezy venue after three days of light and fluky airs.

Things are really starting to hot up with two days and three races to go.

shillelagh

Gear failure has dropped Shillelagh to 12th. Photo: Bob Bateman

In spite of the fact that they suffered gear breakages in both races today that saw them slip to 12th place from 9th yesterday, when speaking with John Twomey after racing, he and his crew remained confident of qualifying the Irish spot for the 2012 Paralympics. Eight countries have qualified already and with six places remaining to be filled and, making the calculations, he said, except for disaster, they were very hopeful of making the qualification. He said that in to-day's racing they had to contend with winds of 25 knots making for extremely difficult conditions.

With the breezes well over 20 knots the 155 sailors competing at the RYA-run event at Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy this week were provided today with a completely different challenge to the first three days of racing and with the strong winds now forecast to remain for the rest of the week, the competitors are facing some close to the knuckle sailing. Competition in the Sonar Class is extremely keen and includes top world level sailors. Defending World champion Thierry Schmitter (NED) continued his march to his third consecutive crown with a first and second today, increasing his lead to 17 points over Britain's Helena Lucas. A good day for Schmitter's Dutch team mate Andre Rademaker saw him move into the medal places, as a race eight disqualification for Britain's Megan Pascoe saw her drop to fourth.

Racing continues tomorrow(Thurs) with Races 9 and 10 and will finish with Race 11 on Friday.

Published in Olympics 2012
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Irish Olympic Sailing Team

Ireland has a proud representation in sailing at the Olympics dating back to 1948. Today there is a modern governing structure surrounding the selection of sailors the Olympic Regatta

Irish Olympic Sailing FAQs

Ireland’s representation in sailing at the Olympics dates back to 1948, when a team consisting of Jimmy Mooney (Firefly), Alf Delany and Hugh Allen (Swallow) competed in that year’s Summer Games in London (sailing off Torquay). Except for the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Ireland has sent at least one sailor to every Summer Games since then.

  • 1948 – London (Torquay) — Firefly: Jimmy Mooney; Swallow: Alf Delany, Hugh Allen
  • 1952 – Helsinki — Finn: Alf Delany * 1956 – Melbourne — Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1960 – Rome — Flying Dutchman: Johnny Hooper, Peter Gray; Dragon: Jimmy Mooney, David Ryder, Robin Benson; Finn: J Somers Payne
  • 1964 – Tokyo — Dragon: Eddie Kelliher, Harry Maguire, Rob Dalton; Finn: Johnny Hooper 
  • 1972 – Munich (Kiel) — Tempest: David Wilkins, Sean Whitaker; Dragon: Robin Hennessy, Harry Byrne, Owen Delany; Finn: Kevin McLaverty; Flying Dutchman: Harold Cudmore, Richard O’Shea
  • 1976 – Montreal (Kingston) — 470: Robert Dix, Peter Dix; Flying Dutchman: Barry O’Neill, Jamie Wilkinson; Tempest: David Wilkins, Derek Jago
  • 1980 – Moscow (Tallinn) — Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson (Silver medalists) * 1984 – Los Angeles — Finn: Bill O’Hara
  • 1988 – Seoul (Pusan) — Finn: Bill O’Hara; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; 470 (Women): Cathy MacAleavy, Aisling Byrne
  • 1992 – Barcelona — Europe: Denise Lyttle; Flying Dutchman: David Wilkins, Peter Kennedy; Star: Mark Mansfield, Tom McWilliam
  • 1996 – Atlanta (Savannah) — Laser: Mark Lyttle; Europe: Aisling Bowman (Byrne); Finn: John Driscoll; Star: Mark Mansfield, David Burrows; 470 (Women): Denise Lyttle, Louise Cole; Soling: Marshall King, Dan O’Grady, Garrett Connolly
  • 2000 – Sydney — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, David O'Brien
  • 2004 – Athens — Europe: Maria Coleman; Finn: David Burrows; Star: Mark Mansfield, Killian Collins; 49er: Tom Fitzpatrick, Fraser Brown; 470: Gerald Owens, Ross Killian; Laser: Rory Fitzpatrick
  • 2008 – Beijing (Qingdao) — Star: Peter O’Leary, Stephen Milne; Finn: Tim Goodbody; Laser Radial: Ciara Peelo; 470: Gerald Owens, Phil Lawton
  • 2012 – London (Weymouth) — Star: Peter O’Leary, David Burrows; 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; Laser Radial: Annalise Murphy; Laser: James Espey; 470: Gerald Owens, Scott Flanigan
  • 2016 – Rio — Laser Radial (Women): Annalise Murphy (Silver medalist); 49er: Ryan Seaton, Matt McGovern; 49erFX: Andrea Brewster, Saskia Tidey; Laser: Finn Lynch; Paralympic Sonar: John Twomey, Ian Costello & Austin O’Carroll

Ireland has won two Olympics medals in sailing events, both silver: David Wilkins, Jamie Wilkinson in the Flying Dutchman at Moscow 1980, and Annalise Murphy in the Laser Radial at Rio 2016.

The current team, as of December 2020, consists of Laser sailors Finn Lynch, Liam Glynn and Ewan McMahon, 49er pairs Ryan Seaton and Seafra Guilfoyle, and Sean Waddilove and Robert Dickson, as well as Laser Radial sailors Annalise Murphy and Aoife Hopkins.

Irish Sailing is the National Governing Body for sailing in Ireland.

Irish Sailing’s Performance division is responsible for selecting and nurturing Olympic contenders as part of its Performance Pathway.

The Performance Pathway is Irish Sailing’s Olympic talent pipeline. The Performance Pathway counts over 70 sailors from 11 years up in its programme.The Performance Pathway is made up of Junior, Youth, Academy, Development and Olympic squads. It provides young, talented and ambitious Irish sailors with opportunities to move up through the ranks from an early age. With up to 100 young athletes training with the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway, every aspect of their performance is planned and closely monitored while strong relationships are simultaneously built with the sailors and their families

Rory Fitzpatrick is the head coach of Irish Sailing Performance. He is a graduate of University College Dublin and was an Athens 2004 Olympian in the Laser class.

The Performance Director of Irish Sailing is James O’Callaghan. Since 2006 James has been responsible for the development and delivery of athlete-focused, coach-led, performance-measured programmes across the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway. A Business & Economics graduate of Trinity College Dublin, he is a Level 3 Qualified Coach and Level 2 Coach Tutor. He has coached at five Olympic Games and numerous European and World Championship events across multiple Olympic classes. He is also a member of the Irish Sailing Foundation board.

Annalise Murphy is by far and away the biggest Irish sailing star. Her fourth in London 2012 when she came so agonisingly close to a bronze medal followed by her superb silver medal performance four years later at Rio won the hearts of Ireland. Murphy is aiming to go one better in Tokyo 2021. 

Under head coach Rory Fitzpatrick, the coaching staff consists of Laser Radial Academy coach Sean Evans, Olympic Laser coach Vasilij Zbogar and 49er team coach Matt McGovern.

The Irish Government provides funding to Irish Sailing. These funds are exclusively for the benefit of the Performance Pathway. However, this falls short of the amount required to fund the Performance Pathway in order to allow Ireland compete at the highest level. As a result the Performance Pathway programme currently receives around €850,000 per annum from Sport Ireland and €150,000 from sponsorship. A further €2 million per annum is needed to have a major impact at the highest level. The Irish Sailing Foundation was established to bridge the financial gap through securing philanthropic donations, corporate giving and sponsorship.

The vision of the Irish Sailing Foundation is to generate the required financial resources for Ireland to scale-up and execute its world-class sailing programme. Irish Sailing works tirelessly to promote sailing in Ireland and abroad and has been successful in securing funding of 1 million euro from Sport Ireland. However, to compete on a par with other nations, a further €2 million is required annually to realise the ambitions of our talented sailors. For this reason, the Irish Sailing Foundation was formed to seek philanthropic donations. Led by a Board of Directors and Head of Development Kathryn Grace, the foundation lads a campaign to bridge the financial gap to provide the Performance Pathway with the funds necessary to increase coaching hours, upgrade equipment and provide world class sport science support to a greater number of high-potential Irish sailors.

The Senior and Academy teams of the Performance Pathway are supported with the provision of a coach, vehicle, coach boat and boats. Even with this level of subsidy there is still a large financial burden on individual families due to travel costs, entry fees and accommodation. There are often compromises made on the amount of days a coach can be hired for and on many occasions it is necessary to opt out of major competitions outside Europe due to cost. Money raised by the Irish Sailing Foundation will go towards increased quality coaching time, world-class equipment, and subsiding entry fees and travel-related costs. It also goes towards broadening the base of talented sailors that can consider campaigning by removing financial hurdles, and the Performance HQ in Dublin to increase efficiency and reduce logistical issues.

The ethos of the Performance Pathway is progression. At each stage international performance benchmarks are utilised to ensure the sailors are meeting expectations set. The size of a sailor will generally dictate which boat they sail. The classes selected on the pathway have been identified as the best feeder classes for progression. Currently the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway consists of the following groups: * Pathway (U15) Optimist and Topper * Youth Academy (U19) Laser 4.7, Laser Radial and 420 * Development Academy (U23) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX * Team IRL (direct-funded athletes) Laser, Laser Radial, 49er, 49erFX

The Irish Sailing performance director produces a detailed annual budget for the programme which is presented to Sport Ireland, Irish Sailing and the Foundation for detailed discussion and analysis of the programme, where each item of expenditure is reviewed and approved. Each year, the performance director drafts a Performance Plan and Budget designed to meet the objectives of Irish Performance Sailing based on an annual review of the Pathway Programmes from Junior to Olympic level. The plan is then presented to the Olympic Steering Group (OSG) where it is independently assessed and the budget is agreed. The OSG closely monitors the delivery of the plan ensuring it meets the agreed strategy, is within budget and in line with operational plans. The performance director communicates on an ongoing basis with the OSG throughout the year, reporting formally on a quarterly basis.

Due to the specialised nature of Performance Sport, Irish Sailing established an expert sub-committee which is referred to as the Olympic Steering Group (OSG). The OSG is chaired by Patrick Coveney and its objective is centred around winning Olympic medals so it oversees the delivery of the Irish Sailing’s Performance plan.

At Junior level (U15) sailors learn not only to be a sailor but also an athlete. They develop the discipline required to keep a training log while undertaking fitness programmes, attending coaching sessions and travelling to competitions. During the winter Regional Squads take place and then in spring the National Squads are selected for Summer Competitions. As sailors move into Youth level (U19) there is an exhaustive selection matrix used when considering a sailor for entry into the Performance Academy. Completion of club training programmes, attendance at the performance seminars, physical suitability and also progress at Junior and Youth competitions are assessed and reviewed. Once invited in to the Performance Academy, sailors are given a six-month trial before a final decision is made on their selection. Sailors in the Academy are very closely monitored and engage in a very well planned out sailing, training and competition programme. There are also defined international benchmarks which these sailors are required to meet by a certain age. Biannual reviews are conducted transparently with the sailors so they know exactly where they are performing well and they are made aware of where they may need to improve before the next review.

©Afloat 2020

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