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Displaying items by tag: Ballyholme Yacht Club

The Laser National Championships run by Ballyholme YC on Belfast Lough over the last four days (Thursday 26th - Sunday 29th August) saw a mix of wind conditions with the final day, like the Feva Nationals on Dublin Bay, being blown out for the 120 competitors.

In the Standard Rig, Ronan Wallace (Wexford B & TC) took the title from Robert Espey (Ballyholme YC) and Stpehen Mc Lernon (Cushedall SC).

Annalise Murphy (National YC) won the Radial Championships from Philip Doran (Courtown SC) and Tiffany Brien (Ballyholme YC).

Annalise won 4 of the 8 races sailed including all three in the 16-20 knot breeze on Saturday. The National YC sailor becomes the first female sailor to take the Laser Radial Irish National title.

The 4.7 rig was won by John Flynn (Dungarvan SC) from Colm O Regan (Kinsale YC) and Stephen Duke (Courtown SC). The first girl in the 4.7 was Georgina Corbett (LDYC/NYC).

Published in Racing

The Irish Multihull Championships visit Ballyholme for the bank holiday weekend, and they'll be going the distance, with the even stretching across three days and a variety of formats.

Saturday and Sunday will feature three races each, which won't surprise many, but Monday is a passage race, covering somewhere between 25-40 miles, which will pose a fresh challenge to the fleet.

Catamaran fleets around the world are renowned for being innovators in small boat racing, with the likes of the Worrell 1000, a 1000-mile beach cat race in the US and the Archipelago Raid in the Scandinavian Islands.

Socially it will also have a packed agenda starting with a welcoming family night on the Friday, South African braai barbeques and music.

Full details on the Ballyholme YC website, HERE

Published in Boating Fixtures
28th July 2009

Ballyholme Yacht Club

In the late 19th century several attempts were made to start a second yacht club in Bangor. Royal Ulster Yacht Club had been founded in 1866, membership there limited to the wealthy upper class, many of whom came from outside Bangor. Local people of more limited means, desiring a club for local enthusiasts, set up Bangor Bay Sailing Club, then Bangor Corinthian Sailing Club and finally, in 1900 formed Ballyholme Sailing Club (BSC) and commenced racing in 1901. A Clubhouse was built which stands today as the Kingsland Tennis Pavilion. Sadly, the Club had to close when World War I began as members went to serve in the war, the Clubhouse and its grounds passing into the hands of the local Council.

In 1919, after a regatta at Ballyholme, members of the original BSC decided to revive their club and so it was, in 1920, Ballyholme Yacht Club evolved and thus it has been known to the present day. A wooden clubhouse measuring 18' x 5' was built, consisting of a locker room and battery, expanding in 1938 to include a lounge and basic galley the cost being £100. Membership in 1938 was approximately 170 and the subscription income £80. World War II interrupted further development but the Club still remained active, 1940 being the only year in which no racing was held.

The Club continued to flourish in the post-war years and in 1956 a new Clubhouse (now the Cadet Room) was built at a cost of £2,800 which was, for this era, a state of the art building. The old wooden Clubhouse was demolished in 1963 being replaced by the two-storey building that now includes the office, the lounge and ladies' toilets. In 1971, after long and controversial debate, a bar was opened for the first time, prior to this the Club was 'dry' except for rare occasions. Membership had by now passed the one thousand mark and there was further development for the Club when the North Dinghy Park and slip was completed in 1974/75; the single storey section which houses the Jubilee Room, galley, gents' changing room and showers was completed in 1977. The completion of the Rescue and Training Building in 1996 is the most recent stage in the development of the Club.

Initially racing took place in various handicap classes, then one-design classes appeared; the members built Lake class boats and acquired Waverleys from their original home in Whitehead. Seabirds, Snipes and others came and went, then in 1938 members aspiring to have their own individual one-design class, prompted the building of the Ballyholme One-Design Class. Nine boats were built in Scotland for £80 each and seven of this class are still racing today. The class officially changed its name to the Ballyholme Bay Class in 1948. 

Ballyholme Yacht Club, Seacliff Road, Bangor, Co. Down BT20 5HT. Tel:028 9145 4768. Email: [email protected]

(Details courtesy of Ballyholme Yacht Club)

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Published in Clubs
Page 8 of 8

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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