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Displaying items by tag: Brexit Contingency

#irishports - The Minister for Transport Shane Ross writes Independent.ie is under fire over the readiness of the country's main ports to cope in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Documents released to Fianna Fáil's Robert Troy under Freedom of Information show that the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) only requested an outline of a contingency plan on November 15 last from Dublin and Rosslare ports.

Concern relating to how a crash-out Brexit would affect Dublin Port in particular is evident in the correspondence. Rosslare was asked if there was capacity for it to help out if Dublin Port runs into delays, while Dublin was asked to outline the potential for problems with trade, traffic and delays.

A deadline of November 23 was given to both ports to return the outline plan - just 18 weeks before Britain's scheduled leave date.

For more on the story including traffic plans to and from the Welsh port of Holyhead click here

Published in Irish Ports

#ferryports - Shane Ross the Minister for Transport writes The Irish Times, has admitted that there would be checks on lorries coming into the Republic of Ireland from the UK via Northern Ireland in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

“I would anticipate that there would be checks,” Mr Ross told reporters at a briefing on the Government’s latest plans to deal with the UK crashing out of the EU without an agreement.

The Minister was answering a question about whether a lorry carrying agri-food produce from Scotland into the Republic via Northern Ireland would face border checks.

“Well no,” said Tánaiste Simon Coveney, intervening after Mr Ross answered, saying that the Border would be dealt with through the divorce deal, just hours before the UK parliament overwhelmingly rejected it.

Mr Coveney said that the Government had “deliberately not” gone into contingency plans for dealing with the Border in a no-deal scenario because the UK had not voted on the plan.

“If Britain leaves without a deal well, then we obviously have to difficult discussions with the European Commission and with the UK in terms of how we protect the EU single market,” he said.

The Tánaiste said the Government could discuss no-deal contingency plans for Dublin Port and Rosslare because there was not the same “political sensitivity” around those as with the Border.

Delays At Irish Ferryports 

Mr Ross, setting out transport no-deal contingency plans, conceded that post-Brexit delays on the UK landbridge would be “a major difficulty” for perishable goods or short shelf-life goods.

He identified the Irish, UK and French ports, in particular Dublin, Rosslare, Dover in England and Calais in France, the main “pinch-points” where delays would emerge.

The Minister insisted that “the initial findings” of a review of shipping routes was that there was enough capacity on direct ferries travelling to continental Europe to provide an alternative for Irish importers and exporters to avoid delays on the landbridge from a no-deal Brexit.

Checks at Irish, UK and French ports “could provoke a difficult situation” for the €21 billion worth of goods that rely on the landbridge for €21 billion worth of trade with the EU.

Mr Ross said he was satisfied that the shipping sector “can respond quickly” to meet demands for further capacity on direct sea routes with the EU.

The new Irish Ferries cruiseferry W.B. Yeats (see Afloat's Dublin Port story)  would be “pivotal” in creating more capacity, he added. 

He had two discussions with the company about its decision to cease its Rosslare to France direct route in favour of operating directly from Dublin and this was because of “extra capacity.”

He was “almost certain,” he said, that an inter-department body was considering a simulation exercise, similar to one carried out near Dover, to assess the impact of Brexit-related traffic jams.

Dublin Port, the country’s busiest port, was expecting disruptions in a no-deal scenario, he said.

“The volume of trade with the UK and the scale of the checks required when the UK becomes a third country will likely result in delays of goods moving through the ports,” he said.

He expects no disruptions in air travel to materialise. Ryanair’s “template” to meet post-Brexit EU majority ownership rules was “ready to go” and Aer Lingus was confident that it would comply too.

 

 

Published in Ferry

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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