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Displaying items by tag: Cork County Council

#waterfrontproperty - People in Passage West, reports EchoLive.ie, have reacted with bitter disappointment to the announcement that the local dockyards are no longer to be sold to Cork County Council.

The Evening Echo revealed yesterday that the docks - the location for a major town centre regeneration proposal - has been taken off the market because of uncertainties surrounding Brexit.

The council had been granted €1.9m from the Government last November to buy the docks from the Doyle Shipping Group for a regeneration scheme that would see the docks become a modern waterfront settlement overlooking the harbour.

However, Brexit has led to the decision to take the site off the market, because it does not know what Ireland's future shipping needs will be.

Local Councillor Michael Frick Murphy said there is a lot of disappointment in the area and people feel the potential of Passage West is being thrown to the wayside.

For comments made by the councillor and more, click here.

Published in Waterfront Property

#WaterfrontProperty - Victoria Dockyard an eight-acre site in Passage West which is up for sale needs to be purchased by the State or Cork County Council in order for a development that benefits the town centre to be built there, TDs have warned.

As the Evening Echo reports, the site was once home to the Royal Victoria Dockyard where ships were built for over 100 years and where over 1,000 people were employed during WW1. It contains several hundred metres of road frontage, three access points and six terraced houses encompassed in a stone wall boundary.

Previous owners Howard Holdings had planned to build a hotel on the site after a €25m purchase in the early 2000s but then sold it to the Doyle Shipping Group (DSG) for €2.75m. It has recently been utilised as a steel scrapyard and is being offered on the open market for around €3.5m.

The current occupier would have to move out once the sale is completed and the buyer would be free to use it as they see fit within planning regulations. The site has been on the open market since September of last year.

It is unlikely its current use will continue once it is sold. To read more on the story click here.

The private quay at Passage West is where last month Afloat.ie featured an Irish owned cargoship involved (not in scrap-trading) but the loading of wood-chip bound for Scotland.  

Published in Waterfront Property

#ScenicPort - Scenic Kinsale with its marina and fishing fleet based in the west Cork harbour is widely renowned for its culinary status, however what is probably less known is its commercial shipping activity, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Around 100 cargoships annually call to Port of Kinsale along with occasional transatlantic superyachts and the odd small cruiseship. Commercial ships take the relative anchorage of the outer harbour downriver from the port on the Bandon estuary that is almost landlocked. Chief imports are bulk animal-foods and exports are timber.

In recent days Afloat monitored one of the larger ships to call that been newbuild Arklow Cape launched in October. The 5,085dwt cargoship having been introduced in November was not on a maiden voyage though it was the newbuild's first port of call to the harbour. Since last night the new ship had departed bound for Foynes. 

Initially on arrival to Kinsale the 87m Arklow Cape, the second of 10 'C' class sisters on order from ASL had anchored in the outer harbour. This is located closer to the famous Old Head of Kinsale. On board was a cargo of malted barley that had been loaded in Poole, Dorset. The seven crew of the Irish flagged Dutch built ship had sailed from the UK port to Kinsale’s single commercial pier.

Three years ago the pier named Custom Quay was given a €1.1m upgrade by the port’s authority, Cork County Council. The investment in port infrastructure saw an improvement to the 60m pier which was extended by 25m.

On completion of the works, the first ship to use the upgraded 85m pier took place in March 2015 with the berthing of Swami, incidentally a former ASL fleetmate named Arklow Swan. The ship’s agent Bandon Co-op who are the licensed stevedores for the Port of Kinsale, were instrumental in facilitating this inaugural call using the newly extended quay. Swami had discharged 3,800 tonnes of fertiliser.

Other cargoes traded through the south Munster port where handling facilities cater for coal, cement, fertiliser and grain.

The lengthened Custom Quay is a considerable improvement compared to the original pier in which a visit was made to during the last decade.

On that occasion when covering the Port of Kinsale for Inshore-Ireland (August 2005) and Ships Monthly (November 2005) another cargoship, Conformity by coincidence had too made a maiden port of call to the harbour. She arrived from Boston, Lincolnshire with a cargo of wheat feed.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#CORK FERRY RELAUNCH - According to today's Cork Independent, the Cork-Swansea ferry route which closed last Autumn has been followed-up by a new group to assess the feasibility of reopening the Celtic Sea service.

Those involved in the new group are from Cork County Council, the Port of Cork, Fáilte Ireland and representatives from the Irish Exporters Association which was announced by Mayor Tim Lombard, who believes that the wind up of Fastnet Line earlier this year and departure of ferry, has really hurt businesses in West Cork.

"There is a lack of tourism and a lack of business in West Cork this summer. There has been a major effect seen in the businesses in West Cork following the closure of the Fastnet Line," Cllr Lombard said. "It's why we are trying to push the boat out, if you pardon the pun," He added that the loss is also felt by the manufacturing sector which has lost a vital alternative freight link to the UK.

To read more about this story click HERE.

Published in Ferry

#FERRY NEWS - Approximately €500,000 is to be sought from three local authorities in the south-west region so to help restart the Cork-Swansea route which was served by the M.V. Julia (1982/22,161grt) until sailings ceased in November last year.

Representatives from Fastnet Line Ship Holdings Ltd are expected to attend a special meeting of Cork County Council next Monday at which they will outline a business plan for the company, which is in examinership.

They will also address a scheduled meeting of Cork City Council later the same day and are expected to communicate their request to Kerry County Council shortly.

For more about this story in today's Examiner click HERE

Published in Ferry
#PORT & SHIPPING NEWS - The Port of Cork is scaling-down its plans for a new container terminal in Ringaskiddy, according to the Irish Examiner.
The new plan is "significantly scaled back" from the €220 million containter terminal proposal for Oysterbank, which was rejected at appeals stage two years ago.
Port officials hope to submit the new application under the Strategic Infrastructure Act, which means the decision will be made by An Bord Pleanála and not Cork County Council.
Officials are already in consultation with the planning board and interest groups around Cork Harbour to eliminate any issues before proceeding with the new scheme, which will be half the size of the previous plan and will involve less land reclamation.
Expected upgrades to the roads infrastructure in the area will also have an impact on the new proposals.
The €100 million plan would be constructed over four phases, to be fully operational by 2020.
The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

#PORT & SHIPPING NEWS - The Port of Cork is scaling down its plans for a new container terminal in Ringaskiddy, according to the Irish Examiner.

The new plan is "significantly scaled back" from the €220 million containter terminal proposal for Oysterbank, which was rejected at appeals stage two years ago.

Port officials hope to submit the new application under the Strategic Infrastructure Act, which means the decision will be made by An Bord Pleanála and not Cork County Council.

Officials are already in consultation with the planning board and interest groups around Cork Harbour to eliminate any issues before proceeding with the new scheme, which will be half the size of the previous plan and will involve less land reclamation.

Expected upgrades to the roads infrastructure in the area will also have an impact on the new proposals.

The €100 million plan would be constructed over four phases, to be fully operational by 2020.

The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Port of Cork
Paris-based photographer Gilles Perrin is exhibiting 'People of the Sea' which is a documentary of photographs taken of the Irish Fishing industry, which is currently running in Dublin's Alliance Française Cultural Centre on Kildare Street until 26th November, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The exhibition format is of large black and white images often presented as diptychs and triptychs capture the lives of people working in maritime industries around the Cork coastline.

Gilles Perrin selected his subjects by visiting harbours and piers in locations such as Cobh, Baltimore, Castletownbere and Schull. The work was conducted through the Artist in residency programme at Sirius Arts Centre, Cobh and later by a similar residency position at the West Cork Arts Centre which took place over a few months in 2007 & 2008.

People of the Sea is organised in partnership with Veolia Environnement, also the name given for a new MOD70 class (Multi One Design). Veolia Environnement is one of only 12 such high-spec performance yachts which visited Dublin Bay in the summer calling to Dun Laoghaire and a transit of Dalkey Sound (PHOTO's). She was in Irish waters under the skipper Roland Jourdain and crew ahead of her first test, the Fastnet Race held in mid-August. To read more about Veolia Environnement click HERE and also www.canyousea.com/en/

The other participants of the exhibition which have lent their support are the Sirius Arts Centre, The Arts Council, Cork County Council and The West Cork Arts Centre, and iophotoworks. For more information about Perrin who has a master's Degree in photography visit www.art-contemporain.eu.org/perrin/

Published in Boating Fixtures
#FERRY – Following yesterdays High Court appointment of an interim examiner to the Fastnet Line Group, the ferry operator has issued two statements (click here) and an apology to passengers with the immediate closure of sailings, writes Jehan Ashmore.
As part of the examinership process, a re-structured business plan has been implemented with the Cork-Swansea service set to resume in the shoulder months starting on Easter's Good Friday, 6th April 2012 and throughout the high-season months, and ending the season on 29th September.

The discontinued winter sailing schedule for this year is also expected not to be repeated during October 2012-March 2013. Fastnet Line's decision to make the Celtic Sea route into a shoulder season and summer only service follows a similar path taken by Stena Line which withdrew Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead (HSS) sailings in mid-September, for report click here. The central corridor route is due to reopen sometime in April or May 2012.

Cork City and County council and Kerry County council have provided €700,000 to support Fastnet Line and yesterday they announced an additional €150,000 in co-funding for the period of the examinership. In order to stabilise finances the ferry company are to radically reduce passenger capacity of the Julia (see photo) from 1,500 down to 950. This is in line with the capacities of the Julia serving 'night' sailings.

She has a crew predominately from Eastern Europe and Irish and UK deck officers. The Bermuda flagged, Hamilton registered vessel is currently berthed at Ringaskiddy Ferry Terminal, Cork Harbour. At 154m she is the largest ferry to date capable of berthing in the limited confines of the swing basin in Swansea and with a draft of 5.8m in a port which is subject to a large tidal range on the Bristol Channel.

Operating costs on the 10 hour service has been severely hampered by continuing increases to world oil prices. From the year 2010 to this year, fuel costs rose by 27% and almost 50% from the original budget of 2009. The company claims that each crossing amounts to €18,560 alone in fuel costs.

Fastnet Line to date has carried 150,000 customers, of which 75% have originated from the UK market, generating on average €350 per person (€40m approx) exclusive of fare and on-board spend. This crucial market is core to the success of the company's direct 'gateway' route to scenic south-west Ireland, with Swansea connected to the M4 motorway linking midland population centres and London. The operator claims a saving of 600km driving based on a round trip compared to using rival ferries running on routes to Rosslare from Pembroke Dock and Fishguard.

Since the reinstatement of the service in March 2010, after Swansea Cork Ferries pulled the Superferry (photo) off-service in 2006, the loss to tourism generated revenue on both sides of the Celtic Sea was estimated to be £25m per annum according to the Welsh Assembly and a similar figure recorded in the Cork and Kerry region.

The company also outlines the reduction in carbon emissions saved from operating the only direct service specifically connecting the regions of Glamorgan and Munster. Some 500,000 freight miles alone were saved in the Welsh region since the service started instead of using alternative route running from Pembrokeshire ports.

Published in Ferry
Ballyvergan marsh is under threat after the discovery of an illegal pipe being used to drain the wetlands area, claims Coastwatch.
The Irish Times reports that the environmental group has called for immediate action over the draining of the marsh near Youghal in Co Cork.
Cork County Council has also confirmed to the paper that a letter regarding an "allegation of unathorised development" has been sent to the landowner.
The marsh at Ballyvergan is one of the largest on the south coast, and is zoned as a special amenity. It is also an important breeding site for migratory birds.
Karin Dubsky of Coastwatch said that the situation highlights the deficiencies in State policy regarding Ireland's wetlands.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Ballyvergan marsh is under threat after the discovery of an illegal pipe being used to drain the wetlands area, claims Coastwatch.

The Irish Times reports that the environmental group has called for immediate action over the draining of the marsh near Youghal in Co Cork. 

Cork County Council has also confirmed to the paper that a letter regarding an "allegation of unathorised development" has been sent to the landowner.

The marsh at Ballyvergan is one of the largest on the south coast, and is zoned as a special amenity. It is also an important breeding site for migratory birds.

Karin Dubsky of Coastwatch said that the situation highlights the deficiencies in State policy regarding Ireland's wetlands.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
Developing marinas on the Cork coastline is a top priority for county manager Martin Riordan.
Speaking to the Evening Echo recently, Riordan outlined plans to exploit tourism for job creation, focusing on Cork Harbour and the county's 680 miles of coastline.
"We need to develop a honey pot around Cork Harbour," he said. "An in terms of marinas, there is scope for another two or three marinas aroind the coast."
Riordan pinpointed Youghal and Schull as two preferred locations.
"I think Fáilte Ireland shoud be giving funding to get one or two of these marinas started," he added, noting that Cork County Council was prepared to provide council-owned land for the projects.
"If we could get another three marinas in the next four or fives years it would make a big difference to tourism," he said.
4NI reports that tenders have already been invited for a hotel and berthing area in Youghal.

Developing marinas on the Cork coastline is a top priority for county manager Martin Riordan.

Speaking to the Evening Echo recently, Riordan outlined plans to exploit tourism for job creation, focusing on Cork Harbour and the county's 680 miles of coastline.

"We need to develop a honey pot around Cork Harbour," he said. "An in terms of marinas, there is scope for another two or three marinas aroind the coast."

Riordan pinpointed Youghal and Schull as two preferred locations.

"I think Fáilte Ireland shoud be giving funding to get one or two of these marinas started," he added, noting that Cork County Council was prepared to provide council-owned land for the projects.

"If we could get another three marinas in the next four or fives years it would make a big difference to tourism," he said.

4NI reports that tenders have already been invited for a hotel and berthing area in Youghal.

Published in Cork Harbour
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The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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