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The 47th running of Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club’s Frostbite Series got underway yesterday in blue sky, sunny conditions and a brisk N-Westerly that reduced in strength as the afternoon wore on writes our special correspondent. Stalwart of the event, Olivier Prouveur, who announced at the conclusion of the 2016/17 Series that he would be taking a less prominent role in the managing of the event was in attendance, but in an observer role!

The Race Officer duty was undertaken by Frostbite RO debutant Cormac Bradley of the Fireball Class and for his first foray into the Frostbite Race Management the first decision was to decide if racing would take place. An early departure from DMYC with a suggestion that a postponement would be advised, if necessary, was vindicated when the assessment was that racing could proceed.

In a departure from previous formats, three starts were provided – Slow PY, (PY1), Lasers and Fast PY (PY2). And in a significant development, two windsurfers of the KONA Class joined in the racing.

Given the conditions and the “first day back” nature of the day, a single race was proposed and sailed with 5 laps of a trapezoid course used to wash away the cobwebs. Given that the keelboats, sailing their Turkey Shoot Series earlier in the morning, did not seem to be excessively hard pressed and taking into account the physical condition of the waters inside the harbour, the postponement wasn’t required and racing got underway on schedule, at 14:00.

shane mccarthySolo sailor Shane McCarthy (left), the Slow PY Class winner with DMYC's Neil Colin Photo: Frank Miller

As an experiment the two windsurfers were put in PY1, the argument being that if they were as fast as we thought they might be they would get away from the rest of the fleet and have less traffic to deal with on the race course. Their contemporaries on the first start were a Solo, an IDRA 14 and four Laser Vagos. One of the Konas led at the first weather mark, sitting about 60m inside the harbour mouth and closer to the end of the West Pier, but the Solo was not far behind. By the time they got to the end of the five laps, the windsurfer had a good lead on the Solo on the water, but was unable to save his time in handicap terms. In third place on the water was the IDRA of Pierre Long & John Parker. Marks 2 and 3 were in the vicinity of the approach to the marina and just east of the ferry terminal respectively and while spinnakers were a rarity on the top leg of the trapezoid, they were flown on the leg from 2 to 3. Again, only the asymmetrics had any real joy with spinnakers on the bottom leg of the course. Mark 4 was in the approximate location of the memorial on the East Pier.

The finishing order on the water was Kona, Solo, IDRA, but after handicap correction the win went to the Solo of Shane McCarthy with the windsurfer second and the IDRA third.
Ten Lasers answered the starter’s call, with three Radials in the bunch. And it was one of the Radials, helmed by Clare Gorman who set the pace for the first half of the course. Eventually she was reeled in by Gary O’Hare who went on to win on the water by 24 seconds, but after handicap correction, Gorman took the first Laser Frostbite Mug by a margin of 1:09. In third place was Richard Tate.

marie barry noel butlerFireballers Marie Barry and Noel Butler (right) the fast PY Class winners with DMYC's Neil Colin Photo: Frank Miller

 

Six Fast PYs populated the last start of the day, four Fireballs, a K1 and an RS400. Noel Butler with new crew, Marie Barry (15061) led the fleet from start to finish and won with a 1:24 margin. They weren’t seriously troubled at any stage of the race and even tired spinnaker on the top reach but the blustery nature of the wind coming over the wall suggested that discretion was the better part of valour. Behind them, the battle was for second and third and was populated by Frank Miller & Ed Butler (14713) and Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775). While the former pair had the better start and led during the early part of the race, they were undone by an incident with a Laser at one of the leeward mark roundings. The Laser went the wrong side of the mark and got his mainsheet snagged on the mark. This cause him to go into a slow painful capsize with his mast and main snagging the trapeze wire of crew Ed Butler who subsequently went swimming. However, Miller & Butler recovered to take second place back from Colin & Casey. They cut it very fine though, only six seconds separating the two boats. The Fireballs, Butler & Barry, Miller & Butler, Colin & Casey and son and father combination, David & Michael Keegan (14676), were the first four boats home and on handicap. Tom Murphy (K1) only just beat the RS400, helmed by Stuart Harris, on the water, but beat them more comfortably on corrected time.

During the hour’s racing the wind eased as forecast and the blue sky conditions made for a good day out. Frostbites 2017/18 is up and running.

DMYC’s Frostbites 2017/18 – Day 1.
PY1 – Slow Handicap
1 Solo Shane McCarthy Coal Harbour 5302
2 Kona TBA 1969
3 IDRA Pierre Long & John Parker DMYC 161
4 Kona Des Gibney 2677
Lasers
1 Radial Claire Gorman NYC 207800
2 Full Gary O’Hare RStGYC 201364
3 Full Richard Tate 186300
4 Full Gavan Murphy 173062
PY2 – Fast Handicap
1 Fireball Noel Butler & Marie Barry NYC 15061
2 Fireball Frank Miller & Ed Butler DMYC 14713
3 Fireball Neil Colin & Margaret casey DMYC 14775
4 Fireball David & Michael Keegan RStGYC 14676
5 K1 Tom Murphy NYC 59

For a first day of the series, the entries were down on previous years, this was assumed to be a combination of the forecast, the preceding week’s mid-term break for schools and the usual need to get momentum developed. The organisers would welcome more entries in the forthcoming Sundays.

Published in Dublin Bay

Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club (DMYC) starts its 47th Season of dinghy frostbite racing in Dun Laoghaire Harbour this Sunday with a warning signal at 01.57 hrs.

The series is open to monohull centre board dinghies and attracts entries from clubs in the greater Leinster area.

The Winter 2016 series saw 19 races over the period November to the end of March. Organiser Neil Colin of the DMYC says the popular series 'offers great value for money, and with the discard system in the results, eases the pressure to turn up every week'.

In response to the changing dynamic of the entrants, with exception of the Lasers, the balance of the fleet will race in two PY fleets with the cut off set at 1068 between fleet 1 & 2, as further detailed in the Sailing Instructions.

Daily “Mug” prizes will be presented after racing in the DMYC, with soup and refreshments available along with the post race chatter.

The DMYC have limited dinghy parking for visiting entries on a “first come” basis. Full details are available here. Download the poster below.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

‘The Final Fling is Flung’ commented one competitor as he painfully dragged his boat up the slipway in Dun Laoghaire. Strong north-easterly’s greeted the fleet on Sunday afternoon.

With a healthy entry of 22 boats, from four different dinghy fleets – the effects of the 'weather bom'b that was Storm Brian caused the postponement of racing by 24 hours. Three races with no discard were held in the Harbour.

In the Feva fleet – Elysia O’Leary and Lilly Dwyer took top spot in the testing conditions.

Laser Standard – Conor O’Leary sailed solidly to take first overall – with the rest of the fleet decimated by gear and body failure!

Toby hudson fowlerRoyal St. George's Toby Hudson Fowler, sporting the overall Final Fling prize!
Laser Radial first overall was decided on the last mark rounding of the last race with young gun Toby Hudson-Fowler getting the better of Dinghy Master Sean ‘Recently Radialised’ Craig. First Female was Shirley Gilmore.

Lsser sailing dun laoghaire

The Waspz fleet wisely stayed at home!

Final Fling 2017 showcased the competitive Dinghy racing is provided by DBSC each Tuesday evening during the summer – Overall regatta winner Toby commented that he will ‘definitely joining in next year and will be dragging along some of his young radial sailor mates’…

If any other Dinghy fleets want to get involved or make Tuesday evening dinghy racing part of their training plans for 2018 please let us know now!

Thanks to RO Michael Tyrell & Crew, DBSC for providing committee and patrol boats and host club Royal St George.

Final Fling 2018 – 29/9/18 – one for the diary!

Results here

Published in RStGYC

Dublin City is extremely vulnerable to coastal flooding which could cost at least €340 million in insurance claims alone, according to a new book, Dublin Bay – Nature and History (The Collins Press, price €24.99). Richard Nairn, one of three authors of the book, said, ‘Rising sea levels, increasingly severe storms and poor flood defences will combine to cause frequent flooding of property in the coastal areas of Sandymount and Clontarf.’ He added that there needs to be a high level of cooperation between all state and local authorities to ensure that the capital city is protected from the worst effects of climate change. 

Eamonn O’Reilly, Chief Executive of Dublin Port Company, said, ‘The challenge to simultaneously manage, develop and conserve Dublin Bay is formidable and requires an appreciation of both the bay’s natural environment and its built environment.’

Weaving the kindred strands of history and nature, the authors tell the fascinating story of the bay. The development of the port city has been mirrored by major changes in the coastal environment. Geographer and planner Rob Goodbody, said, ‘The human and natural components of the bay have learned to coexist and, in some cases, even to depend on each other. We wanted to show people things like how the creation of Dublin Port caused the formation of Bull Island, or how the cockles and mussels immortalised in “Molly Malone” caused typhoid fever throughout the city.’ Co-author David Jeffrey, added, ‘The bay has stretched its arms widely to embrace countless generations of Dubliners: it is a life support system, an economic asset and an invaluable recreational resource.’ This new look at a familiar seascape authoritatively explains its importance to the past, present and future of our city and country.

Richard Nairn is a writer and ecologist from Dublin. He studied Natural Sciences at Trinity College Dublin and was the first Director of BirdWatch Ireland. He provides ecological advice to local authorities, and supported the UNESCO Biosphere designation of Dublin Bay. An active sailor, he has also walked all the shores of the bay.

David Jeffrey, Emeritus Professor of Biology at Trinity College Dublin, lives in Howth. He was a key researcher on the Dublin Bay Water Quality Management Plan and is a tireless advocate for science-based nature conservation.

Rob Goodbody from Dublin is a geographer and planner. He has written several local histories and regularly leads historic walking tours in Dublin.

Did you know that the River Liffey was much wider and shallower in earlier millennia, before it was confined between the quay walls. At low tide, the mud would have been too soft to support a person’s weight and the only crossing was a wide shallow section of the river, with wicker mats staked to the riverbed, which came to be known by the Irish name of Átha Cliath, or ‘ford of the hurdles’. The name Dubhlinn means ‘black pool’, referring to deeper water where the River Poddle enters the Liffey estuary. Thus, the names of the city itself related to the bay.

Dublin Port, which occupies the mouth of the Liffey, is the gateway for three quarters of the trade entering and leaving Ireland. Six ferry companies operate up to seventeen sailings a day to the UK and over a hundred cruise ships visit each year.

Dublin Bay had the first designated bird sanctuary in Ireland and it now has more designations than any other place in the country. The latest of these is its recognition by UNESCO as a biosphere.

The initiative of Dublin City Council in 2015 to extend the UNESCO designation of Biosphere to the entire area of Dublin Bay and its hinterland was innovative, forward-thinking and a model for good international practice in coastal zone management. The Biosphere is managed through a partnership between three coastal local authorities, Dublin Port Company, Fáilte Ireland and the National Parks and Wildlife Service. This promising start should be the first building block in a development that could cast Ireland as a world leader. In ecological terms, the biosphere is the global ecological system integrating all living beings and their relationships, including their interaction with the physical environment.

Launched in 1971, the Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB) is an Intergovernmental Scientific Programme that aims to establish a scientific basis for the improvement of relationships between people and their environments. Still in place over four decades later, MAB combines the natural and social sciences, economics and education to improve human livelihoods and the equitable sharing of benefits, and to safeguard natural and managed ecosystems, thus promoting innovative approaches to economic development that are socially and culturally appropriate, and environmentally sustainable.

Price €24.99 / £21.99 • Hardback • 312 pages and available to buy online from Afloat's Marketplace here

  • The book will be Launched on Thursday, 2 November in Dublin Port Company. The guest speaker will be Senator David Norris. More launch details here.
Published in Book Review
Tagged under

The Irish Fireball regatta season came to an end with a four-race Munster Championships in Dun Laoghaire yesterday (Saturday 14th). The irony of course is that Dun Laoghaire isn’t in Munster at all, of course, but the Association is cutting its cloth according to its numbers and an offer from the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club to host the event was readily accepted. With an expectation of low numbers, the regatta organisation structure was minimised to two ribs and 3 people and the course configuration was reduced to a windward-leeward option.

Race Officer, Cormac Bradley, ably assisted by Alistair Court and Charles Dunn, was tasked with getting four races in and watching the weather forecast during the week before, the challenge would be to get them in before the weather closed in. While XCWeather was suggesting that the base wind strength would be of the order of 12 – 15 knots, the gusts were projected to start off at 20 knots and grow to 27 knots as the day wore on. At the briefing the six-boat fleet were made aware of the forecast , the impending gustiness of the day and the programme to get 4 races in and to get off the water before the weather got “hooligan”…………and this was not due to the impending blast of Ophelia!

The saving grace on the day was that the wind direction was SSW meaning that the sailing area was in flat water. The sailing area was to the west of Dun Laoghaire harbour and with the slimmed down organisation the start, finish and gate of the windward-leeward course were coincident. This meant that the windward mark could be moved relative to the other two fixed points of the course.

Contrary to the weather forecast, only the first race was a blustery affair that generated a few capsizes, but none of the capsizes I witnessed were due to wind strength, so maybe only one was due to wind strength and that happened before the start. As the day wore on the wind eased, the sun came out and “full-on trapezing” upwind gave way to sitting on the windward deck. Race lengths were of the order of 30 – 40 minutes and 3 or 4 laps, with race times and laps increasing as it became apparent that the projected wind conditions were not going to materialise.

Proceedings on the water were dominated by the usual suspects – Messrs Butler and Oram (15061, NYC) – but they didn’t have everything their own way. Class Chairman Neil Cramer, crewing for Niall McGrotty (14938, Skerries Sailing Club) led Race 2 until the last leeward mark before they were passed before the last weather mark. Indeed, at one stage they had dropped back to third on the water, with Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775, DMYC) getting into second. However, the ultimate measure of success is the sequence across the finish line and in this regard Butler and Oram reigned supreme with four wins.

The competition for second and third was a tighter affair between McGrotty/Cramer and Colin/Casey and went the way of the former combination by way of a more favourable ratio of second places on the water, 3:1. It might even have been a bigger margin if the Skerries combination hadn’t capsized in Race 3 when they were in a strong second place – they finished sixth.

For the balance of the fleet – Frank Miller & Peter Doherty (14713, DMYC), Mick Creighton & Marie Barry (14854, NYC) and Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe (14691, RStGYC), the “pink ladies”, it was a case of sharing the lesser places and two of the three had race capsizes that cost each of them.

2017 Fireball Munsters, Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club

October 14th

R1

R2

R3

R4

Gross

Nett

1

Noel Butler & Stephen Oram

15061

National Yacht Club

1

1

1

1

4

3

2

Niall McGrotty & Neil Cramer

14938

Skerries Sailing Club

2

2

6

2

12

6

3

Neil Colin & Margaret Casey

14775

Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club

3

3

2

3

11

8

4

Frank Miller & Peter Doherty

14713

Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club

8

4

3

4

19

11

5

Mick Creighton & Marie Barry

14854

National Yacht Club

4

6

5

5

20

14

6

Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe

14691

Royal St. George Yacht Club

8

5

4

6

23

15

 

For 15061 this completes a season “Grand Slam” of all the Provincial titles, the Nationals and the Dublin Bay Sailing Club Series. While Stephen was absent for the Nationals, Noel helmed the boats to each of these titles.

After the racing, prize-giving and post-mortems the Class held its AGM in the DMYC clubhouse.

In his Chairman’s address Neil Cramer highlighted the fact that although Noel & Stephen had dominated the top spot on the podium there had been a wide spread of combinations filling the lowers steps of the podium.  His report also reflected the various formats the regattas of the season had taken – a three-day, nine race Nationals at Lough Derg with SODs, Mirrors and Squibs as part of their Harvest Regatta, a two-day six race Leinsters co-sailed with the Skerries Club Regatta, a one-day four race Open at Greystones, a two-day six race Ulsters in Ballyholme with the 420s and today’s one-day four race Munsters. The Mirrors in particular have expressed an interest in teaming up again with a view to getting their members a taste of Fireballing and a provisional arrangement to do that in Mullingar is on the agenda.

The turnout for the DBSC Tuesday Series was less than last year but was still healthy and the competition ran for the entire season.  A number of the dinghy classes are anxious to get some weekend racing organised under the burgee of DBSC in 2018 and it appears the best way to achieve this objective is to nominate specific Saturdays on which this will happen. 

In terms of the committee structure, there was a resignation and a slight shuffling of the seats around the table – Neil Cramer remains as Class Chairman, Frank Miller takes on the Secretary portfolio and Marie Barry that of Treasurer. Other committee members are staying on. Neil thanked all those who had served in 2017 and thanked them for their continued support.  

An update on the affairs of Fireball International as discussed at the Europeans in Lyme Regis in August was tabled and the meeting was advised that we are in election mode. Current FI Commodore Steve Chesney is not seeking re-election and his successor is likely to be a lady Fireballer from Switzerland. Further discussions revolved around a motion by the UK Association that the class be able to use twin spinnaker poles and it prompted a lively discussion in the DMYC as well.

Given the numbers we have had on the water this season, the meeting closed out with a soul-searching discussion on how we get our numbers back to a respectable level. Some of the issues to be discussed were;

  •        The need to get younger people interested in the class.
  •        Diluting the perception that the Fireball can only be competitive if it is brand new.
  •        Undoing the perception that it is an overly expensive class to get in to.
  •        Marketing the flexibility of the crew combinations that can sail the boat competitively.
  •        Sharing venues with other classes to showcase the class
  •        Putting energy and training into club fleets that aren’t travelling to get them onto their own water.

The meeting was particularly encouraged that a couple had come up from Killaloe for the meeting and were able to report that two Spanish guys had joined their fleet and were keen to get a Fireball presence going again.

The day closed with a gathering of the fleet in the Purty Kitchen, a hostelry around the corner from the DMYC for dinner.

The Frostbite Series starts on the first Sunday of November and this year we will be part of the fast PY Fleet. The expectation is that we will have 6-7 boats contesting the event.

The Class Dinner takes place on November 25th in the National Yacht Club.

Published in Fireball
Tagged under

BENETEAU 31.7 - 1. Fiddly Bits (Timmins/Quigley/Murray/Breen), 2. Crazy Horse (F Heath & I Schuster), 3. Attitude (Milner Sugars Owens) 

BENETEAU 31.7 - 1. Prospect (Chris Johnston), 2. Crazy Horse (F Heath & I Schuster), 3. Levante (M.Leahy/J.Power)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. Lively Lady (Derek Martin), 2. Wow (George Sisk)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. Wow (George Sisk), 2. Lively Lady (Derek Martin)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Indecision (Declan Hayes et al), 2. Prima Luce (O'Flynn, Burke, Lemass), 3. Jalapeno (P Barrington et al)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. White Mischief (Tim Goodbody), 2. Something Else (J.Hall et al), 3. Jalapeno (P Barrington et al)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. ECLIPSE (D BELL), 2. Windjammer (L Casey & D Power), 3. GWILI TWO (D CLARKE & P MAGUIRE)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. Peridot (Jim McCann et al), 2. Windjammer (L Casey & D Power), 3. SPRINGER (I BOWRING)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Cartoon (McCormack/Brady/Lawless), 2. Dubious (P Richardson), 3. Asterix (Boushel/Meredith/Counihan)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Pamafe (M Costello), 2. Dubious (P Richardson), 3. Cartoon (McCormack/Brady/Lawless)

FLYING FIFTEEN - 1. FFantastic Mr Fox (N Meagher & N Matthews), 2. Elena (Ross Doyle), 3. Ignis Caput (David Mulvin)

FLYING FIFTEEN - 1. Ignis Caput (David Mulvin), 2. Frequent Flyer (C Doorley), 3. As Good As It Gets (Ben Mulligan 

GLEN - 1. Pterodactyl (R & D McCaffrey), 2. Glendun (B.Denham et al), 3. Glenariff (Adrian Lee)

IDRA 14 FOOT - 1. Diane (B Murphy), 2. Doody (J.Fitzgerald/J.Byrne), 3. Dart (Pierre Long)

IDRA 14 FOOT - 1. Diane (B Murphy), 2. Dart (Pierre Long), 3. Sapphire (Lorcan O'Sullivan)

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Alias (D.Meeke/M.McCarthy), 2. Ruff Nuff (D & C Mitchell), 3. Bandit (Kirwan/Cullen/Brown)

SHIPMAN - 1. Barrosa (Geraghty/Trotter), 2. Jo Slim (J.Clarke et al), 3. Invader (Gerard Glynn)

SHIPMAN - 1. Barrosa (Geraghty/Trotter), 2. Jo Slim (J.Clarke et al), 3. Invader (Gerard Glynn)

SQUIB - 1. Periguin (N Colcough), 2. Tais (Michael O'Connell), 3. Little Demon (Sheila Power)

SQUIB - 1. Tears in Heaven (M Halpenny & G Ferguson), 2. Little Demon (Sheila Power), 3. Periguin (N Colcough)

Sportsboat - 1. Jambiya (M Ryan & V Lattimore), 2. Jawesome III (M Dyke & B Darcy), 3. JOYRIDE (P BOURKE)

Sportsboat - 1. Jambiya (M Ryan & V Lattimore), 2. Jawesome III (M Dyke & B Darcy), 3. JOYRIDE (P BOURKE) 

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS - 1. The Great Escape (P Rigney), 2. Lucyo (P Aonghus OhEocha), 3. Sweet Martini (B Carswell)

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS - 1. Persistence (C Broadhead et al), 2. Act Two (M O'Leary), 3. Cevantes (P Conway)

Published in DBSC
Tagged under

#MarineWildlife - This weekend Dublin Port is deploying data buoys in Dublin Bay to monitor marine wildlife activity during the controversial dredging works at Alexandra Basin.

According to The Irish Times, the four boys will provide live data on any whales, dolphins or porpoises in the vicinity of the Burford Bank near Howth, where up to a million tonnes of dredge spoil will be dumped over the next few weeks.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, campaigners have raised concerns about the safety of Dublin Bay’s harbour porpoises, protected by an SAC since 2013, during the dredging operation.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

Jean Mitton's Levana of the Royal St. George Yacht Club has won the cut-short Beneteau 31.7 National Championships at the Royal Irish Yacht Club. See full results below.

Mitton held the overnight lead after four races in the 13–boat fleet with a second and three firsts from Chris Johnston's National Yacht Club entry Prospect who counted a first and three seconds.

Third place went to class Captain Frank Heath on Crazy Horse of the Royal St. George.

Today's racing was cancelled due to strong southerly winds on Dublin Bay.

Beneteau 31.7 Prospect 2319Chris Johnston's Prospect from the National Yacht Club entry was second overall. Photo: Afloat.ie

Beneteau 31.7 avalon DBSC 2110Roger Conlans and James Fox's Beneteau 31.7 Avalon from Dun Laoghaire Marina Photo: Afloat.ie

Beneteau 31.7 2056Michael and Bernie Bryson's Bluefin Two from the National Yacht Club on starboard tack passes Michael Blaney's Royal St. George entry After You. Photo: Afloat.ieBeneteau 31.7 2056Beneteau 31.7 2056Jean Mitton's Levana keeps Chris Johnston's Prospect in close cover Photo: Afloat.ie

Beneteau 31.7 after you DBSC 2310Beneteau 31.7 after you DBSC 2310Beneteau 31.7 after you DBSC 2310Beneteau 31.7 after you DBSC 2310Beneteau 31.7 after you DBSC 2310

Beneteau 31.7 National Championships 2017 Entries: 13 Races Sailed: 4

Series Place Sail No Boat Helm Club Series Points Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4
1 IRL1740 Levana Jean Mitton RSGYC 5 2 1 1 1
2 IRL1565 Prospect Chris Johnston NYC/RIYC 7 1 2 2 2
3 IRL2004 Crazy Horse Frank Heath & Ivan Schuster RIYC/RSGYC 16 3 5 5 3
4 IRL6662 Bluefin 2 Michael & Bernie Bryson NYC 19 7 4 3 5
5 IRL1310 After You Too Michael Blaney RStGYC 25 4 3 4 DNF14
6 IRL7317 Attitude Trina Milner RIYC 28 8 7 9 4
7 IRL8063 Indigo Joe McDonald NYC 28 6 10 6 6
8 IRL6909 Extreme Reality Lorcan Balfe NYC 31 10 6 8 7
9 IRL2970 Kernach Eoin O'Driscoll NYC 36 12 9 7 8
10 IRL3171 Kalamar Dave Russell NYC 44 13 12 10 9
11 IRL1041 Avalon Roger Conan RStGYC 45 9 8 DNF14 DNC14
12 IRL2474 Camira Peter Beamish RIYC 47 5 DNF14 DNC14 DNC14
13 IRL5317 Fiddly Bits Bill Quigley & Others NYC 47 11 11 11 DNF14
Published in Racing
Tagged under

The new offshore racing entity, 'Ireland Ocean Racing', that will put Royal Cork Yacht Club's Nicholas O'Leary (31) at the helm of the IMOCA 60 Hugo Boss on the 2020 Vendée Globe start line is sailing off Cork Harbour.

As Afloat.ie reported previously, the demo sails are part of the launch of the world–girdling project that will arrive into Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Wednesday or Thursday. O’Leary, son of Royal Cork's Anthony and Sally O'Leary, wants to be the first Irish sailor to complete the non–stop round the world challenge. He'll be following in the wake of plucky Enda O'Coineen's ill–fated Kilcullen that was dismasted in the last race off New Zealand in December.

Hugo Boss 3852(Above and below) The Ireland Ocean Racing Team onboard Hugo Boss. Photos: Bob Bateman

Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1Hugo boss OLeary cork harbour1

O'Leary's team say he is expected into Dublin Bay on August 30. 

Read more in WM Nixon's blog: How Much in the Sponsorship Pot for all These Irish Offshore Sailing Superstar Hopefuls?

Published in Vendee Globe

B21S - 1. VENTUNO (R FOGARTY), 2. SMALL WONDER (H KELLY & J MCSTAY), 3. YIKES (P CARROLL)

B21S - 1. VENTUNO (R FOGARTY), 2. MARISSA XIV (FRANK ELMES), 3. YIKES (P CARROLL)

BENETEAU 31.7 - 1. After You Too (M Blaney), 2. Levana (Jean Mitton), 3. Crazy Horse (F Heath & I Schuster)

BENETEAU 31.7 - 1. Fiddly Bits (Timmins/Quigley/Murray/Breen), 2. Avalon (R.Conan/J.Fox), 3. Extreme Reality (L Balfe)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. Wow (George Sisk), 2. Lively Lady (Derek Martin)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. Wow (George Sisk), 2. Lively Lady (Derek Martin)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Indecision (Declan Hayes et al), 2. Something Else (J.Hall et al), 3. Jigamaree (R Harris)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Something Else (J.Hall et al), 2. Juggerknot (A Algeo et al), 3. Bon Exemple (C Byrne)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. RUPERT (R & P LOVEGROVE), 2. GWILI TWO (D CLARKE & P MAGUIRE), 3. Red Rhum (J Nicholson)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. RUPERT (R & P LOVEGROVE), 2. Windjammer (L Casey & D Power), 3. GWILI TWO (D CLARKE & P MAGUIRE 

CRUISERS 3 A - 1. Enigma (J Monaghan), 2. Running Wild (B & S Foley), 3. Cartoon (McCormack & Lawless)

CRUISERS 3 A - 1. Running Wild (B & S Foley), 2. Cartoon (McCormack & Lawless), 3. Enigma (J Monaghan) 

CRUISERS 3 B - 1. Cacciatore (M Ni Cheallachain), 2. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 3. Gung Ho (G & S O'Shea) 

CRUISERS 3 B - 1. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 2. Cacciatore (M Ni Cheallachain), 3. Saki (Paget McCormack et al)

CRUISERS 5A - 1. Coumeenole (B Kavanagh), 2. Edenpark (Liam Farmer), 3. Persistence (C. Broadhead et al)

CRUISERS 5A - 1. Coumeenole (B Kavanagh), 2. Persistence (C. Broadhead et al), 3. White Lotus (Paul Tully)

CRUISERS 5B - 1. Fortitudine (D & A Clarke), 2. Calypso (Howard Knott), 3. Menapia (J Sweeney)

CRUISERS 5B - 1. Vertigo (M Muldoon), 2. The Great Escape (P Rigney), 3. Nirvana (B Neeson) 

DRAGON - 1. Zu (M Minch/C Grimley/T Pearson), 2. Phantom (D.Williams & P.Bowring), 3. DCision (J.Mason/G.Purcell/C.Fleming)

FLYING FIFTEEN - 1. Deranged (N Colin), 2. As Good As It Gets (Ben Mulligan), 3. fFinisterre (C O'Leary & A Court) 

GLEN - 1. Glendun (B.Denham et al), 2. Pterodactyl (R & D McCaffrey), 3. Glenroan (T O'Sullivan) 

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Shannagh (S.Gill/P.MacDiarmada), 2. RUFFLES (M CUTLIFFE), 3. Ruff Nuff (D & C Mitchell)

SB20 - 1. Sin Bin (Michael O'Connor), 2. Sacrebleu (R Hayes & C Galavan), 3. AlertPackaging.com (J Burke & D Burke)

SHIPMAN - 1. The Den (A. Costello/G.Millar), 2. Viking (Brian Glynn et al), 3. Bluefin (B.Finucane et al 

SHIPMAN - 1. Viking (Brian Glynn et al), 2. The Den (A. Costello/G.Millar), 3. Invader (Gerard Glynn) 

SQUIB - 1. Why Not (Derek & Jean Jago), 2. Sidewinder (R Westrup & R Bowen), 3. Fox (M Moran & M Shiel)

Sportsboat - 1. Jester (D Curtain), 2. Big Bad Wolfe (David Ryan), 3. GRADUATE (D O'KEEFE)

Published in DBSC
Page 4 of 88

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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