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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Port

East Wall Water Sports Club will launch two new clinker–built rowing boats next month. The hand–crafted punts were built with the support of Dublin Port Company and Dublin City Council. 

East Wall Water Sport’s was founded in 1981 provides a wide variety of water sports activities to the local community. The new rowing boats will add to their growing fleet of vessels, which promotes coastal rowing on Dublin’s north side, according to the club's Martin Whelan.

'With the help of many other volunteers from the East Wall skiff rowing club the project has finally coming to an end. It’s wonderful to see at first hand the boatbuilding skills which our Viking ancestors handed down to us, still in use today', said Whelan.

The project began in October 2015 and the two clinker built boats, are to be blessed and launched on Sat 1st Oct at 12 noon.

With the growing popularity of rowing within the club, the skiff rowing section saw the need for these new vessels. These boats will primarily be to teach younger children the skills of rowing.

The current project is just one of numerous projects completed by this partnership over recent years that keeps alive an age old tradition of wooden boat building.

To date the club has refurbished two 26 ft rowing skiffs and built currachs and naomhogs in their workshop. Dublin Port Company provided free of charge the services of their resident shipwright Patsy Whelan and his apprentice Stephen, on a weekly basis to supervise the project.

East Wall Water Sports Club through their skiff rowing section and currach section now provide great rowing experiences for all ages at a very minimal cost. The club is open to all, young and old, and a friendly atmosphere is always maintained.

 

Published in Coastal Rowing

The Cruising Association of Ireland’s annual rally in Dublin’s River Liffey over the weekend brought a whiff of the open sea and a fleet of 32 boats into the heart of the busy city past the visiting “ten storey” cruise liner Nautica writes W M Nixon. And as one of the themes of the rally is the fleet’s negotiation of all the opening bridges upriver as far as the Customs House before returning eastward again in formation to berth at Dublin Port’s long pontoon immediately west of the Eastlink Bridge, inevitably there was interruption to shoreside traffic.

Cruise Liner Nautica in DublinThe Cruise Liner Nautica in Dublin at the weekend will probably have voyaged round the world, as her home port of Majuro is in the Marshall Islands in mid-Pacific. And the CAI’s Pat Murphy’s Aldebaran (extreme right) has certainly sailed round the world. Photo: W M Nixon

Cruising fleet eastlink  bridgeIt’s a Boat Show afloat…..the CAI fleet waiting for the eastlink to open. Photo: W M Nixon
It’s astonishing how quickly the long vehicle queues can build up, and reactions to this brief stopping of the city’s bustling traffic were predictable. Tourists and locals just out for the day and ambling along the quays were delighted by it all. It isn’t until it happens that you realise just how rare are boat displays in the river with which people can identify, for they see themselves in the crews on the many boats which as ever – boats and people alike – were remarkable in their variety.

Nauticat 33 ketch own-built steel 40-foot Swallow How’s this for two very different styles in cruising boats? Dave Hopkin’s recently-acquired Nauticat 33 ketch is in the foreground, while Wally McGuirk’s own-built steel 40-footer Swallow – O’Brien Kennedy’s last design – is beyond in close formation as they transit the Eastlink. Photo: W M Nixon

sailing yachts on river liffey“A bonny fleet comes into town” Photo: W M Nixon
But people on errands in cars or vans tended towards irritation until they saw the span on the Eastlink rising sky-wards, or the always fascinating Calatrava-designed Samuel Beckett bridge rotating to let the vessels through. Maybe it was wishful thinking on my part, but I though that the realisation of the co-ordinated project which was taking place had a soothing effect even on courier van drivers, while being a timely reminder that Dublin is Ireland’s largest port.

And as far as the welfare of our city port is concerned, even in the short year since the CAI was last in the river, the tower cranes have proliferated. Whatever about the future, there’s a building boom at present along the Liffey, and a sense of optimism.

cruis ass6The figurehead on the Jeanie Johnston provides an evocative frame for the boats of the CAI. Photo: W M Nixon

Samuel Beckett bridge opens for yachtsAny excuse to get the fascinating Samuel Beckett bridge to swing open is welcome, and a visit by the CAI is a better reason than most. Photo: W M Nixon

Of course, for the main event on Saturday, the weather was benign. We’ll blot out Sunday’s rain, and instead simply recall that on Saturday CAI Commodore Clifford Brown presided over a full house of boats and people in sunshine, with the usual conviviality at the capacity crowd for the dinner on the restaurant ship Cill Airne.

This included a reception for the people working in Dublin Port and with the City Council who facilitated the co-ordinated opening of the bridges. So there was enthusiastic support when world circumnavigation veteran Pat Murphy of Aldebaran suggested that in future it simply be called The Three Bridges Rally. In fact, they should copyright the name immediately, for it’s a great way to bring the cruising season gently towards its close.

Dublin Port’s pontoon pleasure craftEven with the full length of Dublin Port’s pontoon in use, fleet numbers were such that there still had to be some rafting up. Photo: W M Nixon

Published in Cruising
Tagged under

#DublinPort - Planning permission has been granted for a major dredging scheme at Dublin Port, clearing the final hurdle before works on the proposed new cruise liner terminal for the city.

The application, given the go-ahead by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Tuesday 13 September, provides for dredging from the North Wall Quay Extension to the -10m Chart Datum contour in Dublin Bay.

It also permits the disposal of dredged material at the existing licensed site west of the Burford Bank – a matter of much controversy this summer due to its location within the special are of conservation from Rockabill to Dalkey Island.

The subsequent Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project comprises the infilling of the basin at current berths 52 and 53, a deepening of the fairway and a marina protection structure, intended to future-proof the port to accommodate the next generation of cruise liners of more than 300m in length.

Dublin Port's plans advance as Dun Laoghaire awaits the next step in its own harbour masterplan proposals for a modern cruise terminal.

Published in Dublin Port

This week on my podcast, I focus on what Dublin is doing about its waterfront. This follows on my last podcast about the lack of attention by many of the country’s towns and cities to their waterfronts and why they should be doing more to make those waterfronts attractive to the public, so that they would become part of local environmental infrastructure, making the ports accessible as far as possible, allowing for security and safety constraints, so that there would be more public understanding and appreciation of the importance of the ports.

Dublin Port’s Chief Executive, Eamonn O’Reilly, has spoken to me about what Dublin is doing in this regard. He has just announced the competition for public art work displays in the port and he explains to me the Port Trail is being constructed, a public viewing facility of the port, its history and culture. This is a positive development and puts Dublin far ahead of any other port in the country. What is most important is the realisation which he expresses, that public appreciation and understanding of the port has diminished and that this link needs to be restored.

And he speaks about sailing within the port area.

• Listen to the podcast below.

• I will be interviewing Eamonn O’Reilly in more depth and detail in the next edition of my radio programme podcast – THIS ISLAND on Afloat.ie about the working of the port and its plans for future expansion.

Read all the latest Dublin Port news here

Published in Island Nation

#WindsofChange – Afloat.ie has monitored Mein Schiff 5 movements noting the new cruiseship less than two months in service was forced to change its first ever call to an Irish port today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

It transpired that high winds forecast at Dublin Port were the cause and so the 2,750 passenger cruiseship had to call to Cobh, where the 295m newbuild berthed this morning but was due to call anyway tomorrow. Cruisegoers will not be left dissappointed as the near 100,00 gross tonnage ship will be simply swapping ports with the scheduled call to the capital a day later. 

The impact of windage on the TUI Cruises newest ship with 15 decks high had to be considered when berthing in the confines of Dublin Port, where most callers are to Alexandra Basin.

Dublin Port Company’s first ever cruise terminal costing €30m is part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project (ABR) which is been built to accommodate even larger cruiseships and following a major dredging channel campaign.

A reconfiguration of quays will enable these mega cruiseships to call using an increased turning circle though at the expense of demolishing the end of the North Wall Quay Extension.

More quayside space and adjacent hard standing for cargo space, however will be made with the infilling of the Dublin Graving Docks that closed in April.

The ABR project is phase one of DPC plans to also permit increasingly larger cargsoships and associated deeper drafts to enter the port, so to meet demands of throughput which is forecast to rise, as the port in 2015 alone experienced record breaking volumes.

The 220m graving dock is nearby to where these mega cruiseships will dock at the two-berth terminal and much closer to city-centre, been next to the Tom Clarke toll-bridge.

Published in Cruise Liners

#NewestShip – Afloat.ie has tracked another big brand new cruiseship, Mein Schiff 5 that is to make a first call to an Irish port tomorrow, reflecting the growing demand for such visits and related infrastructural developments, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Mein Schiff 5 towering 15 decks and almost 100,000 gross tonnage is TUI Cruises' latest fleet member with a 2,750 passenger capacity that is to make a debut to Dublin Port before dawn.

After her visit to the capital, passengers have no less than 13 restuarants and bistros dining options to choose, before it will be the Port of Cork’s turn to welcome the latest newcomer to Cobh on Saturday. Both Dublin through its new cruise terminal development and Cobh’s upgrade are to meet the berthing requirements of even much larger cruiseships.

Today, Mein Schiff is berthed at the Port of Holyhead from where had arrived from the UK’s premier cruise port of Southampton.

In July, the 295m vessel was named Mein Schiff 5 at a ceremony in Lübeck/Travemünde. It was at nearby Kiel, she sailed across the Baltic Sea for her maiden voyage to Stockholm, calling at Tallinn, St. Petersburg and Helsinki.

The newest addition brings to a total of 14 cruiseships for TUI Group, a hotel and cruise group that was initiated at the end of 2014 and includes the rebranding of the UK operator, Thomson Cruises. Mein Schiff 5 is the Group’s third new build, and in June was handed over 10 days ahead of scheduled at the Meyer Turku shipyard, Finland to subsidiary TUI Cruises.

Like TUI Cruises’ other newbuilds, Meins Schiff 5 is a low-vibration vessel, which uses state of the art technologically that will enhance a pleasant environment for her guests. She has a 280m jogging track and 25m swimming pool.

In terms of operational efficiency, there is 30% less energy consumption and therefore 30% less fuel than other cruiseships of a comparable size.

Towards the end of the construction period, work simultaneously began on the construction of another sister, Mein Schiff 6. Meyer Turku were also involved in the construction of predecessor, Mein Schiff 4 launched in 2014.

In the following year, Mein Schiff 4 made a first call to Dun Laoghaire with an anchorage much closer to the harbour compared to other callers of recent years. The south Dublin Bay port still awaits a planning decision on the controversial cruise-berth to enable such sized ships and even larger to dock within the harbour. 

Published in Cruise Liners

Dublin Port today announced the launch of an open call to artists and arts projects to create site-specific works in Dublin Port as part of Port Perspectives, its latest soft values project.

Dublin Port is commissioning a series of original and innovative public artworks and installations, reflecting contemporary art practice. The commissioned artworks will respond specifically to the built environment and local areas in and around Dublin Port, enhancing the public realm to draw audiences and port visitors, while creating a living exhibition and cultural trail. The call for artists will be available at www.businesstoarts.ie/portperspectives.
The inspiration for this project comes from Dublin Port’s increasing interaction with the arts. In recent years a series of commissioned arts projects have provided an effective and powerful means to tell the story of Dublin Port and are helping to renew the historical link between the Port and the City. A central objective of Dublin Port’s soft values strategy is rebuilding these links, which have been traditionally forged through long-standing education, cultural, sporting and community initiatives, and now the arts.
Port Perspectives continues Dublin Port’s legacy and builds upon commissions such as Starboard Home, a partnership with the National Concert Hall that went on to feature at this year’s Electric Picnic, Dublin Ships created by Cliona Harmey with Dublin City Council and the restoration of the Diving Bell on Sir John Rogerson's Quay.
Port Perspectives also includes an exhibition of work by the Belgian artist Eugeen Van Mieghem at Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane in 2017 and an arts engagement programme curated by Professor Declan McGonagle.
Open Call for Artists
The commission is open to practitioners in the areas of visual Arts and film including projections. There is an open category for artists and arts projects that are keen to respond to the commissioning brief. Proposals may be made for temporary and permanent artworks and a number of locations within Dublin Port have been selected as locations. These include Poolbeg Lighthouse, the Half Moon Battery, Dublin Port Company’s Headquarters and the North Quay Extension close to the East Link Bridge. Details of all Dublin Port locations are included in the open call documentation.

Business to Arts will project manage the open call. The deadline for applications is October 10th. Artists can find more information and learn about the application process on the Business to Arts website.

The shortlisted artists will be notified in November 2016 and the commissioned artists will be announced in January 2017.

Eamonn O Reilly, Chief Executive of Dublin Port says: “One of the challenges for Dublin Port is to create stronger links between the Port and the City, and through the arts we are working to achieve that. With Port Perspectives we want to bring the port and surrounding areas to life, using new and original artworks that inspire, engage and tell the story of Dublin Port to audiences far and wide. This is a project that celebrates both the visual arts and built environment where we live and work, and one that will greatly enhance the quality of the public realm at the port. I look forward to seeing how artists respond to the brief and working with them on this exciting new initiative.”

Commenting on the announcement Andrew Hetherington, Chief Executive of Business to Arts said: “Enabling artists to create new artworks and using Dublin Port as creative inspiration is at the heart of recent Dublin Port projects like Starboard Home and the Diving Bell. Port Perspectives will see Dublin Port and its partners nurture and develop new surprising and dynamic artworks in this exciting and ever changing part of the city. During 2017 and beyond, the arts will be front and centre for all visitors to Dublin Port and I can’t wait to see what will be imagined and created by the commissioned artists.”

Published in Dublin Port
Tagged under

#Ferry2Cruise – A cruiseship with an unconventional background called into Dublin Port this morning, Ocean Majesty, which in another guise was a car ferry built fifty years ago to serve Spanish island services, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The veteran vessel, an increasing rarity these days in the cruise industry, was the former side-loading car ferry, Juan March launched in 1966 to operate Mediterranean and Atlantic services.

The Albatros-class ferry, one of a quartet, was operated by Transmediterranea on Spain-Balearics routes and also those from the mainland to the Canary Islands.

Following a sale to Majesty International Cruises, through a Greek dockyard a major conversion costing more than US$ 50 million took place in 1994.

The conversion radically altered her appearance (click for photo) notably her superstructure and removal of twin funnel uptakes and forward cargo hold. Despite the work, she retains her classic traditional sweeping hull form lines and aptly a cruiser stern. In addition the work increased tonnage to 10,417 gross.

MIC charter the Ocean Majesty to a variety of operators, among them Hansa Touristik. The 672 capacity cruiseship call to Dublin Port is only for eight hours and forms the 9th cruise of the German charter operators 2016 season.

Ocean Majesty had departed Hamburg last week on an 11-day cruise. So far ports of call have been Rosyth, Kirkwall, Ullapool, Greenock in Scotland and yesterday Belfast.

Early this afternoon, Ocean Majesty is to depart bound for Plymouth. Following her Cornish call, she heads through the English Channel to spend an overnight call in the Pool of London.

The final day will be a passage in the North Sea before the cruise culminates in the German city.

Published in Cruise Liners

#CorkDockyard – Cork Dockyard, now the only large dry-dock in the Republic following the closure of the Dublin facility earlier this year, is today to receive a vessel of a client that used the capital’s last dry-dock, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The arrival of Arklow Rose to Cork Dockyard saw the 2,999 gross tonnage general cargoship enter dry-dock at 11 o’clock this monring. Arklow Shipping, were one of the major clients of the Dublin Graving Docks that generated around €2.5m annually and handed around 20 ships.

The Dutch flagged ship is one of oldest in the Arklow Shipping fleet, dating to 2002, while the latest newbuild, Arklow Valley was launched in the Netherlands only last month.

The final ever ship to use the Dublin shiprepair and conversion facility was Arklow Fame in April. This vessel of a different class, however has almost the same hull dimensions of Arklow Rose, of almost 90m long, a beam of around 14.5m and draft approximately 7.20m.

As an island nation, the loss of the strategic Dublin Graving Docks (to be in-filled for Dublin Port’s €227m Alexandra Basin Redevelopment project), reduces the ability to cater for certain sized vessels. The capital’s dry-dock (220.00m long) could cater for larger vessels than Cork Dockyard’s (165.50m long). Asides shiprepair, conversion, the Rushbrooke yard (formerly Verolme Cork Dockyard) also carries out marine engineering and fabrication.

Another factor is the graving dock entrance width at Cork Dockyard, which is also narrower than what the Dublin yard offered. This led to the former ferry operator, Swansea-Cork Ferries 15,127 gross tonnage route ship, Superferry having to use the Dublin facility instead. The 137m long ferry had a beam of 23.4m while the graving dock entrance at Cork Dockyard was only 21.3m.

It should be noted this measurement is exactly the same of the breadth extreme of ASL’s ‘S’ class bulkers, for example, Arklow Meadow. The South Korean built bulker which operates deepsea trading was accommodated in the Dublin dry-dock, that was completed in 1957.

An adjacent much older graving dock dating to 1860 and only in-filled in 2008 is where there are plans for the site to be excavated!... for story and photo including the bulker dry-docked click here.

Published in Cork Harbour

#Trade8%Up - Trade statistics at Dublin Port Company show a half-year growth of 8.0%, the strongest six-month performance ever. The extraordinary growth trend for the first half of the year builds on last year’s record throughput of 32.8 million gross tonnes.

Total throughput (imports and exports) for the six months to the end of June was 17.3 million gross tonnes, with 3,782 ship arrivals during the period. Both imports and exports grew strongly, with exports ahead by 7.5% and imports even stronger at 8.3%.

Showing further improvement in the domestic economy, imports rose to more than 10 million gross tonnes on the same trading period, while exports exceeded 7 million gross tonnes.

Imports of new cars and commercial vehicles continued to grow very strongly with more than 60,000 new vehicles imported through Dublin Port in the first six months of the year, an 11.3% rise on the same period last year. This growth is reflected in the 32.8% increase in trade vehicle imports in the second quarter alone, in anticipation of demand for new “162” vehicle licence plates.

Growth surged in the largest parts of Dublin Port’s business; Ro-Ro freight trailers and Lo-Lo containers. Ro-Ro increased by 8.4% to 460,587 units in the first six months while Lo-Lo containers grew by 10.1% to 330,530 TEU as the domestic economy continued to draw imported goods from overseas markets.

Eamonn O’Reilly, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: “Dublin Port is experiencing extraordinary growth at present. Total throughput increased by 8.0% in the first six months of the year. With just half the year gone, it now seems almost certain that 2016 will be a record year by some distance.

“Having seen growth of 17.3% in the three years to 2015 and with such a strong first half to 2016, creating additional port capacity is an imperative for us”.

The latest trading figures come as Dublin Port Company has purchased a motorway connected 44-hectare land bank adjacent to Dublin Airport to create a new External Port Logistics Zone. The new lands provide an additional 17% to the port’s existing estate of 260 hectares. The land bank is just 14km from the port and will allow Dublin Port to relocate non-core activities from the port, thereby freeing up existing port lands for the transit storage of cargo.

In addition the land back will provide storage areas for slower moving cargoes. Dublin Port Company committed in its Masterplan to maximising the use of its existing lands. The new External Port Logistics Zone, which will be developed over the coming years, is a landmark initiative to achieve this objective.

“While construction of the €230 million Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project is progressing, Dublin Port must also push ahead with other projects to stay ahead of growth. Our decision to acquire a 44-hectare land bank within easy reach of the port is another major step towards providing additional capacity at the port as we prepare long-term for future growth.” added Eamonn O’Reilly.

Published in Dublin Port
Page 13 of 49

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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