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#Landbank - The State-owned commercial company that operates Dublin Port, reports The Irish Independent is poised to buy 40 hectares of motorway-connected land adjacent to the capital to support its future growth.

The Dublin Port Company which is enjoying a record growth phase and is set to pay a €10.9m dividend to the State this year, has just commenced a €230m redevelopment of the Alexandra Basin.

The redevelopment, which involves rebuilding more than 40pc of the port and increasing the basin's depth to 10 metres, will allow the port to host some of the world's largest cruise ships, such as the 18-deck MSC Splendida and the Disney Magic, whose horn blast plays an excerpt from Disney's famous flagship tune,

The redevelopment, which will allow cruise ship passengers to travel by Luas or foot to Dublin city centre, will be completed by 2020. 

However, Ireland's premier deep-water port, currently operating on a 260-hectare area of land, plans to double its container business from 20 Twenty-foot Equivalent Units (TEU) per annum to 40 TEUs and to handle 60 million tonnes a year by 2040.

The DPC handled some 32.8 million gross tonnes last year and has paid dividends of almost €90m to the State since 2007.
To ensure that its estate maximises its cargo-handling capacity, the DPC is contemplating the acquisition of a significant, 40-hectare (almost 99 acres) land bank adjacent to the motorway and accessible by the Dublin Port Tunnel.

Over 30pc of all goods arriving in Dublin port remain within the M50 area, while 60pc of all goods arriving at the port remain within 80km of the port.
It is anticipated that the motorway-connected site will, in future, accommodate non-core activities, such as trade car storage.

The company did not respond to queries about the planned acquisition. For more on the story, click here. 

Published in Dublin Port

#FrigateSisters – A pair of former Dutch Navy frigates now part of the Belgium Navy docked within two hours of each other in Dublin Port yesterday for a weekend visit, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The first frigate to arrive BNS Louise-Marie (F931) docked at lunchtime with the attendance of port tugs when berthing at the North Wall Quay Extension. This quay is located next to the former East-Link Bridge which in May was officially unveiled as the Tom Clarke Bridge after a prominent figure of the 1916 Easter Rising.

The 3,328 tonnes BNS Louise-Marie frigate having sailed from Plymouth was joined by sister BNS Leopold I (F930), which had sailed from Bergen on the west coast of Norway. The latter vessel had moored alongside her counterpart, with both bows of the frigates facing seawards.

BNS Leopold I is a ‘Karel Doorman’-class frigate of the Naval Component of the Belgian Armed Forces, however originally she was the Royal Netherlands Navy’s HNLMS Karel Doorman (F827).

Likewise BNS Louise-Marie, was a former member of the Dutch fleet and as a sister named HNLMS Willem van der Zaan (F829) until they were purchased by the Belgiums in 2005. The leadship entered service for the Belgium Navy in 2007 and her sister was commissioned the following year.

Each of the 123m long frigates has a crew totalling 145 (15 officers, 70 non-commissioned officers and 60 sailors). Among the main weapons are eight Harpoon SSM and 16 x NATO Seasparrows and a single SGE-30 Goalkeeper. Also can be equipped is a Lynx or NH90 Helicopter.

During this month, BNS Leopold I had tested anti-ship missiles as part of a NATO flotilla that involved nations from Denmark, France, Netherlands, Norway, Spain and Turkey.

Last month during the May Bank Holiday a trio of Belgium Navy vessels also paid a courtesy call to the capital. On that occasion this involved an auxiliary command and logistical support ship, BNS Godetia.

At the beginning of next month, the annual Belgium Navy Days (1-2 July) will be held in Zeebrugge, where the naval base will be open to the public. Both of the frigates are to attend along with command and oceanographic survey ships.

Published in Naval Visits

#DumpingRecordResponse - A record number of submissions to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been received in response to Dublin Port’s most recent application to dump spoil in Dublin Bay, reports Lorna Siggins of The Irish Times. 

A total of 780 submissions from public bodies, non-governmental organisations and individuals have been received in relation to the €230 million Alexandra Basin redevelopment project.

The Irish Underwater Council warns contaminants could damage a special area of conservation (SAC) as previously reported on Afloat.ie in regards to Rockabill Dalkey Island. 

The EPA said this was the highest number of submissions received on a dumping at sea permit application since it assumed responsibility for this function in 2010. However, it will not be holding an oral hearing on the application as this is not allowed for in the current legislation.

An Bord Pleanála has already approved the Alexandra Basin redevelopment. At an estimated cost of €230 million it has been described as the single largest infrastructural investment project in the history of the port.

It aims to facilitate larger cruise ships in the port, including a twin berth farther up the Liffey beside the former Point Depot (now the 3 Arena).

As part of this, Dublin Port plans to dispose of a large part of some 6.4 million cubic metres of material on the Burford bank 5km southeast of Howth, which is in a special area of conservation (SAC) from Rockabill to Dalkey Island.

For more The Irish Times has the story here.  

 

Published in Dublin Port

Applications are invited for the position of Harbour Master

The Company

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, private limited company, wholly owned by the State and reporting to the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is the largest port on the island of Ireland and, in 2015, had a record cargo throughput of 32.8m gross tonnes. In addition, Dublin Port is a major passenger hub with two million passengers passing through each year on both ferries and cruise ships. By international standards, Dublin is a very busy port with over 15,000 ship movements annually.

Dublin Port Company has responsibility for a harbour area extending over Dublin Bay and additional responsibility for a still wider pilotage district including Dun Laoghaire Harbour.
The Company provides port infrastructure operated by private sector companies operating in competitive markets. The Port has a ten kilometre entrance channel, more than seven kilometers of berths (quay walls and jetties), a fleet of port craft (including pilot boats and tugs), eight ramps for Ro-Ro operations and a land area of 260 hectares.
The Port is situated at the heart of Dublin Bay and is immediately adjacent to protected environmental sites of national and international importance. It is also bounded by residential and commercial areas.
The Company’s business is growing rapidly and the Port is being developed on the basis of the Masterplan 2012 to 2040. The first major Masterplan project, the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR) Project, is currently being constructed. As part of this project, the Port’s ruling depth will be increased to -10.0m CD and more than three kilometres of berths will be constructed or reconstructed to provide capacity for longer and deeper ships.

The Position
The position of Harbour Master is key in the safe and efficient management of the Port. The Harbour Master is a member of the Executive Management Team, reporting to the Chief Executive. The Harbour Master’s primary operational responsibilities are to ensure the Port’s marine activities operate safely and efficiently.

The Harbour Master has direct managerial responsibility for operations in a number of key areas including pilotage, towage, berth allocation and VTS. Given the location of Dublin Port, the Harbour Master also has a wider responsibility for leisure and other craft in Dublin Bay and in the River Liffey.
The role requires an in-depth understanding of ship operations in all modes including Ro-Ro passenger and freight ferries; container ships; bulk carriers of all types; oil tankers; and cruise ships.
The Harbour Master is responsible for all aspects of the operations of the Port’s Harbour Function including the management of a skilled staff of 60 and the management of a large financial budget.

The Person
To qualify for consideration, candidates must have a valid STCW II/2 Certificate of Competency as Master, (unlimited) valid for service in the Irish Mercantile Marine. Candidates should have at least three years seagoing experience as Master or Chief Officer of a merchant vessel and/or three years experience as a Harbour Master, Deputy Harbour Master or Assistant Harbour Master in a comparable port.
The successful candidate will have to demonstrate the required high level of expertise in the operational dimensions of the role; the ability to motivate and manage a skilled workforce operating around the clock on every day in the year; financial and commercial acumen in respect of both the Company’s business and that of our customers; the ability to develop and maintain relationships with a wide range of stakeholders both nationally and internationally and the ability to communicate clearly and authoritatively both verbally and in writing.

To apply please send full personal, career and current remuneration details to:

Mr. Pat Ward
Head of Corporate Services,
Dublin Port Company,
Port Centre,
Alexandra Road,
Dublin 1.
D01 H4C6

Closing date 8th July 2016

Download PDF of advertisement below

Published in Dublin Port

#1860dockExcavation! - Arklow Fame (2006/2,998grt) the last ever ship to be dry-docked in Dublin Port that closed a month ago, was back in the port today at the Boliden Tara mines facility, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Dublin Graving Docks (DGD) Ltd closed with the loss of 26 full-time employees as the shiprepair, maintenance and conversion facility operated under license of the Dublin Port Company expired at the end of April. The site of the 220m long Graving Dock No. 2 (built 1957) was the largest in the state and is to be in-filled as part of DPC plans to increase space capacity as part of the €227m Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR) project to cater for increasingly larger cargoships.

Given the name of the former dock yard company, what about the other dock? That was Graving Dock No. 1 (dating to 1860) which was in-filled less than a decade ago to increase hard-standing area for ro-ro freight operations of an expanding terminal next to the DPC’s headquarters of the Port Centre building.

The final vessel to use Graving Dock No.1 took place in May 2006 but not for standard repairs but most surprisingly was for scrapping! This involved a 1954 built Tonga flagged converted cargoship used for livestock service between Dover-Dunkerque and possibly from Dublin too from where the 836 tonnes vessel was impounded by Irish authorities in 2003.

The veteran vessel was left to languish in port and Alda K having had four names over a career spanning almost half a century would never see service again. The final chapter of this small ship ended when DGD Ltd began breaking up the the vessel in Graving Dock No. 1. The sight of this activity in the capital was most surreal to observe and something one would expect overseas.

Ironically as part of the ABR project, Graving Dock No. 1 which is a listed structure is to be excavated, despite it been in filled less than a decade ago in late 2008. The site is to be developed into a new arts and industrial heritage visitor attraction centre, located next to the port’s first dedicated cruise terminal along the North Quay Wall Extension. Currently this is where P&O Ferries operate from ro-ro terminal no. 3.

The double berth €30m terminal is to accommodate some of the world’s largest cruiseships and as well to been located closer to the city-centre. Currently the largest cruiseships can only be handled at berths alongside Ocean Pier which have deeper berths than those upriver at the North Wall Extension next to the Tom Clarke Bridge, until recently known as the East-Link toll-bridge.

Published in Dublin Port

#CruiseEurope2016 – Cruise Europe’s 2016 conference takes place for the first time in the Irish capital this week (31 May- 2 June). The prestigious three-day conference is to attract over 200 delegates from leading cruise destinations to the event co-hosted by Dublin Port Company and Dublin City Council, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The conference coincides with no fewer than seven cruiseliners calling to the capital this week and in a record breaking season with 113 calls scheduled this year. The cruiseships will bring more than 180,000 visitors to experience the city’s sights and attractions. Among those calls, four are turnaround cruises, which will see passengers travel to Dublin Port to begin their cruise.

A notable highlight of the season so far was the first and only Irish port of call for Disney Cruise Line’s impressive 300m long two funnelled Disney Magic which made a maiden voyage to Irish shores last Thursday bringing 3,650 passengers and crew.

Also making an impression in early May was the return call to Dublin Port of MSC Splendida with 4,600 passengers and crew. At 333m the giant ship operated by MSC Cruises is the 11th longest cruiseship in the world and last summer she became the longest vessel ever to visit the capital. Operated by MSC Cruises the ship has also called to Cobh last year and this season.

According to the Chairman of Cruise Europe, Captain Michael McCarthy of Port of Cork Company, the conference represents an opportunity for delegates to nurture long-term relationships, discuss and debate operational issues, regulatory policies, and to explore new ventures and markets. The conference will also be a great opportunity to showcase Ireland to the cruise industry as a destination to all the major cruise lines and service suppliers of the cruise industry worldwide. 

Cruise Europe represents 120 ports and associate members on the continent. The goal of the organisation is to have cruise companies, ports and likely destinations working together in a unified manner to ensure safe and enhanced experiences for cruise passengers.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

Dublin Port Company has opened a new state-of-the-art Seafarers’ Centre at Dublin Port following a €500,000 investment in the facility. The new Seafarers’ Centre was unveiled today at an official opening attended by guest of honour, the Lord Mayor of Dublin Mayor Críona Ní Dhálaigh, who is also Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port.
The Seafarers’ Centre breathes new life into the site of the old Odlums flour mill. Housed in the former Odlums workers’ canteen, which had been in use up to the mill’s closure in 2012, the Centre now provides a base for vital services to sailors docking in the port, an essential workforce of the city’s economy. Features of the old canteen building such as decking, beams and the original exterior wall have been retained and preserved as part of the new design.
As Dublin Port’s first custom-built Seafarers’ Centre, it will support over 7,500 visiting seafarers a year arriving from all over the world, typically from countries such as India, China, Ukraine, Russia and the Philippines.
In addition to Dublin Port’s €500,000 investment, the International Transport Workers’ Federation has committed €55,000 in funding towards the completion of the Centre, helping to support its role in representing the best interests of transport workers globally.
Features of Dublin Port’s purpose-built Seafarers’ Centre include free Wi-Fi access for sailors to contact family and loved ones while ashore, cooking and dining facilities, and a relaxation and recreation space including a pool table, library and TV den with beanbags.
The new Centre also brings together two long-standing traditions in caring for seafarers in Dublin, the Anglican Mission to Seafarers (The Flying Angel) and the Catholic Apostleship of the Sea (Stella Maris). Both organisations will operate together under one roof at Dublin Port to provide spiritual guidance and friendship to seafarers of all faiths, and those of none. The Flying Angel will relocate to the Seafarers’ Centre from its existing location, while Stella Maris’ presence at the Centre will complement the organisation’s existing operation at its city centre location on Beresford Place.
Ardmhéara Críona Ní Dhálaigh said at the official opening; “I mo cháil oifigiúil mar Ardmhéara agus Aimiréil Oinigh Chalafort Bhaile Átha Cliath, tá an-áthas orm an t-Ionad Mairnéalaigh nua seo a oscailt.
I commend Dublin Port for creating such a welcoming facility for the thousands of seafarers who visit our shores and make a valuable contribution to our city and society. It’s wonderful to see the Catholic Apostleship of the Sea and the Anglican Mission to Seafarers working in tandem to continue their respective traditions of caring for seafarers, and providing these workers with a home from home.”
Chief Executive of Dublin Port Company Eamonn O’Reilly said; “We are delighted to open Dublin Port’s new purpose-built Seafarers’ Centre. It means that Dublin Port can provide sailors working thousands of miles from home with a space to rest, socialise and connect with family and friends under the care of Stella Maris and the Flying Angel. The Centre is a fine example of sustainable development in practice at Dublin Port. Odlums is an iconic part of Dublin Port’s industrial heritage, and that makes today’s opening particularly special.”

Published in Dublin Port

Dublin Port today became the first – and only – Irish port of call for Disney Magic on her maiden voyage to Irish shores. The ship’s 3,650 passengers, cast and crew were greeted by an entertainment spectacle on the quayside in Dublin Port. The 300m, 11-deck luxury liner is one of 113 cruise ships scheduled to call at Dublin Port in 2016. Pictured were two characters onboard Disney Magic.  At the same time this morning, the German Liner Mein Schiff 1 has docked off Dun Laoghaire Harbour

She arrived in the early hours of this morning carrying over 2,700 passengers and 950 cast and crew. The ship’s passengers were greeted by a ‘Game of Thrones’ inspired entertainment spectacle on the quayside in Dublin Port featuring music, drummers, dancers, entertainers, with Irish hounds and handlers.
As passengers disembarked they received a Cruise Dublin Visitor Pass, the new visitor card launched by Cruise Dublin, the Cruise Tourism Development and Marketing agency established to grow Dublin as Ireland’s premier port of choice for cruise. The pass provides special admission to a range of historic, cultural and sporting attractions, as well as incentives to shop and eat out at participating retailers, bars and restaurants in the city.
Dublin is the only Irish port of call for Disney Magic as part of a 12 night transatlantic cruise starting in Port Canaveral, Florida and finishing in Dover, England. The selection by Disney Cruise Line of Dublin as its chosen destination in Ireland highlights Dublin’s growing international reputation as a marquee destination for cruise tourism. Disney Cruise Line now joins a long list of the world’s largest cruise lines choosing to routinely call to Dublin Port. She will visit Dublin Port again on 13th June 2016.
On board, the ship encapsulates the glamour of the golden age of ocean travel. The ship’s Art Deco interior features specially commissioned paintings, sculptures and woodwork, as well as rare animation cells from the Disney archive. Awash with Disney inspired dining, theatre, leisure and entertainment facilities, the cruise line prides itself on offering age-appropriate play spaces and activities to provide everyone from toddlers to late teens with a Disney experience on board.

DisneyMagicDublinPort 44
Pat Ward, Head of Corporate Services at Dublin Port Company, said; “Disney Magic is a spectacular ship and a very welcome sight for the city today. She is one of 113 cruise calls scheduled for Dublin Port this year, and undoubtedly a highlight of the season. Cruise is a dynamic business, and driven by passenger demand. As a result of that demand, we expect this to be Dublin Port’s biggest year on record for cruise. The season now routinely stretches to December, and the type of passengers arriving include younger families and those looking to explore the city unaccompanied. In response to those trends, the new Cruise Dublin Visitor Pass will help passengers make the most of their visit, while helping to support the city’s retailers and tourism offering.”

At 300 metres long, Disney Magic is at the upper limit of Dublin Port’s operational limit on ship length, i.e. able to enter Dublin Port and turn within the River Liffey.

Work has already commenced on the €230m ABR Project which will expand capacity in Dublin Port and will be largely completed in four years. The ABR Project, once complete, will mean that larger ships will be able to routinely call at Dublin Port, turn within the expanded Alexandra Basin West and berth as far upriver as East Link Bridge.

Published in Cruise Liners
Tagged under

#DisneyDublin - Disney Magic is to be one of the highlights of Dublin Port's cruise season and as the first Irish port to welcome Disney Cruise Line, a subsidiary of the famous Walt Disney Company, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the call next Thursday of the 300m long Disney Magic, only 33 short of the port's record holder MSC Splendida, will have 3,650 people on board visiting the capital. The 84,000 tonnes cruiseship has a 2,700 passenger capacity and they are accommodated in 875 staterooms. In total there are 11 public decks and a crew of 950.

The call by Disney will represent further confidence by the sector in choosing to make Dublin Port a destination in a season scheduled to bring 180,000 visitors from 113 calls. Of those calls four are turnaround cruises, where cruise-goers travel to the capital to begin their cruise.

The cruiseship was built in 1998 by the Italian yard of Fincantieri and the then newbuild was homeported in Port Canaveral, Florida until transferred to Europe almost a decade ago in 2007.

This led Disney Magic to make a repositioning voyage across the Atlantic Ocean and beyond when based out of Barcelona to embark inaugural cruises in the Mediterranean.

Disney Magic has an appearance that clearly echoes to the era of the trans-Atlanctic liners.

The design of having two funnels and painted in red and topped in black pays homage to liners like Normandie, France (see, large containership/longsest cruiseship). This iconic liner latter became converted into a cruiseship as the Norway, that anchored off Dun Laoghaire in the mid-1990’s.

Published in Cruise Liners

#WorldsLargest – The World's largest pure car and truck carrier (PCTC) vessel, Höegh Target, with a 14 deck capacity for 8,500 car equivalent units, made another call to Dublin Port today along with a giant cruiseship, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The arrival from Rotterdam of the 76,420 gross tonnes PCTC, is impressive given not just because of the sheer overall size of the leadship of six ‘Horizon’ class Chinese built newbuilds, but also the imposing square shaped upper superstructure at the bow. This compared to a circular conventional car-carrier design, is to maximise additional space to enable a total deck area equal to the size of 10 football fields or 71,400 sqm. Of the 14 decks, five are capable of been 'lifted'. 

It is claimed by Norwegian operator, Höegh Autoliners, that the 12 meter width ramp could easily crowd 75 elephants! on the stern ramp which takes 375 tonnes of cargo weight. The final Horizon class that are Post Panamax vessels, is to be delivered this year and they are each estimated to emit 50 per cent less CO2 per car transported than a standard car carrier.

At 200m in length, Höegh Target is some 89m short of the ‘Grand’ class cruiseship, Caribbean Princess which too is docked in port.

As reported today, the 19 deck Caribbean Princess with more than 3,000 passenger capacity called from Cobh, Cork Harbour and is berthed at Ocean Pier. While on the other side of the pier is where Höegh Target docked within Alexandra Basin east.

Both vessels present a temporary high-rise environment on the port estate, where such large vessels are increasing in number to the port. This has led to the Dublin Port Company’s ABR project costing €277m, the largest single capital investment project in the port for 200 years.

The ABR is to permit very large ships with even deeper drafts following major dredging, to dock inside the port.

Published in Dublin Port
Page 13 of 48

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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