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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Port

In a highly unusual procedure, a tanker took on bunkers (loading of fuel) while anchored in Dublin Bay. The procedure took place on 2 August when the Whitstar (2,159gt) moored alongside the larger Pembroke Fisher (9,356gt) writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Whitstar had arrived from Dover to conduct bunkering. The vessel approached the Pembroke Fisher to tie mooring ropes amidships, fore and aft.

The bunkering took several hours to complete. With bunkering complete, the Whitstar proceeded to the Clyde. Incidently, a fleetmate of Whitstar, the Whitchampion arrived at Dublin port earlier during the summer to load bunkers for a large cruiseship. While the re-fueled Pembroke Fisher returned to anchor overnight off Dalkey Island.

Prior to the bunkering operation, Pembroke Fisher had spent several days at anchorage south of Dalkey Island after discharging petroleum products at Dublin Port.

It is also unusual for commercial shipping to take anchorage off Dalkey Island while close to Killiney Bay. Otherwise, it is the norm for vessels to anchor in Dublin Bay with the majority of ships taking anchorage south-east off Dun Laoghaire.

The next day, Pembroke Fisher weighed anchor and firstly set a course for the Kish Lighthouse and then altered to proceed south down the Irish Sea bound for Milford Haven. The Welsh port is the location of one of the largest oil refineraries in the UK.

bunker

Whitstar moored alongside Pembroke Fisher on 2 August. The smaller tanker was transferring bunkers in a rare operation in Dublin Bay. Photo: Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Dublin Bay

A ship's pass dated 1687, signed by King James II and Samuel Pepys, which was acquired by the Dublin Port & Docks board in 1924, was presented to the National Library of Ireland today by Enda Connellan, CEO, Dublin Port Company who noted that "Dublin Port Company is delighted to present this interesting and rare historical document to the National Library of Ireland. This will ensure that it is appropriately conserved and displayed. In its new home it will also be more accessible to the public."

The pass is one of the few known examples of 17th century ships' passes in the world, with others held at the National Archives in Kew, London and at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

The example presented to the National Library of Ireland was designed to provide passage for the merchant vessel the Mary of Cork, free from interference by English warships or warships belonging to states maintaining diplomatic relations with England.

The vessel left Dublin port in late 1687, bound for the Canary Islands. At the time, the Canary Islands were major exporters of sugar and Malvasia, a fortified white wine which travelled well and was extremely popular in Britain. The Mary of Cork may have been trading in such foodstuffs, in return for products such as salted Irish beef.

The vessel was manned by a crew of five and captained by Zachary Peebuchet.

The Mary of Cork ship's pass was issued at the Court of Whitehall on 29 September 1687 and was signed by King James II (Lord High Admiral 1685-1688) and Samuel Pepys (in his capacity as Secretary to the Admiralty). On 18 April 1688, the ship's pass was returned to Ireland, where it was entered into the registry of the High Court of Admiralty of Ireland by Thomas Williamson. It was acquired by the Dublin Port & Docks Board in 1924, and will soon be on display in the National Library's Department of Manuscripts.

Published in Dublin Bay

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port (today) on 4th August, The World, the first ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.

 

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port on 4th August, The World,
the first and only ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the
capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept in
that passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of staying
onboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury private
penthouse suites.
There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. The
luxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,
complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom and
verandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any one
time, varies between 150-200 people.
As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any private
community, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that are
available for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting a
residence from a selection of units.
Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,
delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimming
pools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deck
there is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authentic
grass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck and
plonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within
96 hours.
The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is docked
close to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestrians
alike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7
August).
Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the Point
Village provides an excellent venue to take views of The World and
Dublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early on
Sunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11
August).
The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,
made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during those
heady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over
3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.
The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continous
cruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Kloster
junior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended to
order a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled down
due to customer demand.
In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.
After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010
devoted to exploring Antartica.

The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept inthat passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of stayingonboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury privatepenthouse suites.

There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. Theluxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom andverandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any onetime, varies between 150-200 people.

As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any privatecommunity, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that areavailable for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting aresidence from a selection of units.

Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimmingpools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deckthere is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authenticgrass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck andplonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within96 hours.

The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is dockedclose to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestriansalike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7August).

Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the PointVillage provides an excellent venue to take views of The World andDublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early onSunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11August).

The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during thoseheady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.

The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continouscruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Klosterjunior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended toorder a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled downdue to customer demand.

In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010devoted to exploring Antartica.

 

The_World_moored_alongside_North_Wall_Quay_Extension__Dublin._Photo_Jehan_Ashmore-ShipSNAPS_4

The World moored alongside North Wall Quay Extension,  Dublin. Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Ports & Shipping

On Monday 26 July, the Grande Senegal, a brand new vessel that was only launched this year for Italian shipping giant, Grimaldi Lines, docked in Dublin after a 9,600km voyage from Douala, Cameroon, along Africa's mid-western coast.
Onboard was a large-scale consignment of Irish Defence Forces military equipment from Chad, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The charter of the 47,218 gross tonnes marked the final phase in the withdrawel since April of Irish Defence Forces from UN-peacekeeping duties in the troubled land-locked central African state. The Irish-based troops had already flown home in advance of the military hardware.
In total, 3,000 tonnes of equipment was shipped which included 208 TEU (20-foot long containers) 75 trucks, 4x4s, armoured vehicles and an assortment of trailers and fuel bowsers.
The cargo was first moved from Defence Force facilities based at Goz Beida, in eastern Chad, across 900km of desert to the Chadian capital, N'Djamena. From there the equipment was divided with sensitive cargo flown to the port of Douala. The remaining cargo was taken on another 900km road-trip to Ngaoundere, in northern Cameroon. Upon arrival at Ngaoundere, the cargo was transferred by rail for 650km to Douala, finally completing the journey to the African port.
The transportation was undertaken during the impending threat of the rainy season which can pose serious difficulties for all modes of
wheeled transport to the extent that renders progress to be difficult if not impossible. The major logisticical exercise was one of the most
challenging operations experienced by the Defence Forces.
With the equipment loaded at Douala, Grande Senegal set sail on 13 July bound for Dublin. The long-distance passage took a fortnight to arrive at Dublin, where the ConRo (Containers and Roll-On Roll-Off) vessel discharged vehicles through the stern-mounted door ramp.
Once the equipment was disembarked at the quayside, the Gardai and Defence Forces provided joint escorts to the vehicle-conveys, to ensure a speedy exit out of the port, destined for military barracks. Grande Senegal is one of seven Grande 'Angola' class newbuilds built at the Uljanik Shipyard, Pula, Croatia. Each 210 metre-long ConRo vessel can combine a load of 2000 vehicles and 800 TEU, or alternatively a maximum of 1,360 TEU. The Grande Senegal departed Dublin the next day for Amsterdam.

The_new_multi-purpose

The new multi-purpose vessel, Grande  Senegal fitted with stern-vehicle ramp, berthed at Alexandra Basin, Dublin on 26 July. Photo © Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS
Published in Ports & Shipping

The Lord Mayor of Dublin and Admiral of Dublin Port, Cllr. Emer Costello, today performed the 522 year old "Casting of the Spear" ceremony at Dublin Port.

The "Casting of the Spear" dates as far back as 1488 when the then Lord Mayor, Thomas Mayler set out on his horse to ride the city's boundaries. Historical records show that he rode out onto the strand as far as a man might ride and from there he cast a spear into the sea. At that time, casting the spear demonstrated the extent of the city boundaries eastwards. From that day onwards each year the Lord Mayor of Dublin re-enacts this medieval ceremony.

The ceremony was re-enacted this morning when the Lord Mayor travelled out into Dublin Bay onboard a Dublin Port tug boat and launched a spear deep into Dublin Bay's cold waters, and once again marked the position of the city boundaries eastwards.

Dublin Port, as an organisation, has a long and remarkable history also, dating back over 300 years. There have been many famous moments and famous visitors in that time.

Casting_of_the_Spear-21-06-2010-IMG_7123-01_96

 

Pictured at the re-enactment of the 522 year tradition of 'Casting of the Spear' were: Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port and Lord Mayor of Dublin Emer Costello and Dublin Port Company Chief Executive Enda Connellan. Photo: Denis Bergin

Captain William Bligh (of "Mutiny on the Bounty" fame) has left a lasting legacy on the port and city. Bligh conducted a study of the tidal flows in Dublin Bay, which led to the construction of the Great South Wall. This construction has resulted in the formation of the present Bull Island, which did not exist in 1800. This amenity is now home to among other amenities two golf courses and an internationally renowned bird sanctuary.

Another interesting historical link with Dublin Port is the tale of the 'Ouzel Galley', an Irish merchant ship that set sail from Dublin Port in 1695. After failing to return for three years it was presumed lost at sea. In 1698 a panel comprising the city's most eminent merchants was set up to settle the question of insurance. The panel's ruling was that the ship had indeed been lost and that its owners and insurers should receive their due compensation. The galley's complement of thirty-seven crew and three officers were declared dead and the insurance was paid out.

However, after a further two years had elapsed, she mysteriously reappeared with her full complement of crew and a valuable cargo of spices and exotic goods. By this stage the insurance had been paid out on the in some cases the 'widows' of the sailors 'lost' at sea had remarried!
Speaking at the ceremony to mark the tradition of 'Casting the Spear' Lord Mayor of Dublin and Admiral of its Port, Cllr. Emer Costello, said: "It's a tremendous honour, as admiral of Dublin Port, to take part in such a treasured, time-honoured local tradition. Over the course of the last 500 years, Dublin Port has played an instrumental role in the development of our capital city. Having Ireland's biggest port so close to the city, in the heart of our capital, adds a great competitive advantage. As a gateway to European and international markets, Dublin Port continues to play a central role in supporting the country's return to economic growth".

Responding to the Admiral of the Port, Dublin Port Company Chief Executive Mr. Enda Connellan said: "Dublin Port is immensely proud of its heritage, its long links with the City and the contribution it has played in the life of this city and country. This ceremony reminds us of where Ireland's largest city has come from over the last 500 years and how the port has played its role in its development, facilitating €35 billion of trade per year and supporting 4,000 real jobs."

 

 

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

The plans to reclaim 21 hectares of land in Dublin Port have been rejected by An Bord Pleanála. The infill, Dublin Port claimed, would have dealt with the imminent capacity issues at the port, and would have increased capacity at the port by 50%, 

The plan was rejected on environmental grounds, with the area north of Alexandra Road on the port's eastern extremity designated for expansion.

The Port Company were stunned by the decision, which deemed the proposed infill area would have a detrimental impact on the south Dublin Bay and Tolka Estuary pSPA (proposed special protection area) designated under the EU Birds Directive.

Full Irish Times report on the decision is HERE

Published in Ports & Shipping
Tagged under

A Cruise liner berthed on the river Liffey this morning will draw a smile from Dubliners because of the giant red lips and eyes painted on the ship. The Aida Aura is a 203m long vessel carries 1400 passengers and is operated by the German unit of P&O Cruises.

Published in Dublin Bay

An interesting visitor to Dublin Bay this morning is the MS Fram, a 500-passenger capacity cruise ship that has been designed with a reinforced hull for cruising arctic waters. The Norwegian ship cruised from Cork overnight. It has a four star rating from www.choosingcruising.co.uk and more details are here. MS Fram is operated by the Hurtigruten ASA Group. The ship made its first maiden voyage to Greenland in May 2007.

Published in Dublin Bay

Gaff rigged and traditional boats are welcome to join the Dublin Bay Old Gaffers Association in a celebration of traditional sailing and music and craic on the week-end of May 28th-30th. It is part of Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club's annual regatta and

festival sponsored by Dublin Port Company.

The weekend will begin with registration and reception on Friday night followed by a race in Dublin Bay on Saturday Starting @11:30 at Poolbeg Lighthouse.

On Saturday evening there will be a Hog Roast, music and craic until late.

Sunday will include the Blessing Of The Boats at Poolbeg  followed by a Parade of sail up through the East link and the Samuel Beckett Bridges and returning back down to Poolbeg Marina.

Prize giving  will take place @17:00 hours in Poolbeg Club house. Sunday evening will conclude with Music and socialising .

Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club Have Kindly agreed to facilitate all registered and participating boats, free berths on the Marina for the week end.

Published in Dublin Bay
10th August 2009

Dublin Port Company

Dublin Port Company

Dublin Port, the largest port in Ireland, is situated in the heart of Ireland's vibrant capital city. Dublin Port Company's mission is to facilitate the flow of goods, passengers and information through the port.

Dublin Port, as an organisation, has a long and remarkable history, dating back 300 years from 1707 to 2007. There have been many famous moments and famous visitors in that time Captain William Bligh's (of 'Mutiny on the Bounty' fame) involvement in the Port in 1800 has left a lasting legacy.

Bligh conducted a study of the tidal flows in Dublin Bay, which led to the construction of the Great South Wall. This construction has resulted in the formation of the present Bull Island, which did not exist in 1800.

Another famous person, involved in the development of the Port was the famous Port engineer Bindon Blood Stoney. He designed the diving bell now located on Sir John Rogerson's Quay, which was used in the construction of the North Wall Extension. (Pictured: sugar storage at Custom House Docks). 

sugar_storage_custom_house_docks.jpg.jpg

Dublin Bay Guidance Notes for Leisure Craft

For all recreational craft using Dublin Port and Bay, compiled by Dublin Port Company in consultation with local yacht and boat clubs

Facts to bear in mind:

1. As both the number of large commercial ships and recreational craft using Dublin Port is increasing it is essential that close quarter situations do not arise.

2. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port normally have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They 'listen out' on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port’s jurisdiction.

3. Commercial vessels will follow the routes designated in the attached illustration. All recreational craft when obliged to navigate within such areas should do so with extreme caution following the Int. Collisions Regulations.

4. Large conventional commercial craft travel at a manoeuvering speeds of between 8 to 15 knots whilst within the ports jurisdiction. The lower limit varies from ship to ship and is 'as safe navigation permits'.

5. Ships will be traveling faster than you may estimate, even in congested waters.

6. Ships that are light or partially loaded, particularly in windy conditions, will require a higher minimum speed to remain under full control.

7. A large ship visible on the horizon may take no more than 10 minutes to reach you under clear conditions, under hazy conditions this time could be much less. At 10 knots a ship will travel a nautical mile in 6 minutes, at 15 knots it takes only 4 minutes to travel one nautical mile.

8. A large deep draught ship cannot easily avoid small craft in a narrow channel. It is up to leisure craft to keep clear (see Rule 9 Int. Collision Regs excerpt at end of this page).

9. A ship slowing down does not steer very well. It requires the action of its propeller to respond. When the propellor is going 'astern' the ship’s steering will be adversely affected.

10. As well as large cargo ships, a variety of working craft also use the port, tugs, pilot cutters, dredgers, fast ferries, barges under tow etc. In particular a towing line may be partly submerged and therefore potentially dangerous to other craft passing too close.

 

What should you do?

1. Avoid sailing in the buoyed channel area, avoid sailing within 0.5 nautical mile of the Dublin Bay buoy and in the separation schemes, (see illustration). This is especially critical in periods of reduced visibility. When obliged to cross the fairway, cross at right angles to the traffic flow. Also obey rule 9 of the Collision Regulations by either keeping to the starboard side of the channel or if the water depth allows outside the buoyed channel.

2. Keep a good lookout. Be aware of all ship movements, especially astern of you.

3. Do not underestimate the speed of ships. Allow plenty of time to take effective evasive action in the vicinity of large ships.

4. Be visible. At night make sure your navigation lights can be clearly seen. If you see the navigation lights of a vessel approaching and you think that he has not seen you, get out of the way. Also use a torch or search-light to illuminate the sails (if appropriate). Remember (as indicated in the attached illustration), from the bridge of a loaded container ship or large tanker the captain/pilot may lose sight of you a half a nautical mile ahead, although you can see that ship clearly from your vessel at all times.

5. Keep watch at night. You may have difficulty seeing a large ship approach, even on a clear night. In reduced visibility you may have little warning of its approach. If you see a black shadow against shore lights or as a growing shadow, at that point a close quarter situation is already imminent. Remember you cannot be easily seen at night (particularly in a background of lights) and judging distances at night can prove difficult.

6. Watch the ships navigation lights. If you see both ships sidelights you are dead ahead, follow the Int. Collision Regs. and any alteration of course should be early, substantial and be visible to the approaching ship. Be aware that ships alter course at the Dublin Bay buoy and No.3/No.4 buoys. Be aware of your position and the position of other vessels around you at all times.

7. Know the whistle signals (see illustration). Five or more short and rapid blasts on the ships whistle indicates the ship is in doubt about your action or the lack thereof. Check immediately if this signal was meant for you, if so take immediate and appropriate action. Three short blasts means 'my engines are going astern' one short blast means 'I am altering my course to starboard'. Two short blasts "I am altering my course to port".

8. Keep your VHF tuned to channel 12 the port working frequency, and have the volume high enough to hear above the noise of the engine. Listen for traffic information from Dublin Port V.T.S. Only if you are the controlling vessel in a flotilla of other vessels, and you observe a hazardous situation developing, or in the event of an emergency developing within the ports jurisdiction, you should transmit on VHF channel 12.

Remember CH 12 is Dublin Port’s primary working channel and used to manage port traffic. No private or unneccessary communications to take place on this channel.

dublin_bay_guidance_notes_lores3.jpg

 

Area 1 - from Dublin Bay Buoy to Poolbeg Lighthouse
Small craft shall not navigate inside the fairway and should remain outside the line of buoys. If it is necessary to cross the fairway, crossing should be at right angles.

Area 2 - Poolbeg Lighthouse to No. 14 Buoy
Small craft shall comply with the International Regulations for Prevention of  Collisions at Sea and shall keep as near to the outer limit of the channel which lies on her starboard side as is safe and practicable. Rule 9 does not apply outside the channel and craft may pass outside the buoys when and where it is safe to do so.  If it is necessary to cross the channel, e.g. to enter area 3, crossing should be at right angles, at a position abeam of the ESB Jetty (Berth 48).

Area 3 - No. 14 Buoy to the west
All small craft should pass along the south side of the channel, remaining as far as is practicable to that side.

General
All craft shall operate under power when within areas 2 and 3, but may additionally raise their sails outside the channel but not in the channel.

1. No sailing in the channel, craft should only cross at right angles when it is safe to do so.

2. Maintain a listening watch on channel VHF 12 and avoid unnecessary communication.

 

Keep a sharp lookout and keep clear of all shipping.

Attention of all skippers is drawn to the annual Notice to Mariners No. 7 concerning small craft.

Capt. David T. Dignam, Harbour Master. 31st March 2006

 

 

Collision Avoiding Check List

Avoid the busy shipping channels and routes. Cross them at right angles and as quickly as possible after checking that it is safe to do so. Recreational users of the port area are particularly requested to be familiar with the Int. Collision Regulations (particularly Rule 9), Dublin Port Bye Laws, Small Craft (Leisure) Regulations (see chartlet) and Local Notices to Mariners (particularly No.7). Information is also available on the Dublin Port web site, www. dublinport.ie

Remember:

• Keep a good lookout, particularly at night

• Do not under-estimate the speed of ships

• Be visible

• Watch the lights of other vessels

• Know the whistle signals

• Keep your VHF tuned to channel 12

• Obey any instructions given by Dublin Port VTS. They are also interested in your safety.

 

International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea

Rule 9 - Narrow Channels (Excerpt)

(a) A vessel proceeding along the course of a narrow channel or fairway shall keep as near to the outer limit of the channel or fairway, which lies on her starboard side as, is safe and practicable

(b) A vessel of less than 20 metres in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel which can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.

(c) A vessel engaged in fishing shall not impede the passage of any other vessel navigating within a narrow channel or fairway.

(d) A vessel shall not cross a narrow channel or fairway if such crossing impedes the passage of a vessel which can safely navigate only within such channel or fairway. The latter vessel may use the sound signal prescribed in Rule 34(d) or in doubt as to the intention of the crossing vessel.

 

Rule 10 – Traffic Separation Schemes (Excerpt)

(i) A vessel of less than 20 metres in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the safe passage of a power-driven vessel following a traffic lane.

two_boats_at_end.jpg
 

Dublin Port Company Port Centre, Alexandra Road, Dublin 1

Tel: 353 1 887 6000, Email: [email protected], fax 353 1 855 7400

 

Published in Irish Ports
Page 47 of 47

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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