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The first ever Liffey Skiffy 49er event launched on Friday afternoon to the spectacular backdrop of Dublin city centre providing colour, excitement and a view of high performance racing to the punters of our capital city. A four race series of thrills and spills was completed with Rory Fitzpatrick and Ross Mc Donald taking the overall victory from Ryan Seaton and Matt Mc Govern in the final medal race of the series. VIDEO over the fold!

Crashes and capsizes were on order for spectators from the first start with Ed Butler and Dermot Mc Murrough suffering a mainsail tear from the first start. Nin O'Leary also made the most of a capsize by back flipping from the boats wing once semi turtle! Many photos were made available from the event with the most notable making the front page of Saturday's Irish Times newspaper!

Many thanks go to the event sponsors OnBoard Surf Snow Sail, PR Reilly Car accessories as well as Dublin Port Company, Dublin Docklands Authority, The National YC, St. Patricks Rowing Club and the International 49er Class Association.

DSC_0322

Action on the Liffey. Photo: Harry Hermon

Published in Racing
DUBLIN PORT Dublin Bay Sailing Club Results for 26 AUGUST 2010

BENETEAU 31.7 - 1. Magic (D.O'Sullivan/D.Espey), 2. Prospect (Chris Johnston), 3. Thirty Something (Gerry Jones et al)

BENETEAU 31.7 Echo- 1. Prospect (Chris Johnston), 2. Magic (D.O'Sullivan/D.Espey), 3. Fiddly Bits (Kevin Byrne et al)

CRUISERS 0 Echo - 1. Tsunami (Vincent Farrell), 2. Lively Lady (Derek Martin), 3. WOW (George Sisk)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. WOW (George Sisk), 2. Tsunami (Vincent Farrell), 3. Lively Lady (Derek Martin)

CRUISERS 1 Echo - 1. Jalapeno (Dermod Baker et al), 2. Rollercoaster (C&P Power-Smith), 3. Raptor (D.Hewitt et al)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Jalapeno (Dermod Baker et al), 2. Joker 11 (John Maybury), 3. Rollercoaster (C&P Power-Smith)

CRUISERS 2 Echo - 1. Borraine (Ean Pugh), 2. Free Spirit (John O'Reilly), 3. Bendemeer (Gerald Kinsella)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. Red Rhum (J Nicholson), 2. Jawesome 11 (V.Kennedy/M.Dyke), 3. Peridot (Jim McCann et al)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Hard on Port (Flor O'Driscoll), 2. Supernova (K.Lawless et al), 3. Two Step (Ross Doyle)

CRUISERS 3 Echo - 1. Papytoo (M.Walsh/F.Guilfoyle), 2. Jabiru (M & S Renwick), 3. Vespucci (S & C O'Regan)

CRUISERS 4 - 1. Ghrazel (Charles Pearson), 2. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 3. Aslana (J.Martin/B.Mulkeen)

DRAGON - 1. Phantom (D.Williams/P.Bowring), 2. Zu (P.Dee et al), 3. Diva (R.Johnson/R.Goodbody)

FLYING FIFTEEN - 1. Fifty Somethings (David Mulvin), 2. Snow White (Frank Burgess), 3. Deranged (C.Doorly)

GLEN - 1. Glendun (B.Denham et al), 2. Glenmarissa (F.Elmes/W.Higgins), 3. Glenshesk (L.Faulkner et al)

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Cresendo (L Balfe), 2. Ruff Nuff (D & C Mitchell), 3. Ruffles (Michael Cutliffe)

SB3s - 1. Blue Bird (Cathy McAleavy), 2. Bad-Kilcullen (J.Dowling), 3. Alert Packaging (Justin Burke)

SHIPMAN - 1. Malindi (B.Smith/A.Gray), 2. Whiterock (Henry Robinson), 3. Therapi (Alan McCarthy et al)

SIGMA 33 - 1. White Mischief (Timothy Goodbody), 2. Rupert (R.Lovegrove/P.Varian), 3. Gwili Two (D.Clarke/P.Maguire)

SQUIB - 1. Why Not (Derek & Jean Jago), 2. Anemos (Pete & Ann Evans), 3. Chillax (Mary McLoughlin)

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS Echo - 1. Coumeenole (Bill Kavanagh), 2. Albireo (Michael Murphy), 3. Teal (Ian French)

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS - 1. Arwen (Philip O'Dwyer), 2. Calypso (Howard Knott), 3. Nauti-Gal (J & J Crawford)

Published in DBSC

State-of-the-art revolutionary rotor-ship E-Ship 1 docked in Dublin Port for the second time on 21 August after a voyage from Emden, Germany writes Jehan Ashmore.

The previous week the 'green' energy concept vessel completed the same route and notably on a maiden commercial voyage to Dublin. Onboard that inaugural voyage to the capital was a cargo of wind-turbines, tower parts and blades for the Castledockrell Wind Farm, currently under construction in Co Wexford.

The newbuild German vessel has four 25-metre high rotating cyclinder towers positioned fore and aft, that enable the vessel to harness wind energy. The rotors act as "sails" to assist propulsion of the 12,810 gross tonnes vessel and in which reduces fuel consumption significantly and lessens the impact of CO2 emissions.

The rotor technology is derived from a principle known as the Magnus Effect. This invention was further adapted in 1925 when the Fletter-Rotor ship set sail. The experimental voyage proved a success though not enough to convince the shipping industry as conventional engine plants remained efficient and the cost of fuel was low.

E-Ship 1's second port-call to Dublin was to deliver another consignment for the Co. Wexford based wind-farm project. The componants are manufactured by Enercon GmBH, the German company which also commissioned the E-Ship 1. The vessel incorporates many innovative designs derived from the wind-technology sector.

e1shipAugust

E-Ship 1 arriving from Emden on only the second call to Dublin Port on 21 August. Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Ports & Shipping
DUBLIN PORT Dublin Bay Sailing Club Results for 17 AUGUST 2010

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Indecision (Declan Hayes et al), 2. Powder Monkey (C.Moore/M.Byrne), 3. Something Else (J.Hall et al)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. Cor Baby (Keith Kiernan et al), 2. Borraine (Ean Pugh), 3. Red Rhum (J Nicholson)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Wynward (Wyn McCormack), 2. Chouskikou (R.Sheehan/R.Hickey), 3. Pamafe (Michael Costello)

CRUISERS 4 - 1. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 2. Aslana (J.Martin/B.Mulkeen), 3. Artemis (J.Giles)

FIREBALL - 1. Blind Squirrel (Frank Miller), 2. Goodness Gracious (Louise McKenna), 3. Elevation (N.Colin/M.Casey)

GLEN - 1. Pterodactyl (R & D McCaffrey), 2. Glenluce (D & R O'Connor), 3. Glenmarissa (F.Elmes/W.Higgins)

IDRA 14 FOOT - 1. Dart (Pierre Long), 2. Doody (J.Fitzgerald/J.Byrne), 3. Dunmoanin (Frank Hamilton)

MERMAID - 1. Jill (P.Smith/P.Mangan), 2. Kim (D Cassidy), 3. Oonagh (J&M Griffith)

PY CLASS - 1. Evan Dolan (), 2. Ross O'Leary (Laser), 3. Brian O'Hare (Laser 1)

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Diane ll (Bruce Carswell), 2. Alias (D.Meeke/M.McCarthy), 3. The Sting (Richard O'Keefe et al)

SIGMA 33 - 1. Pippa lV (G.Kinsman/K.Blake/M.O'Brien), 2. White Mischief (Timothy Goodbody), 3. September Song (Conor Colleary)

Published in DBSC
DUBLIN PORT Dublin Bay Sailing Club Results for 14 AUGUST 2010

CRUISERS 0 Echo- 1. Tsunami (Vincent Farrell), 2. Lively Lady (Derek Martin), 3. Tiamat (Tim Costello)

CRUISERS 0 - 1. Tsunami (Vincent Farrell), 2. WOW (George Sisk), 3. Tiamat (Tim Costello)

CRUISERS 1 Echo - 1. Indecision (Declan Hayes et al), 2. Jetstream (Peter Redden), 3. Something Else (J.Hall et al)

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Jalapeno (Dermod Baker et al), 2. Something Else (J.Hall et al), 3. Jetstream (Peter Redden)

CRUISERS 2 Echo - 1. Bendemeer (Gerald Kinsella), 2. Red Rhum (J Nicholson), 3. Jawesome 11 (V.Kennedy/M.Dyke)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. Jawesome 11 (V.Kennedy/M.Dyke), 2. Red Rhum (J Nicholson), 3. Peridot (Jim McCann et al)

CRUISERS 3 Echo - 1. Papytoo (M.Walsh/F.Guilfoyle), 2. Supernova (K.Lawless et al), 3. Jammie Dodger (J.H & D.O'Neill)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Supernova (K.Lawless et al), 2. Hard on Port (Flor O'Driscoll), 3. Two Step (Ross Doyle)

CRUISERS 4 - 1. Ghrazel (Charles Pearson), 2. Rascal (K.Burke/S.Milner), 3. Maranda (Myles Kelly)

DRAGON Race 4- 1. Diva (R.Johnson/R.Goodbody), 2. Phantom (D.Williams/P.Bowring), 3. Susele (Michael Halpenny)

DRAGON Race 1- 1. Phantom (D.Williams/P.Bowring), 2. Chiang (Iain Finnegan), 3. Diva (R.Johnson/R.Goodbody)

DRAGON Race 2- 1. Phantom (D.Williams/P.Bowring), 2. Diva (R.Johnson/R.Goodbody), 3. Chiang (Iain Finnegan)

DRAGON Race 3- 1. Phantom (D.Williams/P.Bowring), 2. Chiang (Iain Finnegan), 3. Susele (Michael Halpenny)

FLYING FIFTEEN Race 1- 1. Rollercoaster (Tom Murphy), 2. Deranged (C.Doorly), 3. Snow White (Frank Burgess)

FLYING FIFTEEN Race 2- 1. Rollercoaster (Tom Murphy), 2. Hy5ive (D & S Gorman), 3. Snow White (Frank Burgess)

MERMAID Race 1- 1. Jill (P.Smith/P.Mangan), 2. Kim (D Cassidy), 3. Oonagh (J&M Griffith)

MERMAID Race 2- 1. Kim (D Cassidy), 2. Jill (P.Smith/P.Mangan), 3. Aideen (B.Martin/D.Brennan)

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Diane ll (Bruce Carswell), 2. Paramour (Larry Power et al), 3. Alias (D.Meeke/M.McCarthy)

SHIPMAN - 1. Curraglas (John Masterson), 2. Therapi (Alan McCarthy et al), 3. Euphanzel lll (Louis McSherry et al)

SIGMA 33 - 1. White Mischief (Timothy Goodbody), 2. Gwili Two (D.Clarke/P.Maguire), 3. Rupert (R.Lovegrove/P.Varian)

SQUIB Race 1- 1. Ladybird (M.Muldoon/B.Stevens), 2. Kookaburra (P & M Dee), 3. Little Demon (Marie Dee)

SQUIB Race 2- 1. Nimble (Brian O'Hare), 2. Why Not (Derek & Jean Jago), 3. Ladybird (M.Muldoon/B.Stevens)

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS Echo - 1. Lucy O (Aonghus O hEocha), 2. Finnegans Wake (T.Rowlands et al), 3. Calypso (Howard Knott)

WHITE SAIL CRUISERS - 1. Arwen (Philip O'Dwyer), 2. Act Two (Michael O'Leary et al), 3. Calypso (Howard Knott)

Published in DBSC
DUBLIN PORT Dublin Bay Sailing Club Results for 10 AUGUST 2010

CRUISERS 1 - 1. Indecision (Declan Hayes et al), 2. Powder Monkey (C.Moore/M.Byrne)

CRUISERS 2 - 1. Cor Baby (Keith Kiernan et al), 2. Borraine (Ean Pugh), 3. Red Rhum (J Nicholson)

CRUISERS 3 - 1. Papytoo (M.Walsh/F.Guilfoyle), 2. Rattler 2 (Austin Whelan), 3. Pamafe (Michael Costello)

CRUISERS 4 - 1. Ghrazel (Charles Pearson), 2. Maranda (Myles Kelly), 3. Aslana (J.Martin/B.Mulkeen)

FIREBALL - 1. Licence to Thrill (Louis Smyth), 2. Weather (E.Butler/O.Laverty), 3. Elevation (N.Colin/M.Casey)

GLEN - 1. Glenluce (D & R O'Connor), 2. Glenmarissa (F.Elmes/W.Higgins), 3. Glenshesk (L.Faulkner et al)

IDRA 14 FOOT - 1. Sapphire (Lorcan O'Sullivan), 2. Dunmoanin (Frank Hamilton), 3. Dart (Pierre Long)

MERMAID - 1. Jill (P.Smith/P.Mangan), 2. Oonagh (J&M Griffith), 3. Kim (D Cassidy)

PY CLASS - 1. Ross O'Leary (Laser), 2. Brian O'Hare (Laser 1), 3. James Dowling (Laser 1)

RUFFIAN 23 - 1. Alias (D.Meeke/M.McCarthy), 2. Diane ll (Bruce Carswell), 3. Golden Girl (Michael Carrigan et al)

SHIPMAN - 1. Bluefin (B.Finucane et al), 2. Euphanzel lll (Louis McSherry et al)

SIGMA 33 - 1. White Mischief (Timothy Goodbody), 2. Rupert (R.Lovegrove/P.Varian), 3. Pippa lV (G.Kinsman/K.Blake/M.O'Brien)

SQUIB - 1. Periguin (N.Coakley/J.Redahan), 2. Tais (Michael O'Connell)

Published in DBSC

A revolutionary newbuild multi-purpose cargo vessel, E-Ship 1, docked at Dublin port for the first time today writes Jehan Ashmore. The vessel had arrived from Emden, Germany with a cargo of wind-turbines bound for a project in Leinster.

At both the fore and aft of the new vessel stands a pair of giant metal circular towers which gives the ship a highly distinctive profile. Each of the four rotor tower "sails" are 25 metres high and four metres wide and these towers are driven by electro-motors which together with the wind harness wind energy to provide thrust for the 12,810 gross tonnes vessel. The ship does retain a conventional engine plant below deck and a streamlined superstructure and sleek hull to
reduce drag.

With all these innovative features, E-Ship 1 derives its project name from the enviromental ethos of her owners, Enercon, one of the leading manufacturers of wind-turbine technolgy. The newbuild is also termed the "Turbo-Sail Freighter" which apart from using wind energy to cut down fuel costs and measures to reduce emissions, there is also a double hull to lessen pollution from oil pollution incidents.

The origins for the concept of the E-Ship 1 is not new. In 1852 the Magnus Effect was invented and is named after the works of German physicist, Heinrich Gustav Magnus. The Magnus effect is a force acting on a spinning body in a moving airstream, which acts perpendicularly to the direction of the airstream; in essence when applied to ships, propels the vessel forward.

Another, German, the engineer, Anton Flettner adapted the concept in 1925 with the first rotor vessel, Buckau, a former schooner that was refitted with rotors driven by an electric propulsion system. On several North Sea voyages, the rotors performed well, despite stormy seas, though the technology was not deemed successful enough as the conventional engines were still more efficient and with the low fuel costs remained cheaper to operate.

With the threat of global warming, times have changed dramatically and the need for the concept of the Flettner's rotor-sailing ship has come full-circle with the launch of E-Ship 1 in 2008. Using the latest technology developed for E-Ship 1, Enercon carried out extensive sea-trials last year and first sailed commercially this year.

E-Ship 1 was firstly built at the German shipbuilder Lindenau-Werft, but the yard was declared insolvency. This led to the newbuild to be towed in January 2009 to and completed by the Cassens Werft in Emden.

Enercon was founded in 1984 and has since installed over 16,000 wind turbines in over 30 countries. The specially designed ship will be able to continue transporting wind turbines and components worldwide in addition to heavy lift-cargoes, containers and dry cargoes. The E Ship 1 is due to depart Dublin on Wednesday.

Stern

(Below) The revolutionary rotor-sail, wind energy concept newbuild, E-Ship 1 at Dublin on 10 August and (Above) Stern-view of E-Ship 1 with aft-rotor sails and stern-ramp Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

revo1

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

In a highly unusual procedure, a tanker took on bunkers (loading of fuel) while anchored in Dublin Bay. The procedure took place on 2 August when the Whitstar (2,159gt) moored alongside the larger Pembroke Fisher (9,356gt) writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Whitstar had arrived from Dover to conduct bunkering. The vessel approached the Pembroke Fisher to tie mooring ropes amidships, fore and aft.

The bunkering took several hours to complete. With bunkering complete, the Whitstar proceeded to the Clyde. Incidently, a fleetmate of Whitstar, the Whitchampion arrived at Dublin port earlier during the summer to load bunkers for a large cruiseship. While the re-fueled Pembroke Fisher returned to anchor overnight off Dalkey Island.

Prior to the bunkering operation, Pembroke Fisher had spent several days at anchorage south of Dalkey Island after discharging petroleum products at Dublin Port.

It is also unusual for commercial shipping to take anchorage off Dalkey Island while close to Killiney Bay. Otherwise, it is the norm for vessels to anchor in Dublin Bay with the majority of ships taking anchorage south-east off Dun Laoghaire.

The next day, Pembroke Fisher weighed anchor and firstly set a course for the Kish Lighthouse and then altered to proceed south down the Irish Sea bound for Milford Haven. The Welsh port is the location of one of the largest oil refineraries in the UK.

bunker

Whitstar moored alongside Pembroke Fisher on 2 August. The smaller tanker was transferring bunkers in a rare operation in Dublin Bay. Photo: Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Dublin Bay

A ship's pass dated 1687, signed by King James II and Samuel Pepys, which was acquired by the Dublin Port & Docks board in 1924, was presented to the National Library of Ireland today by Enda Connellan, CEO, Dublin Port Company who noted that "Dublin Port Company is delighted to present this interesting and rare historical document to the National Library of Ireland. This will ensure that it is appropriately conserved and displayed. In its new home it will also be more accessible to the public."

The pass is one of the few known examples of 17th century ships' passes in the world, with others held at the National Archives in Kew, London and at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

The example presented to the National Library of Ireland was designed to provide passage for the merchant vessel the Mary of Cork, free from interference by English warships or warships belonging to states maintaining diplomatic relations with England.

The vessel left Dublin port in late 1687, bound for the Canary Islands. At the time, the Canary Islands were major exporters of sugar and Malvasia, a fortified white wine which travelled well and was extremely popular in Britain. The Mary of Cork may have been trading in such foodstuffs, in return for products such as salted Irish beef.

The vessel was manned by a crew of five and captained by Zachary Peebuchet.

The Mary of Cork ship's pass was issued at the Court of Whitehall on 29 September 1687 and was signed by King James II (Lord High Admiral 1685-1688) and Samuel Pepys (in his capacity as Secretary to the Admiralty). On 18 April 1688, the ship's pass was returned to Ireland, where it was entered into the registry of the High Court of Admiralty of Ireland by Thomas Williamson. It was acquired by the Dublin Port & Docks Board in 1924, and will soon be on display in the National Library's Department of Manuscripts.

Published in Dublin Bay

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port (today) on 4th August, The World, the first ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.

 

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port on 4th August, The World,
the first and only ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the
capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept in
that passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of staying
onboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury private
penthouse suites.
There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. The
luxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,
complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom and
verandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any one
time, varies between 150-200 people.
As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any private
community, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that are
available for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting a
residence from a selection of units.
Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,
delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimming
pools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deck
there is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authentic
grass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck and
plonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within
96 hours.
The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is docked
close to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestrians
alike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7
August).
Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the Point
Village provides an excellent venue to take views of The World and
Dublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early on
Sunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11
August).
The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,
made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during those
heady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over
3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.
The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continous
cruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Kloster
junior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended to
order a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled down
due to customer demand.
In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.
After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010
devoted to exploring Antartica.

The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept inthat passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of stayingonboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury privatepenthouse suites.

There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. Theluxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom andverandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any onetime, varies between 150-200 people.

As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any privatecommunity, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that areavailable for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting aresidence from a selection of units.

Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimmingpools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deckthere is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authenticgrass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck andplonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within96 hours.

The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is dockedclose to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestriansalike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7August).

Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the PointVillage provides an excellent venue to take views of The World andDublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early onSunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11August).

The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during thoseheady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.

The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continouscruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Klosterjunior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended toorder a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled downdue to customer demand.

In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010devoted to exploring Antartica.

 

The_World_moored_alongside_North_Wall_Quay_Extension__Dublin._Photo_Jehan_Ashmore-ShipSNAPS_4

The World moored alongside North Wall Quay Extension,  Dublin. Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 47 of 48

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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