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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Baths

Progress on the redevelopment of the Dun Laoghaire Baths site on Dublin Bay continues apace with part of the newly-built pier and jetty now clearly visible in the Scotsman's Bay area at the back of the East Pier.

When finished the jetty will provide access to the water's edge for swimmers and landing points for canoes, kayaks and other water sports equipment. The new pier will extend approximately 15m beyond the end of an existing concrete feature permitting swimmers to enter deep water clear of the rocks at low tide. 

A newly commissioned statue of local former Sandycove resident and Irish nationalist Roger Casement will be sited at the end of the new pier. 

the baths dun laoghaireThe new baths development for Dun Laoghaire showing the new swim jetty

As Afloat.ie previously reported, the new Dún Laoghaire Baths, which has been designed by DLR Architects' Department, will see a new public café linked to an outdoor terrace with views over the Bay, along with studio workspaces for artists and new lifeguard facilities. New public toilet facilities at street level will be fully accessible for the mobility impaired.

casement statueThe new Roger Casement statue destined for a plinth at the end of the swim jetty

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#dublinbay - Rock armour delivered for the Dun Laoghaire Baths redevelopment project, has been completed, though further work on the foreshore is underway to position boulders into place, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Around 4,300 tonnes of granite which was transported by barge from Falmouth, in the UK, is to be used to provide coastal protection from erosion at the site and associated newly built jetty on Scotsman's Bay.

Coastal works involved the barge Selina which self-discharged the rocks onto the foreshore, while under the assistance of tugs Husky and MTS Indus. Originally the delivery of rocks to the site along Newtownsmith was to have taken a fortnight, however weather conditions hampered such efforts.

Barge selina rock ArmourMaking a splash - The Barge Selina deposits rock armour in Scotsman's Bay. Photo: Afloat.ie

The final load of boulders was taken from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to the neighbouring bay and on Thursday, MTS Indus towed the barge back to the Cornish port.

The jetty jutting into Scotsman's Bay at the €10m baths project developed by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, involves heavy machinery putting into place the rock armour by forming in layers. As for those lower and inner layers, they will be constructed using locally sourced granite of smaller rock sizes.

In total there is approximately 6,000 tonnes of rock armour being placed.

The public amenity will have changing areas that will provide access to the water's edge for swimmers and at the jetty, landing points for canoes, kayaks and other water sports equipment.

For further details click here on the overall project built by SIAC Construction which is due to be completed in Spring 2020.

Published in Dublin Bay

#DublinBay - The rock armour used at the site of the Dun Laoghaire Baths redevelopment project costing €10 million, can each weigh up to 6 tonnes, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Works on the coastal site between Dun Laoghaire Harbour's East Pier and Newtownsmith, began 10 days ago though since then bad weather has hampered in the dumping of the rocks.

Where times have been favourable, tugs have towed the 6,000 tonne barge, Selina, from the harbour around into Scotsmans Bay where a trio of grab excavators on board dump the rocks on to the foreshore. At this location is where the old baths site has lain derelict for more than two decades.

The boulders are then repositoned into place to act as rock armour so that the new jetty also for use by small craft in the baths project, will be protected from coastal erosion.

The public amenity is a project of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, which is to transform the seafront and reinvent the area as a destination for swimmers and sports enthusiasts and draw visitors from far and wide to the borough.

In the meantime, such sea based operations of the project to install the rock armour, have involved the MTS Indus of UK based Marine & Towage Services Ltd of Brixham, Devon. In addition the services of Husky belonging to Wicklow Port based Alpha Marine which has been retained during the sea defence process.

MTS Indus is a single-screw multi-purpose tug with a bollard pull of 24 tonnes, that was also responsible in towing the Selina to Dun Laoghaire last month. On arrival to the harbour, the barge laden with rock armour from Falmouth, Cornwall, berthed at St. Michaels Pier, which has since acted as base in between works carried out subject to weather and tidal conditions.

When Selina has been towed outside the harbour by MTS Indus this is where Husky, a twin-screw, tug/workboat with advantage of a shallow draft has operated in close proximity of the foreshore (as shown in the photo above). The tug remains alongside the barge to hold into position to enable more accurate disposal of rocks grabbed by the excavators into the water. 

The Belfast registered tug has undertaken many projects elsewhere, among them in the UK at Shoreham Harbour for a windfarm project of the Sussex coast as Alfoat reported last year.

As for the Irish project's additional facilities, they are to include a cafe and studio work spaces for artists. These features in the overall project that has been designed in house by DLRCoCo own architectural department.

The contract for the project from the council was awarded in a joint venture between SIAC Construction and Mantovani Group and is scheduled for completion in Spring 2020.

Published in Dublin Bay

#DublinBay - Works on the redeveloped Dun Laoghaire Baths project at Newtownsmith reached a significant milestone given the arrival this morning by sea of the first load of rock armour to protect a newly built jetty, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As Afloat previously reported a consignment of huge granite boulders arrived last month into Dun Laoghaire Harbour by barge since identified as the Selina. The rock armour loaded in Falmouth, Cornwall, has remained in the Irish port for almost a fortnight but is now ready to be installed to protect the new Scotsman's Bay jetty quay from erosion. 

The jetty forms part of the Dun Laoghaire Baths site and is Dublin Bay's newest quay for swimming and fishing.  In addition, the facility is also intended to be an embarkation point for small boats and canoes setting off into Scotsman's Bay, located between the harbour's East Pier and Sandycove. The public amenity project for Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council was contracted to SIAC Construction, while the design was carried out by DLR's Architects' Department, which will see a new public café linked to an outdoor terrace with views over both bays, along with studio workspaces for artists and new lifeguard facilities. 

At 84m long Selina and with a beam of 20m the barge was towed by Wicklow based Alphamarine's Husky at the stern while Brixham based Marine & Towage Services MTS Indus took charge at the bow. In addition, prior to departing Dun Laoghaire Harbour, a pilot from Dublin Port Company cutter Liffey embarked to assist operations that saw the flotilla round the East Pier into Scotsman's Bay where the workboats are in close proximity of the rocky coastline. 

Barge Scotsmans bayTugs Husky and MTS Indus with barge Selina offload rock armour in Scotsmans bay Photo: Afloat.ie

According to Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council, the rock armour will be stockpiled adjacent to the new jetty until it is ready to be placed into a more precise allocation. This will require off-loading of the barge by using several diggers on board, however, the operation only be carried out typically during a 3 to 4-hour window at high tide level. The operation may take between 3 to 4 high tide cycles before the work is completed to surround the jetty that is weather permitting expected to take a fortnight to complete.

DLRCoCo added during the rock armour process, there may be increased noise levels in the off-loading operations and that they apologised for any inconvenience this may cause.

Published in Dublin Bay

As sea works continue apace at the old Baths site at Dun Laoghaire, the new jetty to provide access to the water’s edge for swimmers and landing points for kayaks, canoes and stand-up paddleboards is clearly taking shape on the South Dublin shoreline, as our photo above illustrates.

As Afloat.ie has previously reported, the works are part of a redevelopment of the old baths that had been left in a state of dereliction by the council for over 20 years.

When finished the new pier will offer a much-needed point of access to Dublin Bay for small boats and canoes and sea swimmers.

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Work continues apace for new boating facilities on Dublin Bay at the old Dun Laoghaire Baths site in Sandycove.

Over the next couple of months, the final elements of the pier construction will be installed, including caisson units (which look like large hollow bricks) along each side of the pier foundation.

As Afloat.ie has previously reported, the works are part of a redevelopment of the old baths that had been left in a state of dereliction by the council for over 20 years.

When finished the new pier will offer a much-needed point of access to Dublin Bay for small boats and canoes and sea swimmers.

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Marine works continue at the new Dún Laoghaire Baths site, where the old baths buildings have now either been completely demolished or retained for the next stage of the project that will ultimately see a new public café linked to an outdoor terrace with views over the Bay.

Dun Laoghaire County Council also say there will be studio workspaces for artists and new lifeguard facilities. It's hard to see progress from seaward with new hoardings erected recently but Afloat.ie's landward photo (above) shows off the extent of works to date.

As Afloat.ie reported previously, new public toilet facilities at street level will be fully accessible and a new jetty and changing areas will provide access to the water's edge for swimmers and landing points for canoes, kayaks and other water sports equipment.

Baths Dun Laoghaire(Above) The derelict Baths site at Dun Laoghaire before works commenced and below an artist's impression of the finished job

baths artist impression

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Work is underway at Dún Laoghaire on the €9 million redevelopment of the old Dún Laoghaire Baths site that has been derelict for nearly 30 years.

A contract with SIAC-Mantovani has seen part of the old baths buildings demolished before new facilities are installed including a jetty and other maritime works to increase marine leisure facilities on the east coast.

As Afloat.ie reported previously, the approved plans will see the retention of the existing baths building and include a new pedestrian walkway between the promenade at Newtownsmith and the rear of the East Pier. Proposed new amenities include a small café, public toilets, an artist space, upgrading of the existing maritime gardens and a new jetty for access to the sea for kayaks, canoes and small craft.

Welcoming the redevelopment of the seafront, the Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council, Cllr. Tom Murphy (FF) said “this investment will see a rebirth of the area between the East Pier and Newtownsmith, which has been derelict since the old baths closed in 1997.”

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Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council has signed a €9 million contract with SIAC-Mantovani for the redevelopment of the old Dún Laoghaire Baths site.

As Afloat.ie reported previously, the approved plans will see the retention of the existing baths building and include a new pedestrian walkway between the promenade at Newtownsmith and the rear of the East Pier. Proposed new amenities include a small café, public toilets, an artist space, up-grading of the existing maritime gardens and a new jetty for access to the sea for kayaks, canoes and small craft.

Welcoming the redevelopment of the seafront, the Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council, Cllr. Tom Murphy (FF) said “this investment will see a rebirth of the area between the East Pier and Newtownsmith, which has been derelict since the old baths closed in 1997.”

Cormac Devlin, who is a councillor for the area, welcomed the investment in Dún Laoghaire Town saying, “it has been a very long road, the Baths and the Rainbow Rapids closed in 1997 and in the interim several plans have come and gone. They proved unacceptable due to their high-rise nature and unsuitability to the site. This proposal is in keeping with the low-rise built environment surrounding the site and ensures that the site remains in public ownership.”

The Baths were first constructed in 1843, the baths were completely redeveloped by the then Kingstown Town Council in 1910 and operated until 1997 when they were closed.

In March 2010, a report was brought before Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council setting out the rationale for the redevelopment of the old Dún Laoghaire Baths site. Councillors agreed the future parameters of development on the site, which included securing the baths pavilion, removing dilapidated structures, enhancing the connection between Newtownsmith and the East Pier and ensuring access to the water’s edge.

The Council made a formal application for a Foreshore Licence to the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government in December 2012. Approval in principle was granted by the Department and Council approval given in March 2015 following a successful public consultation process. In the summer of 2017, the Council erected several information boards on the facade of the prominent Baths building to inform the public of the approved plans for the site.

However the project was delayed when exploratory engineering works found that part of the site formed a retaining wall for Queens Road. This resulted in a significant increase in the estimated cost of the project. In March this year, the Council agreed to fund the renovation as part of an overall €10.3 investment as part of their Capital Programme.

Councillor Devlin acknowledged that a lot of people would have liked to have seen the retention of a public swimming facility on the site, however the proposal includes provision for a jetty which will provide access into the bay.

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The derelict baths site at Dun Laoghaire will be developed following a vote by Councillors to proceed with plans first outlined by Afloat.ie back in April. 

The €2.5 million project was given the green light by the Department of the Environment.

The revised plans will see the baths – last used 20 years ago as the Rainbow Rapids – developed into artists' studios with a gallery and café space.

Among other changes, the old saltwater pool space will be filled in to create a green space between the People's Park and the East Pier.

Published in Dublin Bay
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The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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