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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race

Conor Doyle's Freya, the racing yacht at the centre of a kitesurfer rescue undertaken during the first hours of the  Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race on Wednesday has been granted redress, a decision that gives Doyle and his Kinsale Yacht Club crew second overall in the 2021 edition of the prestigious Irish offshore sailing fixture. 

The Xp50 yacht, the largest in the 38-boat fleet, was the first to finish in Dingle early on Friday morning but was scored fifth on IRC rating due to the time delay involved in completing the rescue off the County Wicklow coast.

Doyle filed for redress as required under racing rules of sailing and this afternoon the race protest committee found the following facts: on 9th June Freya was beating southwards along the Wicklow shore against a tide flowing northwards at approximately 2 knots.

At approx.19.20 on port tack sailing towards the shore, Freya saw a semi-inflated kite in the water, further out to sea at a distance of 0.5 N,M. She tacked to investigate. At 19.30 the crew identified a kite surfer in the water in need of assistance. Freya's position was N 52 51.671, W 06 02.610. A video of the incident is posted on Afloat here.

Freya started her motor, lowered sails and requested RNLI assistance via Rosslare radio.

At 19.45 the casualty was taken on board and Freya motored in a Southerly direction to rendezvous with the Arklow lifeboat.

The kitesurfer casualty is taken on board FreyaThe kitesurfer casualty is taken on board Freya

At 19.50 Freya informed the race office of the incident.

Freya transferred the casualty to the lifeboat at 20.12 and then motored northwards until resumed racing at 20.21. Her position at this moment was N52 51.581 W 06 02.553, less than 200m south of the position where they stopped racing.

Freya transfers the casualty to the Arklow lifeboat Photo: Chris Power Smith/AureliaFreya transfers the casualty to the Arklow lifeboat Photo: Chris Power Smith/Aurelia

The protest committee found that Freya's overall strategy was not significantly modified by the time lost in the rescue.

In conclusion, the committee granted redress and said Freya's elapsed time was made significantly worse through no fault of her own by giving help as required by RRS 1.1.

The Protest Committee evaluated that the total time lost was approx.75 minutes. However, it decided the fairest arrangement for all boats affected is to give Freya joint second place.

Download the full case document below

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

It is a well-established principle of the sea that help must be extended to those in distress, a principle that is espoused in Rule 1 of the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS):

SAFETY 1.1 Helping Those in Danger. A boat, competitor or support person shall give all possible help to any person or vessel in danger.

When a competitor suspends racing or diverts to help they put their own position in the race in jeopardy and so the RRS allows them to claim redress based on the time spent away from their course to the next mark.

Thus Freya, who stopped racing in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race last night to rescue a kite-surfer off the Wicklow coast just south of Brittas Bay on Wednesday evening, spending the best part of an hour doing so, will probably file a redress request for the time lost through giving help.

Freya stopped racing in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race last night to rescue a kite-surfer off the Wicklow coastFreya stopped racing in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race last night to rescue a kite-surfer off the Wicklow coast Photo: Chris Power Smith/Aurelia

The organisers will convene a jury to consider the request, and if found valid will most likely adjust Freya's elapsed time to compensate for her time spent on the rescue.

While the tracker will form a key part of the evidence used to determine time lost, the calculation is complicated by the need to take the tide, the search area and any other movement during this time. As Freya is close to the leading group, it may well be that redress, if awarded, will have impact on the podium positions.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #1 7 pm The largest yacht in the Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race has temporarily suspended racing this evening to rescue a kitesurfer off the off Wicklow Coast.

The 14th edition of the 280-mile offshore fixture started at 2 pm today off Dun Laoghaire Harbour and is organised by the National Yacht Club.

Ian Travers a crewman on Conor Doyle's XP50 Freya called the Race Office this evening to say the Kinsale entry 'has temporarily suspended racing in order to rescue a kite surfer.'

Travers told NYC organisers that "All ok and coastguard informed".

The plan is for Freya to transfer the casualty, who is safe and well to the Arklow lifeboat and then resume racing.

Freya prepares to transfer the Kitesurfer to Arklow RNLI Photo: Chris Power Smith/AureliaFreya prepares to transfer the Kitesurfer to Arklow RNLI Photo: Chris Power Smith/Aurelia

Wicklow
Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Day #1 4 pm: The first retiral from the Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race is the First 40 Prima Forte that has retired into Killiney Bay just two hours after the start.

The 14th edition of the 280-mile offshore fixture started at 2 pm off Dun Laoghaire Harbour and is organised by the National Yacht Club.

The former British Commodores Cupper, skippered by Sean Lemass, was among the leading bunch immediately after this afternoon's start as Afloat reports here but retired shortly after leaving Dublin Bay with halyard issues.

 

 

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown Cathaoirleach Councillor Una Power visited the National Yacht Club tonight on the eve of the 2021 Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race to wish competitors fair winds for Wednesday's 280-mile race.

The biennial D2D Race – now in its 14th edition – has a great history and a valued place in the NYC Club calendar as a major event that the NYC owns and manages.

In recent years, the race has also become a Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) event and expanded further.

This year the entry is limited, for Covid reasons, to yachts from the Island of Ireland - but even still the entry is strong – at 38 boats. The story of the race was covered on Saturday by Afloat's WM Nixon here.

The race starts at Dun Laoghaire Harbour at 2 pm on Wednesday, June 9th.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

Runner up in the 2019 edition, Royal St. George Yacht Club's Aurelia, skippered by Chris and Patanne Power Smith returns to the Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race startline with unfinished business.

This J/122 is a regular top performer in Irish offshore fixtures such as ISORA and Wicklow's Round Ireland Race, where the RStGYC crew posted third overall in the 2018 700-mile race

Aurelia, a name that translates from Latin as 'The Golden One', is the only J122 in the 2021 D2D fleet. 

A keen J Boat exponent, Aurelia is Power Smith's sixth J Boat. The self-taught Dun Laoghaire Harbour skipper has also previously raced a J24 and then through, a J92, J92S, two J109s, Jetstream and the very successfully campaigned Rollercoaster in which we won two Dublin Bay Championships. He spoke previously about his sailing to Afloat here.

Chris Power Smith, skipper of J/122 AureliaChris Power Smith, skipper of J/122 Aurelia

Power Smith returns to the start line for the 14th edition as a front runner, having already clocked up some early season training practice in both of May's ISORA training race days. 

Brendan Coghlan's Sunfast 3600, YoyoBrendan Coghlan's Sunfast 3600, Yoyo

Aurelia is one of three Royal St. George entries into Wednesday's race. 

Brendan Coghlan's Sunfast 3600 Yoyo is one of three of the French types racing to Dingle and Ian Bowring is racing again in his Sigma 33, Springer.

RStGYC Yachts in the Dun Laoghaire Dingle Race

  • Aurelia J122, IRL 35950, Skipper: Patanne & Chris Power Smith, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.075
  • Springer Sigma33, OOD IRL 4464, Skipper: Ian Bowring, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 0.915
  • YOYO Jeanneau Sunfast 3600, 3618 Skipper: Brendan Coghlan, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.036
Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

As well as the defending champion, Dun Laoghaire's Royal Irish Yacht Club will have three other yachts in Wednesday's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race.

The 14th edition of the 280-mile offshore fixture starts at 2 pm off Dun Laoghaire Harbour and is organised by the National Yacht Club.

Paul O'Higgins will defend his D2D crown in the JPK 10.80 Rockabill VI and aim to make it three in a row for the RIYC after previous Rockabill VI victories in 2017 and 2019

The champion is joined by some potent RIYC clubmates; Andrew Algeo's J99 Juggerknot II, the Beneteau First 40 Prima Forte as well as George Sisk's Xp 44, WOW. 

Patrick Burke and Sean Lemass's First 40, Prima FortePatrick Burke and Sean Lemass's First 40, Prima Forte

Patrick Burke and Sean Lemass's First 40 arrived in Dublin Bay in January last year and in her first season won DBSC's best performing new yacht award.  As regular Afloat readers will know, this all-round performer was previously named La Response, and before that formerly known as Courier Zen and a veteran of several Commodore's Cup teams under former owner Andrew McIrvine, an ex Admiral and Commodore of the Royal Ocean Racing Club.

Andrew Algeo's J99 Juggerknot IIAndrew Algeo's J99 Juggerknot II

Algeo's Juggerknot II crew, who finished eighth in the 2019 race, is joined for this edition by Figaro campaigner Kenny Rumball. 

George Sisk’s Xp 44 WowGeorge Sisk’s Xp 44 Wow

George Sisk’s Xp 44 “Wow” was the 2019 Sovereign’s Cup winner in the coastal class, having delivered a hat-trick of wins and beating bigger sistership the Xp 50 Freya on her home waters off Kinsale in the Regatta’s Coastal Class but was scored as 'did not finish' in that year's D2D.

A fourth Royal Irish boat, Barry Cunningham's Sun Odyssey 490, ConQuestador is contesting the IRC Cruiser class.

Royal Irish Yachts in the 2021 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race

  • ConQuestador Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 490, IRL4900, Skipper: Barry Cunningham, Class: IRC Cruiser, Rating: 1.079
  • Juggerknot II J/99, IRL 3990, Skipper: Andrew Algeo, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.011
  • Rockabill VI JPK 10.80, IRL 10800, Skipper: Paul O'Higgins, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.05
  • WOW X-Yachts Xp44, IRLl4419, Skipper: George Sisk, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.124
  • Prima Forte Beneteau, IRL4240, Skipper: Sean Lemass, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.078
Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

The National Yacht Club's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race which starts on Wednesday, 9th June should go some way this season to compensating two Belfast Lough boats for the cancellation of the Bangor Town Regatta.

The IMX 38 eXcession, under the triple ownership of John Harrington, Ruan O'Tiarnaigh and Jonathan Mullholland, representing Royal Ulster, Ballyholme and Sutton Dinghy Club will start in the IRC Racing division.

Shaun Douglas's Beneteau 40.7 is entered under Ballyholme YC and Cockle Island BC. It is probably the first time the small Groomsport based club (CIBC) has had a representative in such a prestigious race. She will join eXcession in the IRC Racing division.

eXcession last raced in Dublin Bay in 2020 when she became the first Northern Ireland yacht to compete in ISORA racing in many years. So enthusiastic were the crew that after a fast turnaround they headed back North to race in Belfast Lough on the Sunday. No doubt the trio will be hoping to better the third in ISORA's IRC Class One last year.

John will deliver eXcession with Jonathan Mulholland, and Lough Neagh Sailing Club's Jim Tennyson and the return from Dingle will be skippered by David and Laura Anderson of Ballyholme, giving some of the less experienced crew some sea miles with hops along the South Coast.

For the big race, the crew will be John Harrington – Helm, Ruan O'Tiarnaigh - Skipper/helm, Ken Sharp - pit man and keyboards, John O'Connor – mastman, Jim Tennyson – trimmer, Stuart Ogg – foredeck, Robson Ogg – foredeck, Greg Bell – trimmer, Stephen Boyle - main sheet trimmer, John Bourke - trimmer/helm and Charlotte O'Tiarnaigh – trimmer.

After this event, John looks forward to the Strangford Narrows Series and then ISORA races out of Dublin. John and his crew are excited about the race to Dingle; "The crew are very much looking forward the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle race. Adam Winkelmann and Olivier Prouveur and the National Yacht Club have done sterling work steering the event and the preparations through the challenges of Covid.  We feel very privileged to be able to enjoy our sport during this difficult time and we greatly appreciate the work of the officers, volunteers and fellow competitors that make it possible."

The other Northern yacht is Shaun Douglas's First 40.7 from Ballyholme and Cockle Island which has Michael Ennis of Strangford Lough YC and Colin Coffey from Belfast Lough as the movers and shakers. He says "I am keen to put something back into sailing so on the team for d2d are two
young lads in their early twenties – both Jody Thallon and Josh Coffey will learn a lot on this race".

Game Changer - a good show in Royal Ulster's inaugural race to Portaferry on Strangford Lough earlier this seasonGame Changer - a good show in Royal Ulster's inaugural race to Portaferry on Strangford Lough earlier this season

Shaun bought Game Changer less than a year ago; "When I was looking for a boat, this was the type of event I had in mind. So after this, we will race in the Round the Isle of Man event, West Highland Week, then the Irish Cruising Racing Association National Championships in early September". But before all that Shaun plans to have Game Changer back in Bangor for Royal Ulster's Ailsa Craig race at the end of June.

GameChanger is in good form having put up a good show in Royal Ulster's inaugural race to Portaferry on Strangford Lough when Douglas topped the IRC fleet.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

"It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future". Yogi Berra.

Long-range forecasts from numerous sites are being pored over avidly by crews competing in this year's Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race commencing next Wednesday, June 9th at 1400. The general consensus seems to indicate that the 38-boat fleet (as previewed by WM Nixon here) will encounter 10 to 20-knot southerly veering southwesterly winds over the first 48 hours.

At this stage, there is potentially a temporary veering on Thursday along the south coast that could benefit the larger yachts, but only for a short period as the indication is for lighter winds on the Cork and Kerry coasts. If the winds blow as predicted there is a real chance that the entire race will be a two-sailer for a large portion of the fleet, with nothing abaft the beam currently in the forecast until early on Saturday morning.

"There is a real chance that the entire race will be a two-sailer for a large portion of the fleet"

It is hard to tell how this will impact the fleet - perhaps it will disadvantage the boats that are rigged for asymmetric sailing as there are currently unlikely to be favourable reaching angles. Perhaps the most telling factor might be the tide, particularly as the start time, two hours after high water, means that the big boats are unlikely to round the Tuskar before the second flood, perhaps giving an advantage to the lower-rated boats. It does mean that there will be rock-dodging activity along the Wexford coast in the twilight hours of Wednesday evening as the fleet seeks to avoid the stronger flood offshore.

So at this stage, there seems to be no great rating advantage due to the weather.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

It's no surprise that as hosts of this Wednesday's  2021 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race, the National Yacht Club is also fielding the biggest number of boats from the participating 19 yacht clubs but what's perhaps less well known is the extent of involvement of the NYC's Under 30 section who occupy key roles on other boats in the fleet too and also in its biennial race management team.

Will Byrne (27): XP50 ‘Freya’ - Bow

As a previous IRC and Line Honours winner of the D2D with Rockabill in 2017, Will (pictured top) has a lot to prove after an unsuccessful 2019 campaign onboard XP44 WOW.

Will resumes bowman duties offshore on the Kinsale Yacht Club entry by taking a break from his usual role as boat captain and helm onboard Gringo in Dublin Bay.

Will's experience includes class wins in the Caribbean600, Fast40+ Class, IRC events across Europe as well as experience working with professional race teams around the world.

Gráinne RyanGráinne Ryan

Gráinne Ryan (24): Race Committee

As a keen sailor who is a member of both the National Yacht Club and the Royal Dee Yacht Club Grainne is actively involved in the race management of ISORA. She also sat on the executive committee of the VDLR in the role of sustainability manager in 2019. In Dingle this year, Grainne is responsible for tracker management and compiling the results.

Saoirse ReynoldsSaoirse Reynolds

Saoirse Reynolds (23) Benetau Figaro3 ‘Raw’

Following an injury forcing her to stop other sports back in 2015, Saoirse began keelboat racing and has since clocked up a few thousand miles offshore in ISORA, deliveries, sail training and races such as the Rolex Fastnet Race. Racing a broad variety of boats including the J97 “Windjammer” and 3600 “YOYO”, she is able to race any position in any conditions.

Saoirse regularly sails on Chris Power Smiths successful J122 “Aurelia” but will be getting her first taste of foiling on Conor Fogerty’s Beneteau Figaro 3 “Raw” for this year's edition of the race. Saoirse is a mentee of the Magenta Project, being mentored by short-handed sailor Deb Fish.

Nicole Hemeryck is sailing on the Grand Soleil 31, JustTinaNicole Hemeryck is sailing on the Grand Soleil 31, JustTina Photo: Afloat

Nicole Hemeryck (22) Grand Soleil 34 ‘JustTina’

Originally a dinghy sailor, Nicole has transitioned to large boats over the past few years, having accumulated hundreds of miles in racing and deliveries.

Following her first attempt at the D2D in 2019, Nicole is hoping to help the JustTina team to a successful D2D result this time around.

Mark O'ConnorMark O'Connor

Mark O’Connor (22) J122 ‘Aurelia’ - Bow

Mark will be working the Bow on Chris Power Smiths’ J122, Aurelia. This is Mark’s First D2D race, having sailed offshore for the previous 2 seasons including the Fastnet 450 race.

Mark's love of sailing began age 12 doing “Start sailing” in the National Yacht club, since then he has been sailing Toppers, Lasers, Fireflies and keelboats both home and abroad.

Oisin CullenOisin Cullen

Oisin Cullen (20) SunFast3600 ‘Hot Cookie’ - Bow/Trim

Oisin started sailing dinghies in Dun Laoghaire at 10 years old and at 14 had the opportunity to sail on the J109 Wakey Wakey which started Oisin’s long-standing competition in ISORA.

Oisin has accumulated thousands of miles offshore competing in some of the worlds premier races such as the Rolex Fastnet, D2D and Round Ireland Race along with a tall ships race from London to Sines, Portugal.

Oisin is also a keen inshore sailor having competed in regattas such as the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta, Sovereigns week and Cowes Week. He also sails on J109 Jalapeño in DBSC.

Tom Shanahan, Gleb Romantchik and Kieran HallTom Shanahan, Gleb Romantchik and Kieran Hall

Tom Shanahan 22 - XP44 ‘WOW’ - Foredeck Team 

Tom will be racing aboard George Sisk’s XP44 WOW for the first time. Tom has been a member of the National since he could walk and grew up sailing in the junior section. He started racing offshore at a young age and has previously competed in two D2Ds aboard the J109 “Ruth”.

Tom enjoys racing around the cans in Dublin Bay as well as sailing with his university team during the academic year.

He is looking forward to a competitive fleet with close racing all around the Irish coast, as well as getting back to Dingle!

Gleb Romantchik - XP44 ‘WOW’ - Foredeck Team

Gleb will be racing aboard George Sisk’s XP44 WOW this year. Gleb grew up sailing in Schull, West Cark under the watchful eye of David Harte.

This will be Gleb's first D2D of what will hopefully be many.

Kieran Hall - XP44 ‘WOW’ - Foredeck Team

Kieran is racing aboard his usual boat, WOW. A Dublin Bay sailor at heart with plenty of offshore miles under his belt, but this will be his first Dingle.

He is looking forward to the starting gun!

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle
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The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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