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Displaying items by tag: Enterprise
12th March 2011

Tall Order for Ireland

Sailing in Ireland could yet have a tall ship to replace the Asgard II and the Lord Rank. A meeting in Dublin in late March represents a major step forward in the process to put an Irish tall ship back on the high seas.

The open workshop, to be held on March 26th, will be facilitated by Dublin Port, and will include state interests, tourism interests, commercial port interests, youth organisations, maritime organisations and education groups, together with the former Lord Rank and Asgard II operators.

The catalyst for the initiative is a 'reference group' which represents a broad cross-section of interests, both North and South. Operating under the chairmanship of Lord Glentoran, and supported by Dr Gerard O'Hare, David Beattie and Enda O'Coineen, the group has also engaged a professional consulting firm to move the process along.

The initial focus is on the necessary organisation and rationale behind building a new vessel, while scientifically quantifying the benefits to build a plan and justification.

The view taken is that, while there may be no money available at this time, there is no excuse for not having a plan and the idea is to create ' joined-up' thinking. And while the government in the South placed the insurance money paid out on Asgard II back into general exchequer funds, the insurance payment on the Lord Rank was kept and ' ring-fenced' for this new initiative.

To date, there have been several meetings of the reference group. The planned workshop on the subject at Dublin Port March 26 is open and interested parties are invited to contribute. It will also bring together for the first time the leaders of Tallships in Dublin, Belfast, Waterford and Cork.
Ultimately Tall Ships is about youth training and development; without an active Tall Ship, it will be very difficult for Ireland to attract Tall Ship events. The new reference group will work to support the new Sail Training Ireland Association initiative, and link in with Sail Training International which runs Tall Ship events.

Following the Dublin workshop, Belfast Harbour Commissioners will host a working meeting of the group in early May to finalise a plan, present to stakeholders and create a roadmap forward.

"In addition to youth training, a working Tall Ship forms a brilliant ambassadorial role promoting tourism, enterprise and commercial interests," said Lord Glentoran. "It is something that we can all relate to and it has universal acceptance for youth training on an island of Ireland basis." Lord Glentoran has a long commitment to youth sail training and was Chairman of the organising committee that brought the Tall Ships to Belfast in 1991.

The reference group is seeking to engage with as many stakeholders as possible, and has pledged that the new vessel will be owned by the community in Ireland and the Irish Diaspora. The initial view is that the project clearly needs to be linked with the institutions of State - North and South - as are universities state agencies and ports, while at the same time having a strong private support network making for a mix of public and private funding, "We now have a brilliant opportunity to look around the world, establish best practice in the best kind of vessel, how to fund it and to quantify the benefits for each of the stakeholder group," said Enda O'Coineen, who has been instrumental in bringing the group together. In addition to being a former Coiste and Asgard Director, he is the founding Chairman of Let's Do It Global, which brought the Volvo Ocean Race to Galway and successfully raced the Green Dragon around the world.

O'Coineen added that a "world class solution" can be created and that its benefits can be financially quantified, which would allow supporters to make a compelling business case to divert and use existing funds in Tourism, Enterprise and Youth Training. "While there is no money available now to support the scale and professionalism needed, this is not an excuse not to have a plan and a vision," he added.

Since the loss of the Asgard II and Lord Rank, Ireland has been left with no sail training opportunities for young people and likewise for maritime development, enterprise and tourism. If nothing is done, future generations will suffer. The reference group believes that the solution is the construction of an Ireland - North and South - training vessel, fulfilling several roles with a common mission and resourced according to quantifiable benefits delivered to stakeholders. It is also open to the use of an existing vessel - a key component being suitability and the operations budget.

The proposed Tall Ship project will enhance skills and opportunities for young people across the island, regardless of background, class or education. It could be used to showcase Ireland as a brand at overseas events and it could also host international students who wish to come to the island of Ireland, as is the case with many of the International Tall Ships Programmes already running on a global scale which create a huge amount of tourism for their respective countries.

The reference group notes that the Tall Ships concept appeals to young and old alike as the romanticism behind the concept touches on history, social studies, legacy, family, travel, adventure and, most importantly, fun. Tall Ships allow people to dream. They do however have an underlying seriousness and the concept is grounded in methodology that has been tested and proven the world over.

An advertisement in March/April of Afloat magazine - out now - gives full detials of the 'Tall Ship for Ireland' Workshop

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Previewing Ireland's Tall Ships 2011 Season


Published in Tall Ships

The Enterprise is a 4 metre, two sail sailing dinghy designed by Jack Holt. Its popularity is due to its excellent qualities both as a cruising and a two-man racing boat. The International Enterprise Class Association is based in the UK (also the UK Enterprise Association). There is also an active Irish Enterprise Association. For those who like to race, there is serious competition at both National and International level with some top names in sailing having passed through the class (eg, Shane McCarthy – now a professional sailor, Sean Craig, and Richard Estaugh).

The Enterprise Class is annually represented in the ISA Helmsman’s Championships. There are close to 23,000 registered boats world-wide and about 40 active Irish Enterprise boat owners. The Enterprise is an active and exciting chime-construction boat to sail. It has one mast and two sails (the mainsail and gib). It has neither spinnaker nor trapeze, has plenty of space, is simple in layout and is exceptionally smooth in handling. A large proportion of new boats are glass fibre. Alternatives are the composite boat for those who like wooden decks without the fuss of fitting out a wooden hull.

(Above information courtesy of Enterprise Class) 

Contact, Irish Enterprise Class Association, c/o Mr Richard Graves, President, 51 Carysfort Downs, Blackrock, Co Dublin. Email: [email protected], website: www.enterpriseclass.ie (inactive as at 23/9/09)

 

Afloat's Graham Smith wrote the following in the March 2009 issue: "Once the leading dinghy class in Ireland and the provider of many of Ireland’s leading sailors over a couple of decades, the Enterprise is now a pale shadow of its former self yet still provides close racing for the stalwarts who maintain an interest.

The national fleet has dwindled to around 25 dotted around six or seven clubs, with Bray – one of the pioneers of the class when it was formed 50 years ago – still the major supplier, so it’s no surprise to see Ger Dempsey from the County Wicklow club as the dominant figure in the class.

He won the two regional events – one on home waters and the other at Cullaun – before regaining his national title which Greystones’ Roy Van Maanen had taken the previous year when the event formed part of the Worlds in Dun Laoghaire.

National Champion as at March 2009: Ger Dempsey, Bray SC."

There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here 

Published in Classes & Assoc

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